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July 4, 1997
1776: Declaration of Independence assails King George III for preventing colonies from naturalizing new settlers. 1790: Naturalization reserved for "free white person[s]" with at last two years residence. 1802: Jeffersonian Republicans repeal 14-year residency mandate breifly imposed by rival Federalists. 1848: Treaty ending U.S.-Mexico War guarantees citizenship to Mexican subjects in new territories, including California.
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July 21, 2002 | LOUIS A. PEREZ JR., Louis A. Perez Jr. is the author of numerous books on Cuba, including "On Becoming Cuban: Identity, Nationality and Culture," and teaches at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
After more than 40 years of confrontation with the United States, Fidel Castro remains in power, defiant and determined to outlast one more hostile administration in Washington. Ten years after the collapse of socialism in Eastern Europe, at a time when the United States projects power across the globe virtually uncontested, the Cuban government, a mere 90 miles away, amends its constitution to proclaim the inalterable character of socialism on the island.
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NEWS
April 14, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Claiming descent from the fabled English colonists who vanished from Roanoke Island in the 1500s, the proud Lumbee Indians have spent centuries trying to carve a place for themselves between the white man's world and the Indian's. Dutch settlers entering this swampy inland valley in the early 1730s were astonished to discover a tribe of Indians living in wooden houses, practicing Christianity and speaking a form of Elizabethan English.
NEWS
August 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Kennedy went toe-to-toe with the chief of NASA to try to convince him that beating the Russians to the moon should be the agency's priority, newly released White House tapes showed Wednesday. Kennedy and NASA Administrator James Webb had a long and sometimes abrupt exchange in a November 1962 meeting in which Kennedy stressed the Cold War political importance of winning the space race.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody knows her birth name. Zintkala Nuni, the Lakota call her. Lost Bird. Today, she is lost no more. A century after the infant was discovered alive, lying beneath her mother's body on the killing fields of Wounded Knee, her remains have been brought home. In a traditional ceremony, Lost Bird was interred Thursday, near the mass grave where 200 slain Native Americans, including her mother, were unceremoniously buried Jan. 3, 1891.
NEWS
June 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
The U.S. military used nerve gas on a mission to kill Americans who defected during the Vietnam War, CNN and Time magazine said Sunday in a joint report. The so-called Operation Tailwind was approved by the Nixon White House as well as the CIA, the report said, quoting as its main source retired Adm. Thomas Moorer, a Vietnam-era chief of naval operations and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
The eagle has landed at Sun Valley Middle School. On Wednesday, students there participated in "The Eagle Flies Free," an innovative program visiting southern California schools in an attempt to make learning about United States history a little more fun. "For some kids history can be boring," said Principal Manuel Rangell. "They ask 'why is this relevant? What difference does it make? Who cares?' This program ties history into the child's world view. It makes history relevant."
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
More than 180 years after Thomas Paine's remains were dug up and carted off to England, his disciples think it's time to bring home the man who helped inspire the American Revolution. That's not as easy as it sounds, since most of Paine is missing and bits of him seem to have migrated all over the world. "I don't know how effective this will be, but it would be wonderful for the city to welcome back our most famous citizen," New Rochelle Mayor Tim Idoni said Friday.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memories are clear as the sky over San Fernando 60-some years ago, the words sharp as the overhand curveball he threw for three decades from mounds throughout California. The man who was king of the Aces peers out from behind a podium and offers a gentle smile. Before him sits a rapt audience, several teams of third- and fourth-generation Japanese American ballplayers who have just completed a Labor Day tournament in Woodland Hills without realizing the rich tradition they are perpetuating.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the United States hailed its new relationship with Saudi Arabia on Wednesday, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney took note of a little-remembered meeting that provided early stability to Washington's relations with the desert kingdom. During his crisis meeting with King Fahd last weekend, Cheney recalled, the Saudi king had spoken of the two countries' historic relationship dating back to a meeting between his father, King Abdulaziz ibn Saud, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | MYRON BECKENSTEIN, BALTIMORE SUN
We all know how to celebrate U.S. independence on the Fourth of July, but how much do we know of the American Revolution itself, its famous personalities and the era? Here's a quiz to find out. 1. The Revolutionary War lasted from: A. 1775-77. B. 1775-83. C. 1776-81. 2. The major military turning point in the war was the battle of: A. Brooklyn. B. Saratoga. C. Yorktown. 3. Which American Revolution figure was sentenced to death in the French Revolution?: A. John Adams. B. Sam Adams. C.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2001 | LISA LIPMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
An exhibition commemorating the bicentennial of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark's transcontinental journey will bring together almost all existing artifacts from that voyage for the first time since the explorers returned in 1806. "The artifacts are extremely scattered," said Carolyn Gilman, project director of the Missouri Historical Society in St. Louis, who came up with the idea for the exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen-year-old Kacey Tanabe has never been to Japan and her family barely speaks Japanese. Still, she feels as though she's been blamed for World War II. "This kid told me Japanese people are stupid because we started the war," said Tanabe, who goes to school in Montebello. "How do I have control of it? I can't do anything about it. It's not my fault."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, the U.S. military got the movie it wanted from "Pearl Harbor"--and unlike the infamous attack, that should come as no surprise. In exchange for substantial help from the military--including the right to film at Pearl Harbor and other military installations on Hawaii--director Michael Bay and producer Jerry Bruckheimer provided the Pentagon with an early script.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | From Reuters
Archeologists said Friday they have discovered a Union medallion inside the Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley, which went down off the South Carolina coast during the Civil War after becoming the first submarine to sink an enemy ship in battle. The medallion, made either of copper or bronze, bore the name of a Connecticut soldier who had enlisted with the Union army in a volunteer unit. He was killed in July 1863 during an assault on Ft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001
Scientists studying the recovered Confederate submarine H.S. Hunley have now found the remains of eight crewmen, leaving only the vessel's captain, Lt. George Dixon, unaccounted for. All of the crewmen were found at their battle stations ready to crank the sub's propeller shaft, indicating that the craft probably sank very quickly, though researchers don't yet know why. Dixon would have been in the rear of the sub, an area that has not yet been excavated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1994
As a secondary school history teacher for 38 years and the author of more than 30 history books for high school and middle school students, I heartily commend your editorial praising the new national standards for United States history (Oct. 27). Instead of perpetuating the boring practice of asking students to regurgitate isolated names, events, and dates, the new standards challenge youngsters to apply historical evidence and critical thinking to understanding what has happened in the past and what is happening today.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | Associated Press
President Reagan said today he has no plan to intervene militarily in Panama as U.S. officials scrambled to assess "a precarious position" brought on in part by federal drug-smuggling indictments of strongman Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega. But the State Department said the United States will continue to recognize Eric Arturo Delvalle as president of Panama, despite a parliamentary vote to oust him and replace him with former Education Minister Manuel Solis Palma.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,000 additional hours of Richard Nixon's historic White House tape-recordings will be offered for sale to the public, his heirs and the National Archives announced Tuesday. Although the so-called Watergate tapes--containing evidence of criminality--were chiefly responsible for Nixon's resignation in August 1974, the new recordings will include much more than the scandal, officials said.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | From Times wire services
Scientists uncovered the remains of a sailor they think may have been the second-in-command of the Confederate sub H.L. Hunley. Now, scientists say, they have salvaged the remains of four of the nine sailors aboard the vessel when it sank in 1864, moments after becoming the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. Researchers in Charleston found a thighbone, an arm bone and a shoulder blade belonging to a crewman, project director Bob Neyland said.
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