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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Eighty-five years after it was constructed, the once-deteriorating Watts train station was reborn Thursday. More than 100 people gathered at 103rd Street and Grandee Avenue to celebrate the grand reopening of the wood-frame structure, which will operate as a Department of Water and Power customer service office and a mini-museum of Watts history.
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NEWS
October 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Congress would support paying $170 million over the next decade to modernize the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, a national treasure that needs renovation, House Speaker Newt Gingrich said in Roswell. "It's one of those rare national institutions, and we'll be talking about spending something on the order of 8 cents or 7 cents a person every year for the next 10 years," he said on a visit to a senior citizens center in his district.
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NEWS
October 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Congress would support paying $170 million over the next decade to modernize the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, a national treasure that needs renovation, House Speaker Newt Gingrich said in Roswell. "It's one of those rare national institutions, and we'll be talking about spending something on the order of 8 cents or 7 cents a person every year for the next 10 years," he said on a visit to a senior citizens center in his district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Two truckers driving loads of new cars to dozens of U.S. cities last fall welcomed the opportunity to be teachers, and to see the sights--Old Faithful, the Alamo and Plymouth Rock--in a new way. Drivers Joe Barboa and Rivers Livous, of Auto Transport Co. in Gardena, learned the historical significance of the landmarks and reported back to a group of fifth-graders at Serrania Avenue Elementary School about what they saw.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California congressman on Thursday introduced a bill that would limit foreign ownership of entertainment companies and national landmarks, which he called an "ominous trend." Companies outside the United States would be prohibited from controlling more than half of the businesses devoted to such fields as motion picture and television production under the bill by Rep. Leon E. Panetta (D-Monterey).
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos joined gray-haired alumni and fifth-graders in Pilgrim outfits Friday to mark the 350th anniversary of the nation's oldest free school--made new for its birthday by an infusion of renovation funds. Cavazos said the refurbishing of Mather School, where morale had sagged as graffiti and other scars multiplied in the past decade, "speaks to the way our nation is getting together to address our education deficit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Two truckers driving loads of new cars to dozens of U.S. cities last fall welcomed the opportunity to be teachers, and to see the sights--Old Faithful, the Alamo and Plymouth Rock--in a new way. Drivers Joe Barboa and Rivers Livous, of Auto Transport Co. in Gardena, learned the historical significance of the landmarks and reported back to a group of fifth-graders at Serrania Avenue Elementary School about what they saw.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1992 | From Religious News Service
Religious and political leaders who have championed saving a colonial-era cemetery, widely regarded as one of the nation's most significant archeological sites for blacks, say the most compelling reason to preserve it is religious. Activists seeking to halt construction of a 34-story office tower at the 18th-Century site in lower Manhattan want the cemetery to be designated as both a city and a national landmark. They say the 400 burials and 1 million artifacts excavated so far are providing valuable information about African-American history, which had its beginnings in the church.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
"Everyone knows the first shots of the Civil War were fired here but few know anything else about Ft. Sumter," said National Park Service ranger David Ruth. Ruth, 34, who for eight years has been ranger in charge of interpretation at Ft. Sumter National Monument, was greeting a boatload of visitors to this 2 1/2-acre island in Charleston Harbor--where the Civil War began.
NATIONAL
August 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
A Pakistani man arrested while videotaping the 60-story Bank of America headquarters and other Charlotte skyscrapers will remain in custody after his lawyer declined to request bond Friday. Kamran Akhtar has been held on immigration charges and on charges that he made false statements to officers since his arrest July 20. Besides declining to request bond, lawyer George Miller also waived a probable cause hearing. "There's not much need to do that now," he said. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1992 | From Religious News Service
Religious and political leaders who have championed saving a colonial-era cemetery, widely regarded as one of the nation's most significant archeological sites for blacks, say the most compelling reason to preserve it is religious. Activists seeking to halt construction of a 34-story office tower at the 18th-Century site in lower Manhattan want the cemetery to be designated as both a city and a national landmark. They say the 400 burials and 1 million artifacts excavated so far are providing valuable information about African-American history, which had its beginnings in the church.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California congressman on Thursday introduced a bill that would limit foreign ownership of entertainment companies and national landmarks, which he called an "ominous trend." Companies outside the United States would be prohibited from controlling more than half of the businesses devoted to such fields as motion picture and television production under the bill by Rep. Leon E. Panetta (D-Monterey).
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos joined gray-haired alumni and fifth-graders in Pilgrim outfits Friday to mark the 350th anniversary of the nation's oldest free school--made new for its birthday by an infusion of renovation funds. Cavazos said the refurbishing of Mather School, where morale had sagged as graffiti and other scars multiplied in the past decade, "speaks to the way our nation is getting together to address our education deficit."
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
"Everyone knows the first shots of the Civil War were fired here but few know anything else about Ft. Sumter," said National Park Service ranger David Ruth. Ruth, 34, who for eight years has been ranger in charge of interpretation at Ft. Sumter National Monument, was greeting a boatload of visitors to this 2 1/2-acre island in Charleston Harbor--where the Civil War began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Eighty-five years after it was constructed, the once-deteriorating Watts train station was reborn Thursday. More than 100 people gathered at 103rd Street and Grandee Avenue to celebrate the grand reopening of the wood-frame structure, which will operate as a Department of Water and Power customer service office and a mini-museum of Watts history.
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