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NEWS
June 4, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is but the farm of a patriot, a small sign reads. But the estate on a hillside here is so much more: the summer White House of the nation's second president; a monument to the skills and sensibility of a wife who kept the place afloat while her husband worked abroad; a repository of 78,000 artifacts and letters--all original to four generations of John Adams' family. "This wonderful house," historian David McCullough said during a visit last week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen-year-old Kacey Tanabe has never been to Japan and her family barely speaks Japanese. Still, she feels as though she's been blamed for World War II. "This kid told me Japanese people are stupid because we started the war," said Tanabe, who goes to school in Montebello. "How do I have control of it? I can't do anything about it. It's not my fault."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, the U.S. military got the movie it wanted from "Pearl Harbor"--and unlike the infamous attack, that should come as no surprise. In exchange for substantial help from the military--including the right to film at Pearl Harbor and other military installations on Hawaii--director Michael Bay and producer Jerry Bruckheimer provided the Pentagon with an early script.
NEWS
May 28, 2001 | MARTIN MILLER and LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Jim Jeffords now walks in the footsteps of Winston Churchill, Ronald Reagan and Abraham Lincoln. He does so not by leading his nation through crises, but by leaving his longtime political party. Jeffords' bold move to leave the Republicans and become an Independent made national and international headlines because it marked the first time a party change shifted the balance of power in the U.S. Congress.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | From Reuters
Archeologists said Friday they have discovered a Union medallion inside the Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley, which went down off the South Carolina coast during the Civil War after becoming the first submarine to sink an enemy ship in battle. The medallion, made either of copper or bronze, bore the name of a Connecticut soldier who had enlisted with the Union army in a volunteer unit. He was killed in July 1863 during an assault on Ft.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When teacher Benee Hobson introduces the Vietnam War to his students at Luther Burbank High School, reactions are radically mixed. Most of the students have little concept of the war, he said, seeing it as "part of the ancient past." Many others are children of Vietnamese refugees--some of whom fled their homeland when Saigon fell in 1975. "It's a little tricky teaching it," Hobson said, "because there are so many different perspectives on that war."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001
Scientists studying the recovered Confederate submarine H.S. Hunley have now found the remains of eight crewmen, leaving only the vessel's captain, Lt. George Dixon, unaccounted for. All of the crewmen were found at their battle stations ready to crank the sub's propeller shaft, indicating that the craft probably sank very quickly, though researchers don't yet know why. Dixon would have been in the rear of the sub, an area that has not yet been excavated.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,000 additional hours of Richard Nixon's historic White House tape-recordings will be offered for sale to the public, his heirs and the National Archives announced Tuesday. Although the so-called Watergate tapes--containing evidence of criminality--were chiefly responsible for Nixon's resignation in August 1974, the new recordings will include much more than the scandal, officials said.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost 50 years, Ann Fagan Ginger seethed about the choice Harvard University handed her husband. Finally the 75-year-old lawyer from Berkeley wrote a long letter last fall seeking redress from the institution that in 1954 told her husband to sign an anti-communist oath--or pack up and leave. In a succinct acknowledgment in December, Harvard's Board of Overseers responded that in 1954 the school "took an action . . . that many people today, looking back, would not find appropriate."
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Created in 1865 to protect newly freed slaves from swindlers and to instill in them habits of "thrift and industry," the Freedman's Savings & Trust Co. did neither, ultimately going belly-up with millions of dollars of their money. But now, more than a century later, its depositors' records may help thousands of African Americans find their roots. "What was really a tragedy has turned into a marvelous treasure," said Elder John B.
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