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United States Information Agency

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NEWS
April 17, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton has selected Joseph Duffey, president of American University, to be director of the United States Information Agency, the White House announced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | ROBERT E. HUNTER, Robert E. Hunter, a senior advisor at Rand Corp. in Washington, was U.S. ambassador to NATO from 1993-98
Today, a part of the U.S. government that "ain't broke" gets "fixed." The United States Information Agency, long a beacon to the outside world of what is best in America, goes out of business. More accurately, it gets shoe-horned into the State Department, but it's a poor fit, and the relative independence that made USIA a respected voice abroad of the United States comes to an end.
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NEWS
June 28, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush announced Wednesday that he will nominate George F. Murphy Jr. to be inspector general of the United States Information Agency. Murphy has been deputy director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency since 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1994 | YVETTE CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County agencies that provide "au pairs"--young women and men from abroad who care for American children--say proposed government regulations could devastate their programs by imposing tough age and training requirements.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Dave Brubeck and his quartet will leave on Monday for a 16-day tour of the Soviet Union, the United States Information Agency announced on Wednesday. The jazz pianist--accompanied by Bill Smith, clarinet, his son Chris Brubeck on trombone and bass, and Randy Jones on drums--will play five concerts in Moscow from next Thursday through March 30, three in Estonia (April 2-4) and five in Leningrad (April 6-10).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The 5-year-old Worldnet project, a 133-country overseas television network operated by the United States Information Agency, has only 250,000 viewers for its flagship hour news program, the agency reported to Congress on Wednesday. The low number of viewers, coupled with less than ecstatic audience surveys, could doom USIA director Charles Wick's pet project that consumes most of the agency's $38.3-million television budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1988 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Los Angeles has set a 60-day deadline for the government to revise regulations on foreign distribution of domestic documentary films, rejecting claims that the move could force the United States to withdraw from an international film treaty. U.S. District Judge A. Wallace Tashima again disagreed with the contention of the United States Information Agency that it has the right to label certain films "propaganda," thus creating a barrier for their distribution overseas.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | JUDITH HAVEMANN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The United States Information Agency is financing a monthlong tour of the United States by a group of Soviet editors and writers associated with extreme Russian nationalist publications, some of whom have been accused of anti-Semitism. Several leaders of American Jewish groups have criticized the USIA for bringing the group to this country. "Inviting these kinds of people from the Soviet Union with known anti-Semitic views is unacceptable and harmful," said Mark E.
NEWS
October 13, 1987 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In a move that has raised questions about journalistic independence, the financially troubled United Press International this week will begin transmitting stories produced by the government's foreign news outlet to newsrooms in six European cities. Under the two-year, $2.5-million contract, the wire service will transmit news and features produced by the United States Information Agency from Washington to 33 news organizations in Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another twist in the ongoing conflict between American artists and the federal government, the United States Information Agency has withdrawn its support from a show of six California artists scheduled to open Oct. 16 in Istanbul, Turkey.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton has selected Joseph Duffey, president of American University, to be director of the United States Information Agency, the White House announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another twist in the ongoing conflict between American artists and the federal government, the United States Information Agency has withdrawn its support from a show of six California artists scheduled to open Oct. 16 in Istanbul, Turkey.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush on Wednesday named Henry Catto, the U.S. ambassador to Britain, to head the U.S. Information Agency. He would replace Bruce S. Gelb, whom Bush is nominating to be U.S. ambassador to Belgium. In a related job shuffle, Bush said he has selected Raymond G. H. Seitz, an assistant secretary of state, to be ambassador to Britain.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush announced Wednesday that he will nominate George F. Murphy Jr. to be inspector general of the United States Information Agency. Murphy has been deputy director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency since 1988.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | JUDITH HAVEMANN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The United States Information Agency is financing a monthlong tour of the United States by a group of Soviet editors and writers associated with extreme Russian nationalist publications, some of whom have been accused of anti-Semitism. Several leaders of American Jewish groups have criticized the USIA for bringing the group to this country. "Inviting these kinds of people from the Soviet Union with known anti-Semitic views is unacceptable and harmful," said Mark E.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The 5-year-old Worldnet project, a 133-country overseas television network operated by the United States Information Agency, has only 250,000 viewers for its flagship hour news program, the agency reported to Congress on Wednesday. The low number of viewers, coupled with less than ecstatic audience surveys, could doom USIA director Charles Wick's pet project that consumes most of the agency's $38.3-million television budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | ROBERT E. HUNTER, Robert E. Hunter, a senior advisor at Rand Corp. in Washington, was U.S. ambassador to NATO from 1993-98
Today, a part of the U.S. government that "ain't broke" gets "fixed." The United States Information Agency, long a beacon to the outside world of what is best in America, goes out of business. More accurately, it gets shoe-horned into the State Department, but it's a poor fit, and the relative independence that made USIA a respected voice abroad of the United States comes to an end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1994 | YVETTE CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County agencies that provide "au pairs"--young women and men from abroad who care for American children--say proposed government regulations could devastate their programs by imposing tough age and training requirements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1988 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Los Angeles has set a 60-day deadline for the government to revise regulations on foreign distribution of domestic documentary films, rejecting claims that the move could force the United States to withdraw from an international film treaty. U.S. District Judge A. Wallace Tashima again disagreed with the contention of the United States Information Agency that it has the right to label certain films "propaganda," thus creating a barrier for their distribution overseas.
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Information Agency, faced with a series of court rulings striking down its attempts to regulate foreign distribution of documentary films, said this week that it will back out of an international film treaty if the agency's latest package of regulations is rejected on appeal. The move, which could effectively limit the access of thousands of documentary film makers to foreign markets, followed three successive court rulings holding that USIA regulations for certifying U.S.
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