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United States Holocaust Memorial Council

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1994
President Clinton announced Tuesday that he will appoint a Claremont McKenna College philosophy professor to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council. The council, established in 1979, oversees the Holocaust Memorial Museum, which opened last year in Washington, and organizes the annual commemoration of the Days of Remembrance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1994
President Clinton announced Tuesday that he will appoint a Claremont McKenna College philosophy professor to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council. The council, established in 1979, oversees the Holocaust Memorial Museum, which opened last year in Washington, and organizes the annual commemoration of the Days of Remembrance.
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NEWS
August 18, 1988 | From the Washington Post
The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council has signed a breakthrough agreement with the Soviet Union that will make available for the first time millions of Nazi documents, photographs and other records of the Holocaust captured by Soviet troops at the end of World War II in Eastern Europe, council officials revealed Wednesday. The agreement, signed July 29 in Moscow, stipulates that the council will have access to what could be several million documents that can be copied for its planned U.S.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | Reuters
President Bush will nominate Kitty Dukakis, the wife of his former Democratic presidential rival, for a post on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, the White House announced Tuesday. Mrs. Dukakis, who is Jewish, has previously served on the President's Commission on the Holocaust. She will replace Milton Himmelfarb to complete a term that expires Jan. 15, 1991.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | Reuters
President Bush will nominate Kitty Dukakis, the wife of his former Democratic presidential rival, for a post on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, the White House announced Tuesday. Mrs. Dukakis, who is Jewish, has previously served on the President's Commission on the Holocaust. She will replace Milton Himmelfarb to complete a term that expires Jan. 15, 1991.
NEWS
October 9, 1997
Hadassah Rosensaft, 85, a Polish Holocaust survivor who is credited with helping save hundreds of Jewish inmates at Auschwitz and who later testified against the concentration camp's commandants. Aware that sick inmates were often ordered to the gas chambers at Auschwitz, Rosensaft, a dentist, sent them out of the infirmary and told camp officials they were healthy. She testified at the 1945 war crimes trial of former commandants and staff members from Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Former U.S. Ambassador Ronald S. Lauder, an heir to the Estee Lauder cosmetics fortune, said Wednesday he would seek the Republican nomination for mayor of New York City against three-term Democratic incumbent Edward I. Koch. "I have been a diplomat and a businessman, but above all I am a New Yorker and I am particularly concerned about the future of the city of New York, a city in deep crisis," Lauder said. " . . .
NEWS
April 22, 1985 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Elie Wiesel, the concentration camp survivor who urged President Reagan last Friday to reconsider plans to visit a German military cemetery where 47 Nazi SS troops are buried, suggested Sunday that West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl release the President from his commitment. As a "perfect" alternative, Wiesel said, Reagan and Kohl should go to the site of the grim Ploetzensee prison in the Charlottenburg sector of West Berlin, where leaders of the anti-Nazi underground were put to death.
NEWS
October 14, 1986 | Associated Press
Elie Wiesel, who survived the Nazi Holocaust to become the voice of its victims and a champion of dignity for all people, was named winner of the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize today. The Norwegian Nobel Committee praised the naturalized American author as a spiritual leader in an age of violence and hatred. "Wiesel's commitment, which originated in the sufferings of the Jewish people, has been widened to embrace all repressed peoples and races," its citation said.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Myriad quincentennial events marking Christopher Columbus' arrival in the New World have overshadowed another significant event of Spanish history that occurred the same year. The ejection of the Jews from Spain will be the topic of a lecture at 7:30 p.m. on April 26. USC professor Moshe Lazar will discuss that event in his lecture, "1492 Edict of Expulsion: Spain Expels All Jews" at Temple Etz Chaim, 1080 Janss Road, Thousand Oaks.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | From the Washington Post
The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council has signed a breakthrough agreement with the Soviet Union that will make available for the first time millions of Nazi documents, photographs and other records of the Holocaust captured by Soviet troops at the end of World War II in Eastern Europe, council officials revealed Wednesday. The agreement, signed July 29 in Moscow, stipulates that the council will have access to what could be several million documents that can be copied for its planned U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Alfred Gottschalk, a leader of Reform Judaism who ordained the first American woman rabbi and headed Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion for three decades, died Saturday in Cincinnati. He was 79. A Hebrew Union official said Gottschalk died from complications following an automobile accident late last year Gottschalk, who escaped the Holocaust as a child in Germany, oversaw the expansion of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, the Reform seminary and graduate school with campuses in Los Angeles, New York, Cincinnati and Jerusalem, during 25 years as president.
BOOKS
June 17, 1990 | John K. Roth, Roth, professor of philosophy at Claremont McKenna College, has published "Approaches to Auschwitz" (John Knox) and "Holocaust: Religious and Philosophical Implications" (Paragon) and is currently working on "Memory Offended: The Auschwitz Convent Controversy" (Praeger/Greenwood)
On April 12, 1990, East Germany installed its first democratic government. Immediately the Parliament issued an apology. Admitting responsibility "for the humiliation, expulsion and murder of Jewish women, men and children," it reversed 40 years of East German denial of responsibility for the Holocaust, the Third Reich's genocidal "Final Solution," which annihilated nearly 6 million Jews.
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