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July 2, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
In one of the most closely held U.S. intelligence and military programs of the last decade, the United States has covertly trained counterterrorism squads in dozens of countries in the Middle East, Africa, Asia and Latin America. The United States has turned to training foreign forces as proxies because of the legal, political and logistical difficulties in deploying its own counterterrorism units overseas.
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NEWS
April 5, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
When President Clinton released the new figures Friday showing unemployment had dropped to a 29-year low, he ironically underscored a critical element of his political problem in Kosovo. This has been a decade when very little has gone wrong for America. In domestic life, virtually every economic and social trend, from unemployment to teen pregnancy, is moving in the right direction. The only thing rising faster than the federal budget surplus is the stock market.
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NEWS
April 5, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
When President Clinton released the new figures Friday showing unemployment had dropped to a 29-year low, he ironically underscored a critical element of his political problem in Kosovo. This has been a decade when very little has gone wrong for America. In domestic life, virtually every economic and social trend, from unemployment to teen pregnancy, is moving in the right direction. The only thing rising faster than the federal budget surplus is the stock market.
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | THOMAS W. LIPPMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Directed by Congress to pursue more vigorous efforts to bring down Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, the Clinton administration has responded with a detailed, 27-page plan to rebuild Iraq's shattered political opposition and prepare a case for a possible war crimes indictment of Iraqi leaders.
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | THOMAS W. LIPPMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Directed by Congress to pursue more vigorous efforts to bring down Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, the Clinton administration has responded with a detailed, 27-page plan to rebuild Iraq's shattered political opposition and prepare a case for a possible war crimes indictment of Iraqi leaders.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate-House negotiators approved a compromise bill Wednesday that would give the Defense Department extra money to help pay for U.S. military operations abroad but would force the Pentagon to make up most of the increase by cutting other defense programs. After weeks of delay, the conference committee voted to provide $3.1 billion to cover unexpected costs of operations in Haiti and other trouble spots, about $500 million more than the Pentagon had requested early this year.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, chastened by its flawed efforts to make or keep peace in Somalia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Haiti, has completed a long-delayed, oft-revised policy governing U.S. participation in peacekeeping operations around the globe. The new policy sets numerous, stringent conditions, with U.S. involvement in international peacekeeping to become "more selective and more effective" as a result, according to White House National Security Adviser Anthony Lake.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate refused Thursday to limit President Clinton's authority as commander in chief by forbidding him to dispatch troops to Haiti. But in what most lawmakers described as a "warning signal" to the White House, the lawmakers also voted overwhelmingly to request that Clinton consult with the Senate more closely before deciding on any military intervention--in Haiti or elsewhere.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Libya is seeking an emergency Security Council meeting to discuss the U.S. airlift from Chad of 600 Libyans allegedly trained by America to destabilize Libya's ruler, Col. Moammar Kadafi. No date has been set for the meeting, which Libyan Ambassador Ali Treiki requested in a letter to the council released Monday. On Sunday, Libyan Foreign Minister Ibrahim Mohammed Bashari said of the evacuated Libyan former prisoners of war: "They were taken hostage because they have a lot of information.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stunning decision to roughly double the U.S. deployment in the Persian Gulf allows for a range of offensive strikes on multiple fronts that would have been impossible with the current 238,000 U.S. troops, defense officials said Thursday. The move represents an acknowledgement that Iraq cannot be defeated by air power alone and that large numbers of tanks, artillery, infantry and Marines will be required to break through elaborate Iraqi defenses if a war is launched.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate-House negotiators approved a compromise bill Wednesday that would give the Defense Department extra money to help pay for U.S. military operations abroad but would force the Pentagon to make up most of the increase by cutting other defense programs. After weeks of delay, the conference committee voted to provide $3.1 billion to cover unexpected costs of operations in Haiti and other trouble spots, about $500 million more than the Pentagon had requested early this year.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, chastened by its flawed efforts to make or keep peace in Somalia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Haiti, has completed a long-delayed, oft-revised policy governing U.S. participation in peacekeeping operations around the globe. The new policy sets numerous, stringent conditions, with U.S. involvement in international peacekeeping to become "more selective and more effective" as a result, according to White House National Security Adviser Anthony Lake.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate refused Thursday to limit President Clinton's authority as commander in chief by forbidding him to dispatch troops to Haiti. But in what most lawmakers described as a "warning signal" to the White House, the lawmakers also voted overwhelmingly to request that Clinton consult with the Senate more closely before deciding on any military intervention--in Haiti or elsewhere.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration foreign policy strategists, seeking to redefine America's priorities in a post-Cold War world, are quietly streamlining U.S. involvement in--or withdrawing altogether from--areas where Washington once expended considerable influence and money. The process, called "prioritization" by one senior strategist, is among the key assignments facing policy planning staffs at the State Department, Pentagon and National Security Council, Administration sources say.
NEWS
July 27, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defying a veto threat, the Senate Friday approved a $28-billion foreign aid bill that would overturn an Administration ban on funding for private organizations that promote abortion counseling overseas. After several days of complex maneuvering and Republican filibustering, the chamber sidestepped unresolved differences over military aid to El Salvador and two abortion-related issues to pass its first foreign aid authorization bill in six years, 74 to 18.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration sent Congress its first official bill for the Persian Gulf War on Friday when it asked for $15 billion in spending authority to pay for Operation Desert Storm and said all the money may not be needed if the war ends quickly. The Administration said allied pledges of financial assistance for the U.S. military now total $53.5 billion and should cover all but $15 billion of the war's costs--even if combat continues until March 31.
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | From the Times Washington Staff
CAMPAIGN FALLOUT: Administration aides say that President Bush is serious about not making any major change in his Cabinet after the election, despite the debacle over the budget that Republican candidates complain is contributing to their dimmed prospects this year. White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, criticized for his handling of the budget negotiations, apparently is safe. Bush aides say that replacing him would probably be seen as a sign of weakness on the President's part.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration began asking its major economic allies Tuesday for at least $25 billion to help defray America's military expenses in the Persian Gulf and to aid countries that have been hit hard by the global trade embargo on Iraq and Kuwait. On orders from President Bush, Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady led a delegation of top officials on a whirlwind tour to meet with leaders of France, Britain, South Korea and Japan to discuss the U.S. request.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States and its allies will not launch a ground attack against Iraqi positions in Kuwait until "absolutely certain that we have gained everything we can from the air campaign," Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said Sunday. Although roughly half a million U.S. troops will be "combat ready" before the end of February, "there is no reason for us to rush into a ground conflict that would mean unnecessary American and allied casualties," Cheney said.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the U.N. deadline for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait just over a week away, Secretary of State James A. Baker III hinted Sunday that he will give Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz dramatic new evidence of allied military prowess when they meet Wednesday in Geneva. "We think that this will get the job done, in terms of getting the message home," Baker said, although he declined to spell out how he could strengthen the often-repeated warning to Iraq to get out of Kuwait or face military force.
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