Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Labor
IN THE NEWS

United States Labor

NEWS
April 15, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A program that lets hundreds of thousands of foreigners temporarily fill unique, high-skill U.S. jobs is lowering wages and pushing out American workers, a draft government audit says. Rather than helping U.S. businesses to better compete globally, the program has become a "rubber stamp" for both skilled and unskilled foreigners seeking to live and work in the U.S., said the report prepared for the Labor Department.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 1, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton recently proposed that companies offer paid "flex" time to nonexempt workers in lieu of overtime pay, he dived into a raging nationwide debate that could lead to dramatic changes in the nation's Depression-era work laws. The federal law, devised when Congress was scrambling to find ways to get people back to work and protect them from workplace abuses, has been changed only grudgingly since the 1930s.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Trendler, a true conservative by his own reckoning, fumes about welfare fraud and generally frowns on government interference in the marketplace. But when it comes to the minimum wage, the 41-year-old drug rehabilitation specialist from Philadelphia sounds a different tune. He'd like to see Congress aid the working poor by raising the federal pay minimum from $4.25 an hour. "I don't know of anyone trying to support a family who can get by on that," Trendler said.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1995 | From Associated Press
Productivity in the American workplace increased by a strong 3% annualized rate in the April-June quarter. The Labor Department said Tuesday that seasonally adjusted non-farm productivity gains in the second quarter bested the revised 2.5% rate for the first three months, although it trailed the 4.3% gain for the fourth quarter of 1994. "This is a very impressive performance for the quarter just ending," said economist Stephen S. Roach of Morgan Stanley & Co.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American employers kept getting more efficient during the summer and early fall, but their rate of productivity growth--a key barometer of economic performance--cooled off from the red-hot pace of earlier this year, the federal government reported Tuesday.
NEWS
September 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As major U.S. companies race to merge in a record flurry of multibillion-dollar transactions, the justifications for each deal are virtually identical: a desire for new synergies, a need to cut costs, a rush to reach a size that begets a greater sense of market control. But where does this leave the average American?
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich said Tuesday that the Clinton Administration's prospects in the 1996 election are clouded by the efforts of "demagogues" trying to convince average Americans that immigration, welfare, big government, affirmative action and free trade are to blame for their stagnating incomes. Reich said the impact of those polarizing issues, fanned by politicians, is "the one question mark hanging over 1996. . . . I worry about that." He didn't mention any politicians by name.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|