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BUSINESS
December 23, 1993 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The machine-tool industry--the business that makes machines which make other machines--might call it "Fadal Attraction." Fadal Engineering Co., a 33-year-old family-owned business, has bolted out of the blue to almost single-handedly overtake the Japanese in a portion of the market that they dominated for most of the 1980s.
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BUSINESS
August 16, 2001 | JEANNINE AVERSA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The nearly yearlong deterioration in industrial production slowed in July, raising hopes that the worst may be over for the battered manufacturing sector. Output at the nation's factories, mines and utilities fell 0.1% last month, after a 0.9% drop in June, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday. July's reduction was the 10th consecutive monthly decline in industrial production. Still, economists were heartened that the latest decline was smaller than the 0.3% drop they were forecasting.
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NEWS
June 17, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years after Congress declared war on toxic waste, the Environmental Protection Agency is allowing the same companies that created the most dangerous problems to determine the scope of contamination and propose how to clean it up.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation's factories slowed last month to their most sluggish pace in nearly 18 years, reflecting a broad manufacturing downturn and raising deeper concerns about the health of the U.S. economy. Figures from the Federal Reserve on Friday showed that the portion of the nation's industrial capacity being put to use fell to 77.4% in May. That's the lowest mark since it stood at 77% in August 1983, during the Reagan administration. In a related report, the Fed said production at U.S.
NEWS
February 21, 1995 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His touch is lost, the one that built parts for Galileo's flight to Jupiter, the one that knows instantly when a spacecraft rod is off by a thousandth of an inch--one-third the thickness of a piece of paper. Until recently, machinist Antonio M. Fonseca worked in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's "back shop" by feel, with what he calls a craftsman's touch. But today he picks up a spacecraft beam and his instinct escapes him. He can't think in inches anymore.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1991 | EVELYN RICHARDS, THE WASHINGTON POST
American manufacturers--written off by many commentators in the 1970s and '80s as dinosaurs doomed to succumb to Japanese and other foreign rivals--have staged a remarkable comeback, reviving American competitiveness in many industries. Xerox Corp. has halved the cost of producing a copier, and has steadily increased its share of the U.S. market since the mid-1980s. General Electric Co.'s exports have grown more than 20%, to $6 billion, in the past two years. Cummins Engine Co.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the dire warnings of the Bush Administration and business lobbying groups, many of America's biggest private employers say that passage of the civil rights legislation pending in Congress would not force them to adopt hiring quotas for minorities.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | Associated Press
After a four-year study on new technologies, the government has concluded that the next two decades will be a time of massive change in which virtually every U.S. product, service and job will be reshaped. The study by the congressional Office of Technology Assessment, released Saturday, said Americans in the 21st Century should enjoy longer, more productive lives than any preceding generation.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1991 | From Reuters
The government's main forecasting gauge for the economy stalled and building activity barely edged higher in August, the Commerce Department said Tuesday, raising fears that the sputtering recovery could run out of gas. A separate private report on manufacturing, which accounts for about one-fifth of all economic activity, showed that the industrial sector again expanded in September, but that the pace of improvement may be losing steam.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Council on Economic Priorities, a nonprofit group that publishes the popular consumer guide "Shopping for a Better World," has named some of America's best-known companies to a list of the nation's eight worst corporate environmental offenders. Rockwell International, General Electric, General Motors, Maxxam Group, Du Pont, Georgia-Pacific, USX and Cargill make up the council's list of environmental culprits.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2001 | KATHERINE RIZZO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A trade battle is shaping up over a law that lets U.S. companies pocket tens of millions of dollars in fines that the government collects from foreign competitors. Foreign governments say the law violates trade agreements and they have started proceedings against the United States in the World Trade Organization. If they win, they could cripple U.S. companies' ability to compete abroad by imposing duties of their own on U.S. goods.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The symptoms are ominous. The pulse of business is slow, orders are feeble. The stock market suffers from fits and fevers. And yet "it doesn't feel like a recession," says longtime investment banker Eric Lomas after visits to companies across the U.S. For the vast majority of businesses, finances are healthy, unsold inventories are moderate and companies are responding quickly to the slowdown.
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | MARLA DICKERSON and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Winter has always meant fat paychecks for Juan Carlos Gonzales. That's the height of masa season at his local food processing job, where line workers can expect plenty of overtime preparing the rich, corn-based dough used in holiday tamales. No longer. Saddled with rising costs and slowing sales, Gonzales' employer, Industry-based El Burrito Mexican Food Products Inc., hired temporary employees to work the extra hours this season.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early this year, local manufacturers such as furniture maker Larry Parnell were focused on tight labor supplies and rising wages--byproducts of a bustling economy. Then came higher interest rates, a flood of cheap imports and an energy shock that has fouled production and sent power bills soaring. Add Wall Street turmoil that has shaken consumer confidence to the core. Suddenly, it's as though someone hit the off switch on the nation's growth machine.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
The Clinton administration will issue a new rule today to make it harder for companies that have violated labor, tax or other federal laws to win government contracts, the Office of Management and Budget said Tuesday. The regulation, dubbed the "blacklisting" rule by industry critics, will take effect Jan. 19, one day before President Clinton's administration turns over the White House to Republican President-elect George W. Bush.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | SVEA HERBST-BAYLISS, REUTERS
U.S. manufacturers have become significantly less optimistic about the economic outlook for the next 12 months and see scant growth in capital spending, reinforcing concern the economy may lose more momentum in the months ahead. A semiannual survey of the nation's purchasing executives by the National Assn. of Purchasing Management showed Tuesday that, after shrinking in recent months, the outlook for the U.S. manufacturing sector next year is bleak.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
A "revolutionary" right-to-know law that requires manufacturing firms throughout the country to disclose each year the hazardous chemicals they released into the environment went into effect Friday, launching a new era of environmental regulation inspired by the 1984 Bhopal disaster.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1990 | EVELYN RICHARDS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Little Lanxide Corp. was barely a spot on the map of the vast chemical and materials industry dominated by the likes of Dow and Du Pont until, less than a year after its birth in 1983, Lanxide was tapped on the shoulder by an obscure Pentagon agency. Getting anointed with a mere $1 million from the government gave Lanxide the credibility it needed to attract $250 million more from private investors and big corporate partners, including its Delaware neighbor Du Pont Co.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2000 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delayed presidential election results and rising job cuts could be scarier than the Grinch, according to a top retail analyst and a report released Wednesday showing a surge in announced layoffs. Richard Giss, a partner in Deloitte & Touche in Los Angeles, said he believes the firm's recent forecast of 5.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2000 | KNUT ENGELMANN, REUTERS
Evidence of a U.S. economic slowdown grew Wednesday with fresh signs the nation's manufacturing sector is losing steam and a Federal Reserve survey showing reduced activity across much of the country. A separate report showed that construction activity remained robust in the world's top economy, however. The National Assn. of Purchasing Management said its key index of manufacturing activity slipped to 48.3 in October from 49.
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