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United States Military Aid Bolivia

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NEWS
April 26, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the war on drugs, no one in this capital wants to be on the wrong side. But a stubborn squabble between Congress and the Bush Administration this week halted deliveries of weapons both sides agree are crucial to the fight. At issue is a fleet of helicopters slated for the front line in a new U.S.-backed assault against drug traffickers in South America. In the mountainous terrain where coca-growers thrive, the whirlybirds often can be the only way to get around.
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NEWS
May 26, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Bolivian heartland of South America, Special Forces from Ft. Bragg, N.C., have established the biggest U.S. military presence on this continent. The American soldiers are strictly limited to their role as trainers, but they play a key part in a controversy over the so-called "militarization" of Bolivia's campaign against cocaine trafficking. The controversy crackles and flares with suspicions of official corruption, fears of bloody conflict and allegations of Yankee imperialism.
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NEWS
August 11, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Law enforcement officials are still losing the war to stop the cocaine traffic between Bolivia and the United States, but U.S. officials say that Bolivia's special battalion of cocaine police--although widely regarded as inept and corrupt--is beginning to mend its ways. The special battalion, known as the Leopards, has been reorganized. Since May, it has been getting jungle training from a team of U.S.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the war on drugs, no one in this capital wants to be on the wrong side. But a stubborn squabble between Congress and the Bush Administration this week halted deliveries of weapons both sides agree are crucial to the fight. At issue is a fleet of helicopters slated for the front line in a new U.S.-backed assault against drug traffickers in South America. In the mountainous terrain where coca-growers thrive, the whirlybirds often can be the only way to get around.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A joint Peruvian-American anti-drug force has launched a major offensive against cocaine traffickers in Peru, staging helicopter-borne raids that destroyed three jungle laboratories in a single day, Peruvian and American officials confirmed Sunday.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration is prepared to dispatch U.S. military advisers and trainers to Peru and Bolivia to join their war against drugs, William J. Bennett, national drug control policy director, said Sunday. "You see now in Colombia the presence of American trainers working with Colombians giving advice, training them on equipment. This is the kind of thing we'd anticipate if Peru and Bolivia take the same steps," Bennett said on ABC's "This Week with David Brinkley."
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Bolivian heartland of South America, Special Forces from Ft. Bragg, N.C., have established the biggest U.S. military presence on this continent. The American soldiers are strictly limited to their role as trainers, but they play a key part in a controversy over the so-called "militarization" of Bolivia's campaign against cocaine trafficking. The controversy crackles and flares with suspicions of official corruption, fears of bloody conflict and allegations of Yankee imperialism.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration, as part of its new offensive against drug producers, has decided to back away from efforts to eradicate coca fields in Peru and Bolivia and to escalate military campaigns to intercept the crops before they reach processing labs, Administration officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In a marked shift in the nation's anti-drug strategy, a plan nearing approval by the Bush Administration would direct hundreds of millions of dollars to cocaine-producing nations and crack-blighted inner cities while providing no new assistance for border interception programs, officials said Wednesday. The sweeping plan--drafted by William J.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A joint Peruvian-American anti-drug force has launched a major offensive against cocaine traffickers in Peru, staging helicopter-borne raids that destroyed three jungle laboratories in a single day, Peruvian and American officials confirmed Sunday.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration is prepared to dispatch U.S. military advisers and trainers to Peru and Bolivia to join their war against drugs, William J. Bennett, national drug control policy director, said Sunday. "You see now in Colombia the presence of American trainers working with Colombians giving advice, training them on equipment. This is the kind of thing we'd anticipate if Peru and Bolivia take the same steps," Bennett said on ABC's "This Week with David Brinkley."
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration, as part of its new offensive against drug producers, has decided to back away from efforts to eradicate coca fields in Peru and Bolivia and to escalate military campaigns to intercept the crops before they reach processing labs, Administration officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In a marked shift in the nation's anti-drug strategy, a plan nearing approval by the Bush Administration would direct hundreds of millions of dollars to cocaine-producing nations and crack-blighted inner cities while providing no new assistance for border interception programs, officials said Wednesday. The sweeping plan--drafted by William J.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Law enforcement officials are still losing the war to stop the cocaine traffic between Bolivia and the United States, but U.S. officials say that Bolivia's special battalion of cocaine police--although widely regarded as inept and corrupt--is beginning to mend its ways. The special battalion, known as the Leopards, has been reorganized. Since May, it has been getting jungle training from a team of U.S.
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