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BUSINESS
December 31, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several years of modest but steady gains in membership and political clout, organized labor is bracing for potential setbacks under incoming Republican President George W. Bush. Unions poured money and energy into the campaign of Bush's Democratic rival, Vice President Al Gore, and stood behind Gore throughout vote recounts in Florida.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 2000 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several years of modest but steady gains in membership and political clout, organized labor is bracing for potential setbacks under incoming Republican President George W. Bush. Unions poured money and energy into the campaign of Bush's Democratic rival, Vice President Al Gore, and stood behind Gore throughout vote recounts in Florida.
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NEWS
February 21, 1995 | FRANK SWOBODA, THE WASHINGTON POST
Vice President Al Gore told leaders of the AFL-CIO on Monday that the President will sign an executive order banning the use of replacement workers by federal contractors in labor strikes. Gore announced the action at a closed-door meeting here with members of the federation's executive council. Both AFL-CIO and Clinton Administration officials said after the meeting that details of the order were still being worked out.
NEWS
May 26, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Democratic congressional leaders, yearning to recapture the House later this year, scrambled Thursday to repair their political relations with prominent labor leaders still smarting from this week's bipartisan approval of a controversial China trade bill.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Vice President Al Gore sought to cement the Clinton administration's occasionally rocky ties with the labor movement by delivering a rousing union-boosting speech at a Labor Day rally. "It's time for a new unionism," Gore said. "It's time for a new effort to organize working men and women in this country." Gore traveled to the banks of the Mississippi River to march in a parade and appear with AFL-CIO President John Sweeney and Labor Secretary Alexis M.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | FAYE FIORE and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a Republican victory destined for reversal by presidential veto, the Senate passed legislation Wednesday to curtail the power of organized labor by permitting companies to create worker-management teams to discuss workplace issues outside of union settings. Organized labor believes that the legislation, which gives legal status to an already widespread practice, would make it far more difficult to persuade employees to vote for union representation.
NEWS
May 26, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Democratic congressional leaders, yearning to recapture the House later this year, scrambled Thursday to repair their political relations with prominent labor leaders still smarting from this week's bipartisan approval of a controversial China trade bill.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
White House Won't Push for Striker Replacement Ban: The Clinton administration dropped legal efforts to revive its executive order banning most government contractors from hiring permanent replacements for striking workers. Officials at the Labor and Justice departments said the White House won't seek Supreme Court review of a lower-court ruling that threw out President Clinton's controversial striker-replacement policy. The administration had until today to file an appeal.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Eleven of the 12 nations in the European Community are rarities these days, as many other countries--including the United States and Great Britain--seek a competitive edge by slashing wages, benefits and jobs of their workers. The 11 are showing both good economic sense and humanitarian qualities by insisting that their workers must be helped, not hurt, by agreements to eliminate trade barriers and mesh the economies of the EC countries.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"From now on, ask not what labor can do for Democrats," says liberal labor historian Nelson Lichtenstein. "The question now is, what can Democrats do for labor." Allowing for a touch of bravado in this assessment, liberal analysts and labor strategists view this week's outcome of the UPS strike as an important symbolic victory for unions whose significance will extend beyond the bargaining table to the voting booth and Capitol Hill cloakrooms.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Vice President Al Gore sought to cement the Clinton administration's occasionally rocky ties with the labor movement by delivering a rousing union-boosting speech at a Labor Day rally. "It's time for a new unionism," Gore said. "It's time for a new effort to organize working men and women in this country." Gore traveled to the banks of the Mississippi River to march in a parade and appear with AFL-CIO President John Sweeney and Labor Secretary Alexis M.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"From now on, ask not what labor can do for Democrats," says liberal labor historian Nelson Lichtenstein. "The question now is, what can Democrats do for labor." Allowing for a touch of bravado in this assessment, liberal analysts and labor strategists view this week's outcome of the UPS strike as an important symbolic victory for unions whose significance will extend beyond the bargaining table to the voting booth and Capitol Hill cloakrooms.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Auto Workers and Ford Motor Co. reached a tentative three-year contract agreement Monday that includes a precedent-setting provision guaranteeing employment for 95% of the company's 104,000 hourly workers. The agreement came without a strike two days after expiration of the three-year contract. The deal is expected to serve as a labor relations framework for the domestic auto industry for several years. "We are pleased with it," Ford Chairman Alex Trotman said.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
White House Won't Push for Striker Replacement Ban: The Clinton administration dropped legal efforts to revive its executive order banning most government contractors from hiring permanent replacements for striking workers. Officials at the Labor and Justice departments said the White House won't seek Supreme Court review of a lower-court ruling that threw out President Clinton's controversial striker-replacement policy. The administration had until today to file an appeal.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | FAYE FIORE and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a Republican victory destined for reversal by presidential veto, the Senate passed legislation Wednesday to curtail the power of organized labor by permitting companies to create worker-management teams to discuss workplace issues outside of union settings. Organized labor believes that the legislation, which gives legal status to an already widespread practice, would make it far more difficult to persuade employees to vote for union representation.
NEWS
February 21, 1995 | FRANK SWOBODA, THE WASHINGTON POST
Vice President Al Gore told leaders of the AFL-CIO on Monday that the President will sign an executive order banning the use of replacement workers by federal contractors in labor strikes. Gore announced the action at a closed-door meeting here with members of the federation's executive council. Both AFL-CIO and Clinton Administration officials said after the meeting that details of the order were still being worked out.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before Republicans notched their smashing congressional election victories this week, organized labor's agenda wasn't getting far under the Clinton Administration. But now, experts say, things will get even worse for union backers. With newly won majorities in both the House and Senate, Republicans might be able to restrain workplace regulatory agencies that have become more aggressive under a Democratic President.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Auto Workers and Ford Motor Co. reached a tentative three-year contract agreement Monday that includes a precedent-setting provision guaranteeing employment for 95% of the company's 104,000 hourly workers. The agreement came without a strike two days after expiration of the three-year contract. The deal is expected to serve as a labor relations framework for the domestic auto industry for several years. "We are pleased with it," Ford Chairman Alex Trotman said.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before Republicans notched their smashing congressional election victories this week, organized labor's agenda wasn't getting far under the Clinton Administration. But now, experts say, things will get even worse for union backers. With newly won majorities in both the House and Senate, Republicans might be able to restrain workplace regulatory agencies that have become more aggressive under a Democratic President.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting strong concerns about employee privacy rights, a survey released Thursday shows that a vast majority of workers object to psychological tests and other efforts by their companies to pry into their personal lives. The national poll of 1,000 employees conducted by Louis Harris & Associates found that 69% oppose psychological exams that measure attitudes and social preferences, a form of testing that many employers use with job applicants.
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