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NEWS
September 10, 1994 | from Reuters
The following is the text of a communique issued by the United States and Cuba on the exodus of Cuban refugees: Representatives of the United States of America and the Republic of Cuba (Friday) concluded talks concerning their mutual interest in normalizing migration procedures and agreed to take measures to ensure that migration between the two countries is safe, legal, and orderly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
For the first time, a federal appeals court has ruled that a U.S. government-instigated kidnapping of an individual from another country violates international human rights law and that violation can be redressed in a U.S. court. The 3-0 ruling this week by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco stems from the April 1990 abduction of Mexican physician Humberto Alvarez Machain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
For the first time, a federal appeals court has ruled that a U.S. government-instigated kidnapping of an individual from another country violates international human rights law and that violation can be redressed in a U.S. court. The 3-0 ruling this week by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco stems from the April 1990 abduction of Mexican physician Humberto Alvarez Machain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon is moving toward asking Congress to rewrite the Endangered Species Act and other laws so military training exercises can be exempted from restrictions to protect sea turtles, desert tortoises, shorebirds and other rare creatures. Military officials have said they would like more flexibility in environmental rules, in large part because of growing friction between those protections and training exercises on California's military bases, including Camp Pendleton, Ft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1996
U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter granted another delay in the sentencing of a Pacoima crack dealer on Monday, continuing a protest against federal sentencing laws. Hatter, a vocal critic of federal laws that set required prison terms for some defendants, has delayed sentencing Bobbie Marshall to a required nine years in prison since he was convicted in 1990 for possessing 53 grams of crack cocaine. "I refuse to be part of what I believe to be an injustice," Hatter said.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
Cybersquatting, the practice of registering an Internet domain name with the hopes of profiting due to its association with a trademark owned by someone else, can be punished by fines of between $1,000 and $100,000 under a law signed by President Clinton. The Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act seeks to stop people from registering Internet names that they will never use but hope to resell at inflated prices.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Nearly 1 in 5 young American men are failing to register for the military draft as required by law, risking fines and jail as well as ineligibility for a wide array of benefits, including student loans and government jobs, the Selective Service Administration said Wednesday. Agency officials said ignorance rather than willful resistance appears to be behind the compliance numbers, which were at 93% a decade ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter granted another delay in the sentencing of a Pacoima crack dealer Monday, continuing a protest against federal sentencing laws that he has claimed nullify judicial discretion. Hatter, a vocal critic of federal laws that set required prison terms for some defendants, has delayed sentencing Bobbie Marshall to 9 years in prison since he was convicted in 1990 of possessing 53 grams of crack cocaine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon is moving toward asking Congress to rewrite the Endangered Species Act and other laws so military training exercises can be exempted from restrictions to protect sea turtles, desert tortoises, shorebirds and other rare creatures. Military officials have said they would like more flexibility in environmental rules, in large part because of growing friction between those protections and training exercises on California's military bases, including Camp Pendleton, Ft.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Michael A. Hiltzik, David Willman, Alan C. Miller, Eric Malnic, Peter Pae, Ralph Frammolino and Russell Carollo
As 19 hijackers made their way along the concourses at three East Coast airports on Sept. 11, bent on executing the deadliest terrorist attack in history, they were subjecting the U.S. aviation security system to its most critical test. At almost every step along the way, the system posed no challenge to the terrorists--not to their ability to purchase tickets, to pass security checkpoints while carrying knives and cutting implements nor to board aircraft.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Nearly 1 in 5 young American men are failing to register for the military draft as required by law, risking fines and jail as well as ineligibility for a wide array of benefits, including student loans and government jobs, the Selective Service Administration said Wednesday. Agency officials said ignorance rather than willful resistance appears to be behind the compliance numbers, which were at 93% a decade ago.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1999 | TED HAMPTON, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Insurer American International Group Inc., the largest U.S. insurer by market value, sued Cigna Corp. and a former unit, claiming they broke California law by establishing a separate division to limit losses from pollution and asbestos claims. The unit, Insurance Company of North America, or INA, was sold by Cigna to Ace Ltd., a Bermuda-based insurer, in July for $3.45 billion. INA had transferred its policies into Century Indemnity Co., a part of the Brandywine Holdings Corp.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
Cybersquatting, the practice of registering an Internet domain name with the hopes of profiting due to its association with a trademark owned by someone else, can be punished by fines of between $1,000 and $100,000 under a law signed by President Clinton. The Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act seeks to stop people from registering Internet names that they will never use but hope to resell at inflated prices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1996
U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter granted another delay in the sentencing of a Pacoima crack dealer on Monday, continuing a protest against federal sentencing laws. Hatter, a vocal critic of federal laws that set required prison terms for some defendants, has delayed sentencing Bobbie Marshall to a required nine years in prison since he was convicted in 1990 for possessing 53 grams of crack cocaine. "I refuse to be part of what I believe to be an injustice," Hatter said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter granted another delay in the sentencing of a Pacoima crack dealer Monday, continuing a protest against federal sentencing laws that he has claimed nullify judicial discretion. Hatter, a vocal critic of federal laws that set required prison terms for some defendants, has delayed sentencing Bobbie Marshall to 9 years in prison since he was convicted in 1990 of possessing 53 grams of crack cocaine.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | from Reuters
The following is the text of a communique issued by the United States and Cuba on the exodus of Cuban refugees: Representatives of the United States of America and the Republic of Cuba (Friday) concluded talks concerning their mutual interest in normalizing migration procedures and agreed to take measures to ensure that migration between the two countries is safe, legal, and orderly.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1999 | TED HAMPTON, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Insurer American International Group Inc., the largest U.S. insurer by market value, sued Cigna Corp. and a former unit, claiming they broke California law by establishing a separate division to limit losses from pollution and asbestos claims. The unit, Insurance Company of North America, or INA, was sold by Cigna to Ace Ltd., a Bermuda-based insurer, in July for $3.45 billion. INA had transferred its policies into Century Indemnity Co., a part of the Brandywine Holdings Corp.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1986
Jim Dean, former editor of the Orange County Register, has been named managing editor of United States Law News, a new weekly law publication based in San Juan Capistrano. Dean, who was editor of the Register for 18 years, left the Santa Ana-based newspaper in 1981 to form his own company and publish Orange County Business Line, the official newspaper of the Orange County Chamber of Commerce. He is in the process of selling his company, the Jim Dean Organization Inc., to associates.
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