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NEWS
December 24, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Melding theology, politics and policy, President Clinton delivered a Christmastime lecture Wednesday on nothing less than the meaning of life--and the federal budget. Alternately buoyant and nearly prayerful during his first post-impeachment public appearance, Clinton said he would seek $1.125 billion for homeless assistance in the budget he will unveil next year. That would amount to a 15% increase in federal spending for the homeless.
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NEWS
December 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Clinton said Wednesday that he plans to send Congress suggestions next week on how to fix a law aimed at cutting prescription drug prices by allowing them to be reimported from abroad. "What we'd like to see is a law that protects safety that will lower consumer prices," said Clinton, a day after Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala blocked the law's implementation. The drug reimportation law would let drugstores and medical distributors buy U.S.
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NEWS
October 12, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the plan was unveiled two weeks ago, it was touted as a partial remedy for high prescription drug prices: U.S.-made medications shipped to countries with price controls would be brought back to America and sold at a discount here. But by the time it received final House approval Wednesday, the legislation was so riddled with potential loopholes that even some of its most ardent opponents acknowledged privately they could no longer tell what, if anything, it would do.
NEWS
October 12, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the plan was unveiled two weeks ago, it was touted as a partial remedy for high prescription drug prices: U.S.-made medications shipped to countries with price controls would be brought back to America and sold at a discount here. But by the time it received final House approval Wednesday, the legislation was so riddled with potential loopholes that even some of its most ardent opponents acknowledged privately they could no longer tell what, if anything, it would do.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A changed America was on view last week as measures to lower capital gains and inheritance taxes, while granting tax credits for education and child care, were introduced in Washington. The tax proposals are important for what they say about the U.S. economy--especially in a week in which the stock market took yet another great leap upward. For the economy is tied more than ever to the stock market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1997 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayors and county executives from Los Angeles and other metropolitan areas used this reception center for 12 million immigrants as a backdrop Tuesday to protest Congress' decision to withdraw federal welfare benefits from aged and disabled immigrants who entered and remain in the country legally but never obtained citizenship. "These are people who played by the rules," said New York City Mayor Rudolph W.
NEWS
February 2, 1995
Here is how members of the California delegation voted on the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act, which passed the House, 360 to 74.
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate struck a bipartisan deal paving the way for passage of legislation to tighten registration and disclosure requirements for lobbyists. But it remained divided over companion legislation to bar lawmakers from accepting free meals, trips and other favors from lobbyists--and sharply limit gifts from other sources--and faces a struggle over that matter. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
While the spotlight in Washington is concentrated on the battle over the federal debt ceiling, House and Senate leaders continue to hammer out a compromise plan for promised tax cuts within the context of a balanced budget by 2002. "We have come up with a very good compromise and it will be announced [today]," Senate Budget Chairman Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.) said on CNN's "Late Edition."
BUSINESS
November 29, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Conferees OK Compromise Securities Lawsuit Measure: A House and Senate conference committee approved a compromise measure to restrict class-action securities fraud lawsuits against businesses, bringing the highly controversial measure a step closer to President Clinton's desk. The complex bill contains several provisions to deter meritless lawsuits.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prospects for expanding federal hate crime laws to include sexual orientation, gender and disability dimmed Monday when congressional Republicans stripped the provision from a spending bill.
NEWS
December 24, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Melding theology, politics and policy, President Clinton delivered a Christmastime lecture Wednesday on nothing less than the meaning of life--and the federal budget. Alternately buoyant and nearly prayerful during his first post-impeachment public appearance, Clinton said he would seek $1.125 billion for homeless assistance in the budget he will unveil next year. That would amount to a 15% increase in federal spending for the homeless.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The federal government is entitled to a major share of any of the bounty that states have recovered in lawsuits against the tobacco industry for Medicaid expenses for sick smokers, according to a study released Friday by a Washington public-interest organization. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities also said that the federal government would be entitled to a large chunk of the money if Congress enacts legislation embodying the proposed $368.5-billion national tobacco settlement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | States News Service
A bill unveiled Thursday by the chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee would mean more federal dollars for California freeways over the next three years. Should the measure pass, Orange County would reap a share of the $6.6 billion earmarked for the state in increased highway and air-quality funds, as well as money for mass transit. Under the bill introduced by Rep. Bud Shuster (R-Pa.), the state would get nearly $2 billion in 1998--an 18% increase over last year.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A changed America was on view last week as measures to lower capital gains and inheritance taxes, while granting tax credits for education and child care, were introduced in Washington. The tax proposals are important for what they say about the U.S. economy--especially in a week in which the stock market took yet another great leap upward. For the economy is tied more than ever to the stock market.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Balking at the multibillion-dollar cost of deploying digital television, disgruntled broadcasters this week are quietly making last-ditch appeals to Congress and federal regulators to delay introduction of the eagerly awaited technology.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
FCC Accepts Hearing-Aid Proposal for Phones: If approved by the Federal Communications Commission after a comment period, the rules would eventually require that phones in workplaces, nursing homes, hospitals, hotels and motels be hearing-aid compatible. About 6 million Americans use hearing aids. Companies would not be required to immediately retrofit or replace existing telephones, as had been proposed previously.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Greenspan Warns of Higher Interest Costs: A failure by Congress to reach a balanced-budget agreement could lead to a "sharp increase" in the cost of mortgages and other interest rates, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said. "I think the reaction could be quite negative" in the financial markets, Greenspan said at a Senate Banking Committee hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1997 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayors and county executives from Los Angeles and other metropolitan areas used this reception center for 12 million immigrants as a backdrop Tuesday to protest Congress' decision to withdraw federal welfare benefits from aged and disabled immigrants who entered and remain in the country legally but never obtained citizenship. "These are people who played by the rules," said New York City Mayor Rudolph W.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Securities and Exchange Commission's efforts to police about 5,300 small brokerage firms would be hampered by a provision in a bill signed by President Clinton, officials said. Attached to the so-called debt ceiling bill is a measure, originally part of the Republican's "contract with America," that gives new authority for small businesses to challenge federal regulations in court.
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