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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
To the owner of Eldorado Colleges, his students' loss of federal financial aid was the result of overzealous bureaucrats who unfairly forced the chain of vocational schools to close this week, in the process cutting loose 800 students who were learning skills to land a good job.
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BUSINESS
October 7, 1996 | AMY HARMON
When is child pornography that doesn't involve children still child pornography? In the United States, that would be now, under a new law that bans computer-generated images of children engaged in sexual acts. Folded into the government spending bill that went into effect last week, the Child Pornography Prevention Act of 1996 makes possession of such material punishable by up to five years in prison--more for repeat offenders. Producers and distributors would face up to 30 years in jail.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a series of remarkably consistent decisions, courts have been blocking state laws that ban so-called partial-birth abortions almost as fast as the states have enacted them. With Congress having failed twice to pass a national ban over President Clinton's veto, more than half the states (California not among them) have enacted such laws.
NEWS
December 12, 1995 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting Sunday, the maximum speed limit on about 2,800 miles of freeway in California will be increased to 65 mph from 55 mph, it was learned Monday. Another 1,400 miles are candidates for 70 mph, beginning in January. All the major freeways in Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura and Riverside counties will increase to 65 mph, except for some of the busiest freeways through Downtown Los Angeles and parts of the South Bay, Pasadena and San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
September 26, 1996 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For eight years, on a triangular lot in a shabby neighborhood, an abstract steel sculpture was reflected in the adjacent canal, which in turn delivered sunlight to glint off the piece's planes and edges. Jan Randolph Martin, an artist, businessman and musician, regarded the creation as his masterpiece. The Indianapolis municipal government saw "Symphony No.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thanks to the efforts of the National Rifle Assn., nearly everyone knows that the Second Amendment speaks of "the right of the people to keep and bear arms." It is less known, however, that no federal court has ever struck down a gun control law based on the Second Amendment. While the principle remains popular that every law-abiding person has the right to own a gun, most legal experts say the Second Amendment is something of a dead letter.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1993 | MONICA YANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting this week, purchasers of new TV sets will have another technological feature available to them: Reading television will be as easy as a flip of the switch. A federal law that takes effect Thursday requires television manufacturers to equip all new sets 13 inches or larger with built-in capability to display captions, or subtitles, if the viewer wants them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1992 | AJOWA IFATEYO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Santa Ana men face federal indictments for allegedly selling cocaine to an undercover agent near Willard Intermediate School, authorities are expected to announce today at a press conference. U.S. Atty. Paul Seaves refused to provide details about the federal charges against the two men, including their names, but said the indictments were part of an effort "to clean up a particular area near a school where drugs were being sold. "This is Santa Ana's initiative," he said.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American cowboy, that lanky, leather-faced, bowlegged archetype of the West, is a vanishing breed. From the Texas Panhandle to Montana's Big Sky country, frustrated cattle ranchers say the once-ample supply of savvy, reliable cowhands has plumb dried up. "Finding a good cowpuncher is darn near impossible these days," griped Lynn Anderson, a lifelong cattleman with a ranch outside Kingman, Ariz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerardo Anthony Mosquera Jr. was a good boy in a tough neighborhood, his parents say. He took his studies seriously, enjoyed sports, stayed away from drugs and worked after school to help support his struggling family, which included three younger siblings and an infant son.
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