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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2001 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County-based immigration reform group plans to lobby the Anaheim City Council today in an effort to gain the authority for local police officers to arrest suspected illegal immigrants. If the U.S. attorney general's office approves, Anaheim could become the first city in the nation to use a little-known federal law that allows local police agencies to arrest people under federal immigration laws.
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NEWS
January 19, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON and PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President-elect George W. Bush on Thursday dismissed the price caps sought by Gov. Gray Davis as a way out of California's deepening electricity crisis, and instead proposed relaxing environmental rules that he said keep the state's power plants from running full tilt.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide whether longtime legal immigrants to the United States can be deported without legal recourse if they had committed a serious crime in the past. A ruling on the issue is due by the summer and could affect several thousand pending cases. In 1996, Congress, newly under Republican control, sought to crack down on immigrants--including those who were here legally--by restricting government benefits and making it easier to deport those who commit crimes.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | SUSAN REIMER, BALTIMORE SUN
It is basketball season and it is wrestling season, and I have a basketball player and a wrestler under my roof. For the next three months, it will be necessary for me to be at two different gyms at once after traveling all over the county in opposite directions. Oh yeah. And I have a job. I have responded to the logistical challenges this season will present by declaring that I will have to take family leave. I am only half kidding, but the idea of actually taking family leave is a joke.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
The Clinton administration will issue a new rule today to make it harder for companies that have violated labor, tax or other federal laws to win government contracts, the Office of Management and Budget said Tuesday. The regulation, dubbed the "blacklisting" rule by industry critics, will take effect Jan. 19, one day before President Clinton's administration turns over the White House to Republican President-elect George W. Bush.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2000 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Defying the threat of a presidential veto, the Senate on Thursday easily approved a measure to toughen bankruptcy laws, making it harder for consumers to wipe out their debts. The bill passed on a 70-to-28 vote, more than the two-thirds margin needed to override a veto by President Clinton. The House passed the bill in October on a voice vote.
NEWS
December 2, 2000
There were numerous references at Friday's Supreme Court hearing to "3 U.S.C., 5" or "3 U.S.C." or simply "Section 5." The lawyers and justices were referring to Title 3 of the U.S. Code, Section 5, which states that any election dispute must be resolved in accordance with laws enacted prior to election day. The law: * TITLE 3 THE PRESIDENT * CHAPTER 1--PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS AND VACANCIES * Section 5.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | From Reuters
President Clinton announced initiatives Thursday to help local police keep guns out of the hands of felons, stepping up pressure on the Republican-led Congress to close loopholes in the nation's gun laws before he leaves office in January. Marking the seventh anniversary of the Brady law, which requires handgun sellers to make background checks and institute waiting periods for buyers, Clinton directed Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers and Atty. Gen.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
A North American Free Trade Agreement panel rejected a U.S. law limiting Mexican trucks' access to the U.S. market, dealing a blow to the Teamsters' bid to halt the trucks at the border, a Mexican official said. Although the Clinton administration wouldn't comment, saying the ruling isn't final, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters called on the White House to maintain the 5-year-old limit.
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