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United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

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April 30, 2003 | Aparna Kumar, Times Staff Writer
Glimpsing the Nazi labor camp at Auschwitz for the first time, Samuel Spiegel thought to himself: "This is the end." That was in 1944. He was 20. He had arrived at the camp on a cramped cattle car with his sweetheart, Regina Gutman, 18, whom he had met in a slave labor camp for Jews in Pionki, Poland. "The minute they got us out of the train, they separated us," Regina said. "I thought that none of us will ever make it."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Alfred Gottschalk, a leader of Reform Judaism who ordained the first American woman rabbi and headed Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion for three decades, died Saturday in Cincinnati. He was 79. A Hebrew Union official said Gottschalk died from complications following an automobile accident late last year Gottschalk, who escaped the Holocaust as a child in Germany, oversaw the expansion of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, the Reform seminary and graduate school with campuses in Los Angeles, New York, Cincinnati and Jerusalem, during 25 years as president.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Max Stodel took off his jacket to display the number the Nazis had tattooed on his left arm a half-century ago: 178621. A photographer in a small room at the Century Plaza snapped a picture, recording the fact that Stodel, a retired ladies garment presser from Culver City, is a survivor of the Holocaust. The photo will become part of the collection of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, set to open in 1993 in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2007 | Arthur Max, Associated Press
JERUSALEM -- The climate-controlled room whirs with electronics. A digital recorder copies a 46-year-old video of the trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann. Other machines digitize audio testimonies taped by Holocaust survivors. Microfilmed war documents flash across a digital scanner at two images per second, or 5 million a month. Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial is getting its huge archive ready to go online. In Washington, the U.S.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
Visitors waited in line up to four hours to be among the first inside as the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum opened to the public on Monday. Minutes before the doors opened, the Dalai Lama of Tibet toured the museum and prayed for the millions killed in the World War II Holocaust. He was the first of many international spiritual figures expected to visit the building, which was dedicated last week. The first wave of public visitors included many homosexuals, one of the targets of the Nazis.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cold rain that fell from leaden skies, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum was dedicated Thursday at a ceremony where the chants of neo-Nazi protesters served as a reminder that the present is not yet purged of all the hatreds of the past.
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | From Associated Press
The newly selected director of the United States Holocaust Museum, under fire for questionable academic conduct, has resigned two weeks before he was to take office. Steven R. Katz sent a letter of resignation to the museum Friday, saying the "frivolous and non-meritorious allegations which have been asserted would unduly distract" from the work of the museum.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | Associated Press
President Reagan unveiled the cornerstone of the Holocaust Memorial Museum on Wednesday and challenged the Soviet Union to relax its restrictions on Jewish emigration, saying, "Let these people go." "In these days of glasnost , we hear talk of liberalizing attitudes toward Judaism in the Soviet Union," the President told about 1,500 people gathered in a tent at the museum site near the Washington Monument.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Clinton welcomed world leaders and Holocaust survivors Wednesday on the eve of the opening of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, which he said will stand as "a sharp thorn in every national memory." Clinton and his wife, Hillary, joined 900 guests at a reception under a tent on the South Lawn in a steady rain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was May 1939, and the luxury liner St. Louis set sail from Hamburg, Germany, with 937 passengers, almost all of them Jews fleeing the Nazis. The ship reached Havana on May 27, but Cuba, already awash in Jewish immigrants from Europe, denied the passengers entry. The ship then headed for the Florida coast--and with the lights of Miami twinkling in the distance--the passengers sent pleas for admission to the United States.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2003 | Aparna Kumar, Times Staff Writer
Glimpsing the Nazi labor camp at Auschwitz for the first time, Samuel Spiegel thought to himself: "This is the end." That was in 1944. He was 20. He had arrived at the camp on a cramped cattle car with his sweetheart, Regina Gutman, 18, whom he had met in a slave labor camp for Jews in Pionki, Poland. "The minute they got us out of the train, they separated us," Regina said. "I thought that none of us will ever make it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was May 1939, and the luxury liner St. Louis set sail from Hamburg, Germany, with 937 passengers, almost all of them Jews fleeing the Nazis. The ship reached Havana on May 27, but Cuba, already awash in Jewish immigrants from Europe, denied the passengers entry. The ship then headed for the Florida coast--and with the lights of Miami twinkling in the distance--the passengers sent pleas for admission to the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1997 | Daniel Cariaga
Summarizing three seasons in this series, these CDs represent composers who did not survive the Holocaust, who wrote while imprisoned, or who connect to that era in pre- and postwar writing. The high quality of unfamiliar music by Paul Ben-Haim, Olivier Messiaen and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco earns admiration, as do lesser works by David Diamond, George Perle, Herman Berlinski and Robert Starer. Most engaging on Vol.
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | From Associated Press
The newly selected director of the United States Holocaust Museum, under fire for questionable academic conduct, has resigned two weeks before he was to take office. Steven R. Katz sent a letter of resignation to the museum Friday, saying the "frivolous and non-meritorious allegations which have been asserted would unduly distract" from the work of the museum.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
Visitors waited in line up to four hours to be among the first inside as the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum opened to the public on Monday. Minutes before the doors opened, the Dalai Lama of Tibet toured the museum and prayed for the millions killed in the World War II Holocaust. He was the first of many international spiritual figures expected to visit the building, which was dedicated last week. The first wave of public visitors included many homosexuals, one of the targets of the Nazis.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cold rain that fell from leaden skies, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum was dedicated Thursday at a ceremony where the chants of neo-Nazi protesters served as a reminder that the present is not yet purged of all the hatreds of the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2007 | Arthur Max, Associated Press
JERUSALEM -- The climate-controlled room whirs with electronics. A digital recorder copies a 46-year-old video of the trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann. Other machines digitize audio testimonies taped by Holocaust survivors. Microfilmed war documents flash across a digital scanner at two images per second, or 5 million a month. Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial is getting its huge archive ready to go online. In Washington, the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1997 | Daniel Cariaga
Summarizing three seasons in this series, these CDs represent composers who did not survive the Holocaust, who wrote while imprisoned, or who connect to that era in pre- and postwar writing. The high quality of unfamiliar music by Paul Ben-Haim, Olivier Messiaen and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco earns admiration, as do lesser works by David Diamond, George Perle, Herman Berlinski and Robert Starer. Most engaging on Vol.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Clinton welcomed world leaders and Holocaust survivors Wednesday on the eve of the opening of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, which he said will stand as "a sharp thorn in every national memory." Clinton and his wife, Hillary, joined 900 guests at a reception under a tent on the South Lawn in a steady rain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Max Stodel took off his jacket to display the number the Nazis had tattooed on his left arm a half-century ago: 178621. A photographer in a small room at the Century Plaza snapped a picture, recording the fact that Stodel, a retired ladies garment presser from Culver City, is a survivor of the Holocaust. The photo will become part of the collection of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, set to open in 1993 in Washington.
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