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BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
American auto workers may not take pride in their products, but they're not lazy, according to an informal survey of auto industry executives. "Many have a poor attitude about work and building quality and are 'spoiled' by strong unions that protect slackers and discourage involvement in problem-solving," said the Ward's Auto World magazine survey of 500 automotive engineers, purchasing and corporate officials.
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BUSINESS
August 7, 2001 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corporate misery spiked in July as U.S. companies, led by the telecommunications and computer sectors, announced plans to cut 205,975 jobs--a 65% increase over June and more than three times as many as a year ago, according to an unofficial survey released Monday. The July total was the highest since the Chicago-based outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas began compiling the data in 1993.
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BUSINESS
July 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
U.S. labor costs rose more slowly last year than in all but one of the 11 countries that are major competitors of the United States, the Labor Department said Wednesday. The rise in U.S. labor costs--0.3% from 1987 to 1988--was dwarfed by increases such as 17% in Taiwan and 11.2% in South Korea. Of 11 countries for which the Bureau of Labor Statistics gave figures, only France recorded a decline, at 0.8%. While U.S.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roberto Chavez was 8 years old when he began fantasizing about the inevitable day he would follow his brother to the U.S., then return to his poor Mexican village smelling of money. What he did not know, in fact never could have imagined, was that the Los Angeles employer that helped him buy a home and raise five children would ship his job to Mexico after 15 years of loyal service.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the fifth floor of the Japan Productivity Center in Shibuya, Tamisaburo Sasaki stabbed a finger in the air and sputtered: "It's all misinformation!" All around him, the Japanese press, politicians and public have been perpetuating the image of lazy, inefficient and non-productive Americans. They paint a picture of America on the slippery slope of decline. Television flashes images of drugs and crime; newspapers spin out story after story on shoddy U.S. products.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Congress is nearing a classic showdown between liberals and conservatives over a bill to raise the federal minimum wage, unchanged at $3.35 an hour for more than seven years, to $5.05 by the beginning of 1992. The confrontation will occur 50 years after President Franklin D. Roosevelt won a long struggle to enact a 25-cent-an-hour minimum as one of the pillars of his New Deal plan to pull the nation out of the Great Depression.
NEWS
June 20, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Called unexpectedly to work late one evening, Michiko Kamiyama searched in vain for a baby-sitter for her 8-year-old daughter before grappling with a decision that bedevils countless working parents. In the end, she left the girl alone in the home. It turned out to be the wrong choice. Huntington Beach police took her daughter away that night, and Kamiyama, a widow who works as a singer and a waitress, was convicted of misdemeanor child abuse. She spent more than three months in jail.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1990 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual acknowledgement of a "people problem" at their manufacturing plants, Japanese managers in the United States said labor and personnel affairs are the most troublesome issues that they face, according to a new survey by a Japanese government agency. To date, most Japanese companies in the United States have shied away from publicly taking on workplace issues.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
For several months, a small-scale war has been raging between employees and management at McDonnell Douglas' Long Beach plant. A work slowdown by members of United Auto Workers Local 148, which represents 9,500 workers, has forced the company to delay deliveries of passenger planes to several airlines and prompted warnings by the company that recalcitrant workers could be fired. The dispute was ignited by contract changes McDonnell Douglas management had been seeking since October.
NEWS
August 19, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from President Clinton and businesses crippled by the near-shutdown of the nation's largest carrier of packaged goods, leaders of the Teamsters union and United Parcel Service said early today that they had reached a tentative agreement to end a 15-day-old nationwide strike. A full complement of the company's trademark brown delivery trucks could be back on the roads on Wednesday, officials said.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to build momentum for a new general amnesty, labor leaders gathered in Los Angeles on Friday to tout a longshot congressional bill that would eventually grant legal residency to the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants now in the United States. Rep. Luis V. Gutierrez (D-Ill.), who wrote HR 500, chose to kick off the national campaign for the bill in Los Angeles because it is "the backbone of social activism" in the United States, and the primary magnet for undocumented workers.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Republican-led Senate voted Tuesday to kill new rules that established the first federal standard for ergonomics in the workplace, and President Bush signaled he would support the regulatory rollback. The unusually rapid Senate action, following a brief and fiery partisan debate, elated business and enraged labor. The vote to nullify the rules was 56-44. The Republican-led House could follow suit as early as today.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2000 | From Reuters
U.S. wholesale prices rose in October amid climbing food and natural gas prices, the government said Thursday in a report that presented a mixed picture of inflation in the world's top economy. The Labor Department said its producer price index--a key measure of inflation at the wholesale level--rose 0.4%, less than half of September's 0.9% increase, which was largely driven by a spike in energy prices.
NEWS
October 2, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When mournful black clouds drifted high above the blazing carpet plant, workers feared it would be left to die, just one more name on the honor roll of U.S. factories abandoned in an era of savage global competition. But in this small Southern town, where entire families have toiled in textiles since the Civil War, the 1995 episode had a surprisingly happy ending.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jericho Ponce leaped at the chance three years ago to travel 6,000 miles for a modest technology job here that provided more money for his mother, grandmother and brothers back in the Philippines. "To get an opportunity to work in the States--everybody dreams of that," said Ponce, who is one of more than half a million immigrant workers lured to the United States over the last decade by technology companies.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A tip-off to the state of the American work force this Labor Day is that employee hiring is now a growing industry called human capital management and smart labor unions are training members to get better jobs at nonunion companies. Those are just two examples of the changing patterns of work that are behind the economy's surging productivity, with major implications for investment. Temporary work has become a permanent reality. Some 39 million workers, 30% of the U.S.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Liberals regularly gather in the living room of economist and publisher Stanley Sheinbaum's Brentwood home to raise money for "progressive" causes. So why on Earth was the guest of honor on a recent Saturday night the first announced candidate for the presidency of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters? This is, after all, the union that endorsed Richard M. Nixon and Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Law enforcement authorities say pension-fund officials who have little loyalty to their members are especially vulnerable to the sort of approach that Florida businessman Leonard J. Mercer Jr. used on his friend, Joseph J. Higgins. Mercer, a Ft. Lauderdale hotel owner, told Higgins that he needed $375,000 to purchase the Ta-Boo, a Palm Beach restaurant. Higgins had access to that much money and more.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Building on a burgeoning grass-roots movement that already has made inroads in Congress, labor and immigrant rights leaders will aggressively push their case for a new general amnesty at next week's Democratic convention. Immigrant workers and community activists plan to station themselves outside the daily gatherings of every state delegation and to relentlessly pester the dozens of federal legislators who will be in town.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A change in labor law Friday that will allow businesses to reclassify certain workers as managers has angered union leaders, who contend it could prevent thousands of workers from receiving daily overtime pay. The move allows businesses to more easily exempt employees from overtime wages by changing the critical definition of what constitutes a management employee.
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