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NEWS
December 20, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
The Clinton administration will issue a new rule today to make it harder for companies that have violated labor, tax or other federal laws to win government contracts, the Office of Management and Budget said Tuesday. The regulation, dubbed the "blacklisting" rule by industry critics, will take effect Jan. 19, one day before President Clinton's administration turns over the White House to Republican President-elect George W. Bush.
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BUSINESS
December 8, 2000 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Defying the threat of a presidential veto, the Senate on Thursday easily approved a measure to toughen bankruptcy laws, making it harder for consumers to wipe out their debts. The bill passed on a 70-to-28 vote, more than the two-thirds margin needed to override a veto by President Clinton. The House passed the bill in October on a voice vote.
NEWS
December 2, 2000
There were numerous references at Friday's Supreme Court hearing to "3 U.S.C., 5" or "3 U.S.C." or simply "Section 5." The lawyers and justices were referring to Title 3 of the U.S. Code, Section 5, which states that any election dispute must be resolved in accordance with laws enacted prior to election day. The law: * TITLE 3 THE PRESIDENT * CHAPTER 1--PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS AND VACANCIES * Section 5.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | From Reuters
President Clinton announced initiatives Thursday to help local police keep guns out of the hands of felons, stepping up pressure on the Republican-led Congress to close loopholes in the nation's gun laws before he leaves office in January. Marking the seventh anniversary of the Brady law, which requires handgun sellers to make background checks and institute waiting periods for buyers, Clinton directed Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers and Atty. Gen.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
A North American Free Trade Agreement panel rejected a U.S. law limiting Mexican trucks' access to the U.S. market, dealing a blow to the Teamsters' bid to halt the trucks at the border, a Mexican official said. Although the Clinton administration wouldn't comment, saying the ruling isn't final, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters called on the White House to maintain the 5-year-old limit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill that removes the final barrier to U.S. citizenship for many people with severe disabilities has been signed into law by President Clinton. The law could help thousands of disabled people who would qualify for citizenship if not for the fact that they cannot recite the oath of allegiance, said Micheal Hill, a lobbyist for the country's Catholic bishops in Washington D.C. The bill, introduced by Rep.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
A new federal rule announced Thursday could limit logging, skiing or hiking in national forests if forest managers believe those activities might permanently harm the ecosystem. The policy change requires that managers overseeing 192 million acres of 155 forests put ecosystem health above all other concerns. "We cannot do things that could put resources at risk," said Jim Lyons, the Agriculture Department undersecretary who oversees the Forest Service.
NEWS
October 29, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In session for rare weekend votes with the election fast approaching, Congress acted Saturday to keep the government running for another 24 hours but made little apparent progress in breaking a budget impasse. Despite the action of the House and the Senate on the eighth stopgap spending measure since the fiscal year began Oct. 1, a weird limbo enveloped the Capitol as neither Republicans nor Democrats predicted a quick deal. Gone for the time being was the usual year-end pressure to adjourn.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant shift for their party, key congressional Republicans proposed Wednesday to make it easier for hundreds of thousands of people who entered the United States illegally before 1982 to gain permanent U.S. residence. Republicans also proposed issuing as many as 600,000 special new visas over three years to foreign-born spouses and children of legal immigrants in an initiative to help families stay together in the United States.
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