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United States Military Aid Angola

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NEWS
July 1, 1988
Angolan rebel leader Jonas Savimbi met with President Reagan at the White House and asked for continued U.S. military assistance as long as Cuba and the Soviet Union help the Angolan government. He also urged that the United States work for the withdrawal of foreign troops and that Washington and African nations promote a dialogue on elections between his National Union for the Total Independence of Angola and the Angolan government.
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NEWS
June 1, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a 16-year civil war that took more than 300,000 lives and ravaged their country's economy, the leaders of Angola's two major factions signed a peace agreement Friday that commits them to lay down their arms and compete in multi-party elections.
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NEWS
July 3, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The American Embassy here will celebrate the Fourth of July this year with a big cookout in the ambassador's backyard. In a bit of preventive diplomacy, however, the ambassador says no speeches will be allowed, though toasts will be encouraged. One party planner suggested that the public address system should have a cutoff switch, just in case. He was joking--sort of.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic symbol of joint American and Soviet efforts to settle regional conflicts, Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze each met simultaneously here Wednesday with representatives of an opposing side in the Angolan civil war. The two meetings in Washington provided strong new impetus for a cease-fire that would end Angola's 15-year-old civil war.
NEWS
October 11, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A senior Cuban official Monday denied any agreement with the United States and South Africa on withdrawing Cuban troops from Angola and said such an agreement would require a halt in support for Angolan rebels by Washington and Pretoria. Deputy Foreign Minister Ricardo Alarcon, a member of the Castro government's delegation that took part in four-way talks in New York over the weekend, said Cuba has offered to withdraw its 50,000 troops in 30 months if the sovereignty of Angola is guaranteed.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, The Washington Post
President-elect Bush, in an early foreign policy commitment, has written a letter to Angolan rebel leader Jonas Savimbi assuring him of continued U.S. military and diplomatic backing until the Angolan government reaches a political settlement with him. The letter, dated Jan. 6, also commits the new Bush Administration to press African and other governments to work for agreement between Savimbi's National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) and the Angolan government.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
The State Department denied Thursday that the crash of a CIA plane in Angola indicated the United States is acting like the Nicaraguan government it has accused of helping leftist rebels in El Salvador. Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler refused to confirm publicly, as other officials have said privately, that the plane was on a covert CIA mission to resupply Angolan rebels.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday rejected a Democratic-led effort to bring covert military aid to Angola into the open, amid complaints that the funds would be halted altogether if whites, rather than blacks, were being wounded and killed in the African civil war. House members voted 246 to 175 to defeat a proposal by California Rep. Ronald V. Dellums (D-Berkeley) that would have lifted the veil of secrecy surrounding the Angola aid program.
NEWS
March 31, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
As a direct result of the Iran- contra scandal, Congress is moving to put strict new controls on the clandestine military assistance that President Reagan has been giving to anti-Communist insurgencies around the globe. Under the policy known as the Reagan Doctrine, the Administration funnels millions of dollars through the CIA each year to rebel groups in Afghanistan, Angola and Cambodia as well as to the anti-Sandinista forces in Nicaragua.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting the thaw in the Cold War, Congress is on the verge of hobbling all three ongoing covert U.S. military operations, including cutting about $50 million from the Bush Administration's $300-million request for rebels in Afghanistan, sources said Tuesday. The actions, believed to be the first substantial curtailment of the secret U.S. proxy wars in more than a decade, signal growing congressional impatience with the operations.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday rejected a Democratic-led effort to bring covert military aid to Angola into the open, amid complaints that the funds would be halted altogether if whites, rather than blacks, were being wounded and killed in the African civil war. House members voted 246 to 175 to defeat a proposal by California Rep. Ronald V. Dellums (D-Berkeley) that would have lifted the veil of secrecy surrounding the Angola aid program.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Intelligence Committee will press the Bush Administration this week to lift the official veil of secrecy on America's three largest covert programs--aid to anti-Communist rebels in Afghanistan, Angola and Cambodia. In what would be a sweeping change in U.S. intelligence policy, the powerful committee will call on the government to abandon the long-cherished practice of running such huge military aid programs as secret operations.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
The State Department denied Thursday that the crash of a CIA plane in Angola indicated the United States is acting like the Nicaraguan government it has accused of helping leftist rebels in El Salvador. Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler refused to confirm publicly, as other officials have said privately, that the plane was on a covert CIA mission to resupply Angolan rebels.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
A CIA plane en route from Zaire to Angola carrying military and other equipment for U.S.-backed rebels crashed this week, killing at least five Americans and an undetermined number of guerrillas, government officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, The Washington Post
President-elect Bush, in an early foreign policy commitment, has written a letter to Angolan rebel leader Jonas Savimbi assuring him of continued U.S. military and diplomatic backing until the Angolan government reaches a political settlement with him. The letter, dated Jan. 6, also commits the new Bush Administration to press African and other governments to work for agreement between Savimbi's National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) and the Angolan government.
NEWS
October 11, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A senior Cuban official Monday denied any agreement with the United States and South Africa on withdrawing Cuban troops from Angola and said such an agreement would require a halt in support for Angolan rebels by Washington and Pretoria. Deputy Foreign Minister Ricardo Alarcon, a member of the Castro government's delegation that took part in four-way talks in New York over the weekend, said Cuba has offered to withdraw its 50,000 troops in 30 months if the sovereignty of Angola is guaranteed.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The withdrawal of Cuban troops from Angola as part of a peace settlement in southern Africa--if it follows the agreement in principle announced Wednesday--should further improve prospects for better relations between the world's two superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union. Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev clearly played a facilitating role in the new Angola agreement, according to Administration and other experts.
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