Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States History
IN THE NEWS

United States History

ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, the U.S. military got the movie it wanted from "Pearl Harbor"--and unlike the infamous attack, that should come as no surprise. In exchange for substantial help from the military--including the right to film at Pearl Harbor and other military installations on Hawaii--director Michael Bay and producer Jerry Bruckheimer provided the Pentagon with an early script.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 28, 2001 | MARTIN MILLER and LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Jim Jeffords now walks in the footsteps of Winston Churchill, Ronald Reagan and Abraham Lincoln. He does so not by leading his nation through crises, but by leaving his longtime political party. Jeffords' bold move to leave the Republicans and become an Independent made national and international headlines because it marked the first time a party change shifted the balance of power in the U.S. Congress.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | From Reuters
Archeologists said Friday they have discovered a Union medallion inside the Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley, which went down off the South Carolina coast during the Civil War after becoming the first submarine to sink an enemy ship in battle. The medallion, made either of copper or bronze, bore the name of a Connecticut soldier who had enlisted with the Union army in a volunteer unit. He was killed in July 1863 during an assault on Ft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001
Scientists studying the recovered Confederate submarine H.S. Hunley have now found the remains of eight crewmen, leaving only the vessel's captain, Lt. George Dixon, unaccounted for. All of the crewmen were found at their battle stations ready to crank the sub's propeller shaft, indicating that the craft probably sank very quickly, though researchers don't yet know why. Dixon would have been in the rear of the sub, an area that has not yet been excavated.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,000 additional hours of Richard Nixon's historic White House tape-recordings will be offered for sale to the public, his heirs and the National Archives announced Tuesday. Although the so-called Watergate tapes--containing evidence of criminality--were chiefly responsible for Nixon's resignation in August 1974, the new recordings will include much more than the scandal, officials said.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | From Times wire services
Scientists uncovered the remains of a sailor they think may have been the second-in-command of the Confederate sub H.L. Hunley. Now, scientists say, they have salvaged the remains of four of the nine sailors aboard the vessel when it sank in 1864, moments after becoming the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. Researchers in Charleston found a thighbone, an arm bone and a shoulder blade belonging to a crewman, project director Bob Neyland said.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
More than 180 years after Thomas Paine's remains were dug up and carted off to England, his disciples think it's time to bring home the man who helped inspire the American Revolution. That's not as easy as it sounds, since most of Paine is missing and bits of him seem to have migrated all over the world. "I don't know how effective this will be, but it would be wonderful for the city to welcome back our most famous citizen," New Rochelle Mayor Tim Idoni said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent weekday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, fifth-grader Edwin Mendoza's eyes were opened to the 19th-century world of Queen Victoria. At the same time, J.J. Albert, a 22-year-old Cal Lutheran University senior, was poring over once-private documents on the 40th president's immigration policy for his final project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the nation is trying to decide how President Bill Clinton's legacy will be judged, four Chapman University students who critiqued Gerald R. Ford's unique term in office got to hear his reactions firsthand Saturday. The event, sponsored by the school's Center for Cold War Studies, culminated a two-day symposium that highlighted the Ford presidency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the nation considers what former President Clinton's legacy will be, four Chapman University students who critiqued Gerald Ford's presidency got to hear his reactions firsthand as part of a school symposium Saturday. The event culminated a two-day conference that focused on the Ford presidency. Four students wrote essays on such topics as economics and the two assassination attempts on Ford, and read them to the former president before an audience of nearly 200 people.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|