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NEWS
July 4, 1997
1776: Declaration of Independence assails King George III for preventing colonies from naturalizing new settlers. 1790: Naturalization reserved for "free white person[s]" with at last two years residence. 1802: Jeffersonian Republicans repeal 14-year residency mandate breifly imposed by rival Federalists. 1848: Treaty ending U.S.-Mexico War guarantees citizenship to Mexican subjects in new territories, including California.
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NEWS
August 9, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the U.S.-Mexico talks on immigration, it is the unspoken word, a term so sensitive that officials on both sides of the bargaining table avoid using it in public. The word is "amnesty." Today, as Cabinet officials of the United States and Mexico meet to discuss an array of immigration issues, their agenda includes border safety, a new guest worker program and other strategies to impose order on the chaotic human flow across America's southern boundary.
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NEWS
April 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration obtained advance support of American Jewish leaders before imposing new rules that had the effect of diverting most Soviet Jewish emigres from the United States to Israel, according to informed sources. Administration officials and Jewish leaders both said that the consultations defused what could have turned into a firestorm of controversy.
NEWS
August 3, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a push for a broadly inclusive immigration plan, House and Senate Democrats on Thursday said the United States should create a program to legalize undocumented workers of all nationalities and that such employees should enjoy the same labor rights as everyone else. The Democratic manifesto, which comes just a week after President Bush hinted that all unlawful immigrants may be considered in his new legalization approach, suggests that the debate has broadened beyond U.S.
SPORTS
December 6, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former gymnast Nadia Comaneci and the married roofer who arranged her defection from Romania revealed their romance Tuesday, but they repeatedly shunned questions about their immediate personal plans. Comaneci made it clear, however, that she has no desire to become involved with gymnastics in the United States. Appearing bewildered by the more than 100 journalists at a news conference in Hollywood, Fla.
NEWS
April 17, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Cuba he became a policeman like his older brother, and then studied to be a physical education instructor. After he, his wife and their two young children got visas to come here in 1984, he worked odd jobs--painting boats and doing body and fender work. Lazaro Gonzalez was never political. He was no community leader. He made no news. But right now the 49-year-old great-uncle of Elian Gonzalez is one of the most talked-about people in America. To the U.S.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the U.S. Border Patrol is a rogue agency as its detractors insist, the most renegade branch is based here along the northern expanses of the Sonoran desert. Within the last six months, an agent and a former agent were convicted in separate cases of smuggling drugs while on duty. Another agent was tried on charges of murder and assault, and a veteran investigator was locked up for perjury.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dealing the Justice Department a major setback in its efforts to deport Los Angeles-area Palestinians it claimed were national security threats, a federal judge on Friday struck down a section of the McCarran-Walter Act under which the aliens were charged with subversion. It was the second time that U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson has ruled that certain provisions of the McCarthy-Era act, which allows the government to deport aliens for their political views, were unconstitutional.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | From the Washington Post
Immigration to the United States during the 1980s is expected to match or exceed the historic high mark set by the flood of nearly 9 million immigrants who reached America in the first decade of the century, a new study of government statistics concludes. The report by the Center for Immigration Studies, a research group, said the number of legal immigrants between 1981 and 1990 will equal or surpass the 8.7 million total between 1901 and 1910.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Legal Affairs Writer
Kong Moua, a Hmong tribesman from the hills of Laos, drove to the Fresno City College campus looking for his intended bride. Locating her at her job in the student finance office, he spirited her away to his cousin's house. Kong Moua called it zij poj niam, or "marriage by capture," in his culture an accepted form of matrimony akin to elopement. However, his "bride," also a Hmong but more assimilated into American culture, called it kidnaping and rape. She also called the police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Good luck to you," a Los Angeles federal judge told Tony Alvarado on Monday as he sentenced the gang member turned model citizen to two years probation for illegally reentering the United States. U.S. District Judge George H. King's award of straight probation came as something of a surprise.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush said Thursday that the White House effort to confer legal status on millions of undocumented immigrants from Mexico might be extended to all others who are in the United States unlawfully. "Well, we'll consider all folks here," Bush said in response to a reporter's question. "Obviously, the Mexican issue is at the forefront. . . . But I'm open-minded. I'll listen to all proposals that people have in mind."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | PETER H. KING
It took two passes to find the building. There once had been a medallion-shaped sign identifying the tiny cinder-block structure as an outpost of the United States Border Patrol. The sign, though, had been removed. This was in the northwest outskirts of town, on a weedy stretch of Golden State Boulevard that included an auto wrecking yard, a school for truck drivers and the future home of a Mexican frozen-food plant.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | TYNISA E. TRAPPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Law enforcement officials have arrested nearly 8,000 people from 39 countries who allegedly attempted to enter the United States and Canada illegally in a sting described as one of the largest multinational anti-smuggling operations ever, authorities said Wednesday. Officials also took into custody 75 alleged smugglers--seven of whom are U.S.
NEWS
May 29, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Every Thursday night in a small conference room at one of America's most prestigious universities, a group of academic researchers talks about the education of some of the nation's most unseen students--its immigrant children. Hands soar into the air. The graduate and doctoral students interrupt, their voices running over one another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A member of the ruling family of Bahrain who eloped with a Marine and attempted to sneak into the United States has won her fight to stay, officials said Thursday. "I feel great, I'm so relieved," said Meriam Al-Khalifa, whose struggle to avoid deportation attracted international attention. "It's been very hard the last year and a half. Now I can begin my life. I love America!" In a deal arranged with the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Al-Khalifa and her husband, former Marine Pvt.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of Lebanese, seeking a safe haven from the horrific shelling of Beirut, have quietly been flooding into the United States since the Lebanese civil war escalated to unprecedented heights last spring, according to Arab-American community leaders here. Many of the Lebanese are coming to the Detroit area, home to the largest Arab community in the United States.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Border Patrol officials will close four of the six southbound lanes of Interstate 5 entering Mexico as part of a plan to prevent illegal immigrants from racing across the border and onto the busy freeway to cross into the United States, immigration officials said Tuesday. Beginning Thursday, the Border Patrol said, the last 100 yards of freeway before the border will be reduced to two lanes. It will also station another 25 agents along the freeway.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the center of this river port, known for its turbulent history of conflict between blacks and whites, there is a place where the old ideas about race and the South don't make sense anymore. Drive east from the Mississippi along Union Avenue, just past the studio where a then-unknown Elvis Presley showed up one day to record a song, and you'll come to an in-between place known as Midtown. Here, there are no ethnic or racial majorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renowned Iranian director Jafar Panahi, best known for his Oscar-nominated film "The White Balloon," was detained last weekend for 12 hours by immigration officials at JFK Airport in New York, where he was changing planes en route from the Hong Kong to the Buenos Aires film festivals. He was then held four more hours before being put on a plane back to Hong Kong and from there on to Tehran, where he makes his home, according to a friend of the director.
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