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NEWS
March 22, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
With President Reagan muting his criticism on Afghanistan, Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and Secretary of State George P. Shultz on Monday opened their latest round of talks aimed at preparing the next summit meeting of U.S. and Soviet leaders in late May in Moscow as well as ending some regional conflicts in the Third World.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Daniel Rothberg
Currently, all federal judges are required to obey a Code of Conduct for United States Judges . There's just one exception: the Supremes. For Supreme Court justices, following the code of conduct is voluntary. Or, as Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. put it in his 2011 year-end report , all members “consult” the rules and “in this way, the code plays the same role for the justices as it does for other federal judges.” For several years now there have been legislative efforts to require that high court justices adhere to the same rules set forth for all other federal judges; and today, a group of Democratic legislators are behind a renewed effort to address this disparity.
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NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Daniel Rothberg
Currently, all federal judges are required to obey a Code of Conduct for United States Judges . There's just one exception: the Supremes. For Supreme Court justices, following the code of conduct is voluntary. Or, as Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. put it in his 2011 year-end report , all members “consult” the rules and “in this way, the code plays the same role for the justices as it does for other federal judges.” For several years now there have been legislative efforts to require that high court justices adhere to the same rules set forth for all other federal judges; and today, a group of Democratic legislators are behind a renewed effort to address this disparity.
NEWS
August 6, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three appeals court judges on the special panel that appointed a new independent counsel in the politically charged Whitewater investigation Friday include two who were named to the federal bench by Republican presidents. One, Judge David B. Sentelle of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, is a native North Carolinian and avid supporter of conservative Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.). The other two, Judge Joseph Sneed of the U.S.
NEWS
August 6, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three appeals court judges on the special panel that appointed a new independent counsel in the politically charged Whitewater investigation Friday include two who were named to the federal bench by Republican presidents. One, Judge David B. Sentelle of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, is a native North Carolinian and avid supporter of conservative Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.). The other two, Judge Joseph Sneed of the U.S.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | Associated Press
Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall was released from a hospital Monday, five days after he fell in the lobby of a Chicago hotel, a court spokeswoman said. Marshall, 82, had undergone tests and observation at National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Md., the spokeswoman said.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The execution of murderer David Edwin Mason, scheduled to take place in 20 days, was blocked Tuesday by a federal judge despite the prisoner's wish that he be put to death. U.S. District Judge Ronald M. Whyte stayed the execution while a lawsuit challenging Mason's mental competence to volunteer for the gas chamber is heard by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Mason's attorney said he would join with the office of Atty. Gen.
SPORTS
February 19, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY
Even before the women's figure skating begins tonight, it might appear as if the United States is disadvantaged because it is not represented on the nine-judge panel. But U.S. Figure Skating Assn. officials do not seem particularly concerned. One reason, they say, is that the United States did not have a judge at the women's competition in last year's World Championship at Munich, Germany, where Americans Kristi Yamaguchi, Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan swept the medals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2005
Animation Trophy: Trader Joe's' "Family Outing," for best animation and motion. Isabella Coleman Trophy: FTD's "Garden of Dreams," for best presentation of color and color harmony through floral use. Craftsman Trophy: American Honda Motor Co.'s "Families Across America," for exceptional showmanship and dramatic impact in floats longer than 55 feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1997 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerardo Perez, his father, two brothers and a cousin apparently like the idea of operating family-run gourmet restaurants. Only a year ago, the Perez family opened Verona Trattoria Italian restaurant in Camarillo. Response has been so positive that last month they added Pompeii Trattoria, a French-Italian restaurant also in Camarillo, to the list. And a third establishment may not be far behind.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The execution of murderer David Edwin Mason, scheduled to take place in 20 days, was blocked Tuesday by a federal judge despite the prisoner's wish that he be put to death. U.S. District Judge Ronald M. Whyte stayed the execution while a lawsuit challenging Mason's mental competence to volunteer for the gas chamber is heard by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Mason's attorney said he would join with the office of Atty. Gen.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | Associated Press
Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall was released from a hospital Monday, five days after he fell in the lobby of a Chicago hotel, a court spokeswoman said. Marshall, 82, had undergone tests and observation at National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Md., the spokeswoman said.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
With President Reagan muting his criticism on Afghanistan, Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and Secretary of State George P. Shultz on Monday opened their latest round of talks aimed at preparing the next summit meeting of U.S. and Soviet leaders in late May in Moscow as well as ending some regional conflicts in the Third World.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that legal immigrants convicted of small amounts of marijuana possession are not subject to mandatory deportation. I hope the decision will serve as a strong warning to federal authorities to stop using laws intended to deport serious criminals to go after green card holders convicted of minor drug offenses. Tuesday's decision involves Adrian Moncrieffe, a Jamaican man who legally moved to the United States in 1984, when he was a three. In 2007, during a traffic stop police discovered about a small amount of marijuana in his car. He eventually pleaded guilty under Georgia law to possession with intent to distribute.
OPINION
May 25, 2011
The Supreme Court is different from lower federal courts, and not just because its rulings can't be appealed. Another difference is that its justices are exempt from the ethical standards imposed on judges in less lofty positions. That's an unjustifiable anomaly that Congress should rectify. The Code of Conduct for United States Judges was established by the U.S. Judicial Conference and covers all federal lower court judges. Among other things, the code says that "a judge should avoid impropriety and the appearance of impropriety in all activities.
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