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NEWS
November 17, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force is quietly seeking a legal way to move its Ballistic Systems Division out of San Bernardino, The Times has learned, even though Congress enacted a law earlier this year specifically saying that it should remain at its present location.
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BUSINESS
December 2, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Adee, a South Dakota beekeeper, credits an obscure U.S. trade law with keeping him alive in the cutthroat world of honey, where prices are slashed and supplies are allegedly dumped in search of sweet profit. "The law saved the honey industry," Adee, a second-generation honey producer, said. "We've had a lot of our beekeepers go out of business." For Hans Boedeker, a Tustin, Calif., honey importer, that same law spells doom: "These laws are very arbitrary. There was no dumping of honey."
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BUSINESS
November 7, 1989 | ALBERT B. CRENSHAW, WASHINGTON POST
In writing the Tax Reform Act of 1986, Congress devoted a lot of time to closing loopholes for the rich. One that was given particularly harsh treatment was the "generation-skipping transfer," a once-common device by which wealthy people shifted assets to their grandchildren, thereby cutting out one level of estate tax. But nobody loves a loophole as much as Congress.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert D. McConnell, a Manhattan Beach retiree, has spent hours trying to protect his personal financial privacy--and little good it's done him. After plowing through dozens of pages of fine print, he sent a so-called opt-out notice to Bank of America, saying he didn't want the bank sharing or selling his account information. It was returned by the post office, with no forwarding address. "I'm left with no place to send my opt-out notice," he fumes.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
States are moving to outlaw marital rape, the act of sexually assaulting one's spouse. During the 1991 legislative session, four more states--South Carolina, Missouri, New Mexico and Utah--enacted laws making spousal rape a crime. That leaves only two--North Carolina and Oklahoma--with laws that enable a defendant to use the fact that he is married to the victim as an absolute defense against the charge of rape.
NEWS
July 27, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Levon Dumont, a free-spirited Santa Cruz teen-ager whose principal passion was the Grateful Dead, was on his way to a concert on Sept. 14, 1989, when he was stopped by an undercover agent at the Milwaukee airport. Dumont's bag was searched, and agents found about three grams of LSD, an illegal hallucinogen. Today, Dumont is serving a 15-year, 8-month sentence at the Federal Correctional Institution in Sheridan, Ore.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Legal Affairs Writer
Kong Moua, a Hmong tribesman from the hills of Laos, drove to the Fresno City College campus looking for his intended bride. Locating her at her job in the student finance office, he spirited her away to his cousin's house. Kong Moua called it zij poj niam, or "marriage by capture," in his culture an accepted form of matrimony akin to elopement. However, his "bride," also a Hmong but more assimilated into American culture, called it kidnaping and rape. She also called the police.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Clemente teen-ager accused of brutally beating a man on a Laguna Beach strip frequented by gays was charged with a hate crime after police learned he allegedly boasted of his eagerness to attack a homosexual. But in a fatal attack five months earlier, Orange County prosecutors never considered filing a hate-crime charge against a Cypress man accused in the murder and robbery of a Santa Ana attorney--despite a witness' claim that the defendant had planned to target a gay man.
NEWS
March 9, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sergio Infanzon, an illegal immigrant for a decade, decided last month to roll the dice: He turned himself in to the Border Patrol. It was self-interest that motivated this gambit, however, and immigration authorities in Los Angeles and San Diego were not inclined to play along. Infanzon had to travel four hours to El Centro to find agents willing to collar him.
NEWS
November 29, 1988
Colombian-born Eucaris Ceballos, believed to be the first woman convicted under the new federal drug kingpin law, was sentenced in Trenton, N.J., to life imprisonment and fined more than $4 million on charges she ran a multimillion dollar cocaine ring in New Jersey and New York.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2001 | ANDREW CLARK, REUTERS
New U.S. financial privacy rules that took effect Sunday mark a milestone for the financial industry and consumers, but they are by no means the final word in the heated privacy debate. Sunday was the deadline for U.S. banks, brokers, insurers and a host of other companies providing financial services to be in compliance with new privacy protections included in a landmark 1999 banking law.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through their different political, economic and legal lenses, U.S. and European antitrust regulators occasionally see the risks and rewards of mergers very differently. Nowhere is that difference more visible than in the proposed linking of General Electric Co. and Honeywell Inc.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move expected to fuel transatlantic tensions, a World Trade Organization panel has decided that a U.S. tax law designed to help the nation's largest exporters violated international rules governing free trade. If the interim WTO decision is allowed to stand in next month's final report, the European Union could impose as much as $4 billion in sanctions on U.S. exports next year. U.S. Trade Representative Robert B.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
An appeals court struck down a policy Wednesday that had allowed federal officials to delay decisions on whether to list species as endangered. Under the Endangered Species Act, members of the public can recommend that certain species be listed as endangered and granted federal protection. The law says officials must decide on the recommendations within a year. But a panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Weylin Etra had spent more than two years at a private school in Santa Monica when his teacher and parents spotted some serious physical and learning problems. His parents had him assessed at their local Los Angeles Unified School District campus, and within months Weylin began receiving weekly occupational therapy and special education classes--all courtesy of the district and even as he continued happily to attend private school.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2001 | KATHERINE RIZZO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A trade battle is shaping up over a law that lets U.S. companies pocket tens of millions of dollars in fines that the government collects from foreign competitors. Foreign governments say the law violates trade agreements and they have started proceedings against the United States in the World Trade Organization. If they win, they could cripple U.S. companies' ability to compete abroad by imposing duties of their own on U.S. goods.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a dusty strip of auto body shops and plumbing suppliers in the San Fernando Valley is a little-known company that occupies one of the most embattled, contradictory and profitable corners of the Internet. For thousands of online porn sites, Cybernet Ventures Inc. is a meal ticket, a source of millions of dollars in revenue. For the government, it is a potential solution to the Internet pornography problem.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heeding the cries of scholars trying to unlock the secrets of Mayan civilization, the United States announced a ban Thursday on importation of antique artifacts from the famed Peten region of Guatemala, one of the richest and most plundered archeological sites in the world. Eugene P. Kopp, acting director of the U.S. Information Agency, said the ban would "help save the remnants of Mayan civilization from further destruction."
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The Bush administration has decided to let stand a Clinton administration regulation protecting 60 million acres of national forest from logging and road construction, but with the intention of reopening the rule-making process for possible significant changes in the future.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorneys for accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen charged Wednesday that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft violated the Justice Department's own guidelines by publicly threatening to consider the death penalty against the former FBI agent to coerce a plea bargain. Justice Department guidelines ban the government from using the death penalty to leverage its position in plea negotiations.
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