Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Immigrants
IN THE NEWS

United States Immigrants

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 28, 1997 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what may be the first comprehensive study of its kind, a new report shows that immigrants from Mexico and four other Latin American nations sent $4 billion to their families in their homelands in 1990, an amount exceeding the U.S. foreign aid to those countries. The report, to be released today by the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, found that the transfer of money from the U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 28, 1997 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what may be the first comprehensive study of its kind, a new report shows that immigrants from Mexico and four other Latin American nations sent $4 billion to their families in their homelands in 1990, an amount exceeding the U.S. foreign aid to those countries. The report, to be released today by the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, found that the transfer of money from the U.S.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1996
A Bottle's Long Journey Bottle discovered on Cuban coast. D'Albert's 5th- grade class received response in April 1991.Judy d'Albert sets bottle with note adrift in June. 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1996
A Bottle's Long Journey Bottle discovered on Cuban coast. D'Albert's 5th- grade class received response in April 1991.Judy d'Albert sets bottle with note adrift in June. 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1995 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On this day of tradition we propose a toast to the Christmas rites that have come to us from distant lands. Over time the native tongue may slip and the stories of Old World kings and queens may fade, but something about the flame of childhood Christmases will not go out. And in time, like Santa Claus and Christmas trees, it spreads to us all. Some Christmas customs have become so familiar they seem almost like our own.
NEWS
November 28, 1993
NAME: Nativo Vigil Lopez AGE: 43 WORK: Co-national director of Hermandad Mexicana Nacional, an immigrant rights group. HOME: Santa Ana IMMIGRATION STATUS: Seventh-generation American. His ancestors lived in the portion of Mexico that later became the Southwestern United States. "Immigrants are good for America. They always have been.
NEWS
September 9, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States ranks among the most literate nations in the Western world, surpassed only by three Scandinavian countries, Canada and the Netherlands, according to a survey released Friday. At the same time, a high percentage of older Americans lack even rudimentary skills to read the instructions on a bottle of medicine, the study showed. Finland, Norway and Sweden--home to relatively homogeneous populations--led the pack among adults ages 26 to 65. Sweden took top honors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2000
Re "Bush Crosses Historic Lines in Local Stop," Aug. 10. George W. Bush must think the people of Oxnard can't remember from one minute or election to the next. Does he think we forgot or don't care that Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-Simi Valley) coauthored Proposition 187? Does he think it unimportant that Gallegly bragged about supporting the proposition's restrictions, which deny children born in the United States to immigrants unable to prove their legal status their right to attend public schools or receive any type of public health care?
NEWS
March 3, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Restrictions in U.S. immigration policy are preventing many Indochinese refugees from entering this country, condemning them to squalid, dangerous camps where they accuse the United States of "turning its back on them," a refugee assistance group charged Monday. Almost 300,000 displaced Cambodians in camps along the Thai-Cambodian border are "extremely vulnerable" to external attacks and to robbery, rape and extortion, said Le Xuan Khoa, president of the Indochina Resource Action Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
While applauding the turnaround by immigration officials in proposing that relatives of aliens who qualify for amnesty be allowed to remain in the United States, immigrants rights' advocates expressed concern Wednesday that other provisions in the bill would limit family unification for others. "I look upon this as a real mixed blessing . . . a serious trade-off," said Linda Wong, a leader in a Los Angeles coalition of immigrants' rights groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1995 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On this day of tradition we propose a toast to the Christmas rites that have come to us from distant lands. Over time the native tongue may slip and the stories of Old World kings and queens may fade, but something about the flame of childhood Christmases will not go out. And in time, like Santa Claus and Christmas trees, it spreads to us all. Some Christmas customs have become so familiar they seem almost like our own.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
Eligible illegal immigrants wanting to attain legal resident status by paying a fine and staying in the country must apply for immigrant visas by April 30, officials said Friday. The Immigration and Naturalization Service released official rules for a law signed in December by then-President Clinton. The law has made it easier for certain illegal immigrants to become legal by allowing them to apply in the United States. Previously, immigrants had to return to their home countries to apply.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|