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United States Military Aid Afghanistan

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September 28, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze called Tuesday for a special U.N. Security Council meeting to ensure compliance with the Afghan peace accords and hinted that the Soviet Union might suspend its troop withdrawal if the United States and Pakistan do not end military aid to rebels fighting to oust the Moscow-backed government. In a speech to the U.N.
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NEWS
September 19, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dug into the dusty ridgeline at Afghan Army Post No. 9, 1,000 feet above this strategic choke point 27 miles south of Kabul, stands the only semblance of control in this rugged, war-ravaged countryside. It is the first critical line of defense for the embattled regime of Afghan President Najibullah, whose forces now are faced for the first time with fighting a 13-year-old civil war on their own.
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NEWS
July 17, 1987 | Associated Press
Soviet servicemen in Afghanistan have suffered heavier casualties since the United States began supplying modern weapons to Muslim guerrillas, a Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman said Thursday. Those weapons "created additional difficulties for Afghan army and Soviet troops," deputy spokesman Boris Pyadyshev said at a regular government briefing. "This led to additional casualties among Afghan and Soviet troops and the air force."
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | Reuters
The Soviet-backed Afghan government said Saturday it is ready to stop the war against Western-supported guerrillas and endorsed Friday's U.S.-Soviet agreement to halt all weapons supplies to the warring sides by Jan. 1. But radical Muslim guerrillas said they will continue fighting to topple President Najibullah's government in Kabul. Afghan Premier Fazlul Haq Khaleqyar has "expressed full readiness to ensure peace and cessation of the war as well as implementation of the Soviet-U.S.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Insisting that the departure of Soviet troops is not a retreat or a defeat, the commander of Soviet forces in Afghanistan said Saturday that one-fourth of his troops will be withdrawn from this country before the May 29 summit meeting between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in Moscow. "We think this will make it possible to establish an atmosphere of trust at the summit," Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov declared. He said that by Aug.
NEWS
April 3, 1988
The main Afghan guerrilla alliance warned that it would continue to fight the Kabul government and Soviet troops in Afghanistan if a U.N.-mediated peace agreement is signed in its present form. A statement by alliance leader Gulbuddin Hekmatyar in Pakistan said any accord that fails to set up an interim Afghan government and stop Soviet military aid to Kabul would be unacceptable. Geneva talks on the pact are stalled by a U.S.
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and Afghan leader Najibullah met Monday in Kabul to plan a Soviet troop withdrawal in case peace talks in Geneva do not produce an acceptable plan, Tass said. The official Soviet news agency said that the talks in the Afghan capital centered on the pullout terms announced by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Feb. 8. That plan called for Soviet troops to begin withdrawing on May 15 if an agreement were signed by March 15.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
It's a summit, says Pravda. It's not, says President Reagan. "It's the ultimate New York power lunch," says one U.S. official. Whatever historians call it, Wednesday's first-ever meeting between a Soviet leader and a lame-duck U.S. President and the President-elect almost certainly will cast a long shadow. Despite the rosy glow engendered by the Moscow summit last spring, both Reagan and Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, in his first public comment on a Central American peace initiative that he admitted took him by surprise, promised Thursday that the United States would not abandon Nicaragua's Contras or "leave them twisting out there" in the face of a plan to disarm them and close their bases. Talking to a small group of reporters in the Oval Office, Bush pledged to continue some form of "humanitarian" assistance to the Contras after the current $27-million aid package expires March 31.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union warned Tuesday that it might delay the withdrawal of its troops from Afghanistan beyond Feb. 15, the date by which it had agreed to complete the pullout. Word of this possibility came from Yuli M. Vorontsov, a first deputy Soviet foreign minister and the Kremlin's Afghanistan trouble-shooter, who returned to Moscow after touring the region. He met with officials of Pakistan and Iran and officials of the rebel forces fighting the Afghan government.
NEWS
September 14, 1991
The announcement that the Soviet Union and the United States have agreed to halt all military aid to the warring factions in Afghanistan may signal the winding up of the bloodiest conflict of the 1980s. The History An April, 1978, revolution brought the Communists to power, and by late the next year the Soviet Union had begin a massive airlift of men and armor to save the tottering Kabul regime.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Najibullah, one of the world's last Soviet-backed totalitarian leaders, says he has no intention of stepping down, despite the fall of the hard-liners in the Kremlin and the KGB who put him in power and the imminent prospect of an end to his arms supplies from Moscow.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and the United States agreed Friday to halt all military aid to the warring factions in Afghanistan as of Jan. 1, opening the way for a negotiated end to a 13-year civil war that has killed hundreds of thousands of people.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 12 years of surrogate warfare with the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, the United States intends to press for new cooperation from Moscow to end the bloodshed that has killed hundreds of thousands of people and sapped billions of dollars from both countries for weapons. The determination to resolve one of the world's bloodiest civil wars has been fueled by the dramatic political upheaval in the Soviet Union after the failed coup.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite mounting disillusionment with the Afghan rebels, the Bush Administration has decided to ship them 7,000 tons of captured Iraqi weapons to use in their war against the Soviet-backed Kabul government, according to U.S. sources familiar with the arms transfer. The weapons, largely Soviet-made small arms, rocket launchers, artillery and ammunition, would have a market value if newly purchased of about $30 million, officials said.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's proposal to end CIA aid to the Afghan guerrillas is intended partly to encourage the Soviet Union to reduce its support for the Marxist government in Kabul and could be reversed if the Soviets do not respond, U.S. officials said Sunday. In its secret budget for covert operations submitted to Congress earlier this year, the CIA requested no further funding for the guerrillas, a proposal that would end 11 years of officially covert support.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | Associated Press
The Bush Administration has not requested funds for the Afghan rebels in its proposed 1992 budget, according to a published report. The New York Times in Sunday's editions said the move to end the covert aid reflects the decline of the Cold War and increasing disillusionment with the guerrillas, some of whom support Iraq.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing the gray leisure suit and smile of a suburban politician, Afghanistan's President Najibullah warned Friday of "catastrophic consequences" for his nation if the U.S. Congress continues arming and funding the moujahedeen resistance in a vote scheduled for later this month. Asserting that the current spring "fighting season" has already caused unprecedented death and destruction, the Afghan strongman appealed for a new era in U.S.
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