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United States Military Aid Cambodia

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March 15, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the Cambodian resistance leader, said here Tuesday that he is seeking military aid from the United States to strengthen his position for battle in Cambodia and peace talks in France. "Up to now we got from the United States of America non-lethal aid, but we want a few lethal aids," Sihanouk said in English at a press conference at the state guest house in Beijing where he resides.
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NEWS
December 17, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capt. Jeb Stewart, a U.S. Army officer from Walnut Creek, Calif., smiled at the soldiers arrayed before him and noted sardonically, "You get a lot of diversity in the Cambodian army." One of the recruits was barely 16 years old; two others were in their late 60s. They were among 45 Cambodians being trained by a contingent from the U.S. Special Forces in the arcane art of detecting land mines and disposing of them safely. Stewart and his 13-member contingent, among the first U.S.
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NEWS
July 13, 1989
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee shelved a bid to give U.S. weapons to non-Communist Cambodian guerrillas. Several Democrats voiced fears that any arms might find their way to the Khmer Rouge, the Cambodian Communist faction blamed for the deaths of 1 million people when it held power in the 1970s.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration admitted Tuesday that there may have been "tactical military cooperation" in Cambodia between the U.S.-backed non-Communist resistance groups and the murderous Khmer Rouge, which killed more than a million Cambodians in the late 1970s.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dan Quayle, winding up a two-week tour of Asia that concentrated on U.S. security issues, plans to meet today with officials of four Southeast Asian nations in a bid to revive U.S. policy toward Cambodia. Quayle will meet with representatives of Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia shortly after arriving in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia's capital, a senior U.S. official traveling with the vice president said.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Cambodian resistance leader Prince Norodom Sihanouk warned his American critics Tuesday that any cutoff of U.S. aid to his guerrilla faction will only force him closer to China. Sihanouk, the head of a three-faction resistance coalition seeking to oust the Vietnamese-installed Phnom Penh government, has come under growing criticism in recent months for his relations with the radical Khmer Rouge.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration admitted Tuesday that there may have been "tactical military cooperation" in Cambodia between the U.S.-backed non-Communist resistance groups and the murderous Khmer Rouge, which killed more than a million Cambodians in the late 1970s.
NEWS
December 17, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capt. Jeb Stewart, a U.S. Army officer from Walnut Creek, Calif., smiled at the soldiers arrayed before him and noted sardonically, "You get a lot of diversity in the Cambodian army." One of the recruits was barely 16 years old; two others were in their late 60s. They were among 45 Cambodians being trained by a contingent from the U.S. Special Forces in the arcane art of detecting land mines and disposing of them safely. Stewart and his 13-member contingent, among the first U.S.
NEWS
March 31, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
As a direct result of the Iran- contra scandal, Congress is moving to put strict new controls on the clandestine military assistance that President Reagan has been giving to anti-Communist insurgencies around the globe. Under the policy known as the Reagan Doctrine, the Administration funnels millions of dollars through the CIA each year to rebel groups in Afghanistan, Angola and Cambodia as well as to the anti-Sandinista forces in Nicaragua.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting the thaw in the Cold War, Congress is on the verge of hobbling all three ongoing covert U.S. military operations, including cutting about $50 million from the Bush Administration's $300-million request for rebels in Afghanistan, sources said Tuesday. The actions, believed to be the first substantial curtailment of the secret U.S. proxy wars in more than a decade, signal growing congressional impatience with the operations.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting the thaw in the Cold War, Congress is on the verge of hobbling all three ongoing covert U.S. military operations, including cutting about $50 million from the Bush Administration's $300-million request for rebels in Afghanistan, sources said Tuesday. The actions, believed to be the first substantial curtailment of the secret U.S. proxy wars in more than a decade, signal growing congressional impatience with the operations.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Intelligence Committee will press the Bush Administration this week to lift the official veil of secrecy on America's three largest covert programs--aid to anti-Communist rebels in Afghanistan, Angola and Cambodia. In what would be a sweeping change in U.S. intelligence policy, the powerful committee will call on the government to abandon the long-cherished practice of running such huge military aid programs as secret operations.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Cambodian resistance leader Prince Norodom Sihanouk warned his American critics Tuesday that any cutoff of U.S. aid to his guerrilla faction will only force him closer to China. Sihanouk, the head of a three-faction resistance coalition seeking to oust the Vietnamese-installed Phnom Penh government, has come under growing criticism in recent months for his relations with the radical Khmer Rouge.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dan Quayle, winding up a two-week tour of Asia that concentrated on U.S. security issues, plans to meet today with officials of four Southeast Asian nations in a bid to revive U.S. policy toward Cambodia. Quayle will meet with representatives of Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia shortly after arriving in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia's capital, a senior U.S. official traveling with the vice president said.
NEWS
July 21, 1989
The Senate, by a vote of 59 to 39, adopted an amendment by Sen. Charles Robb (D-Va.) that opens the way for President Bush to make unspecified military aid available to the non-communist resistance forces in Cambodia allied with Prince Norodom Sihanouk. The amendment is similar to one already passed by the House. Robb said it does not directly authorize military aid but does give the President the "flexibility" to ask authorization for it at a later time.
NEWS
March 15, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the Cambodian resistance leader, said here Tuesday that he is seeking military aid from the United States to strengthen his position for battle in Cambodia and peace talks in France. "Up to now we got from the United States of America non-lethal aid, but we want a few lethal aids," Sihanouk said in English at a press conference at the state guest house in Beijing where he resides.
NEWS
November 4, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
A U.S. newspaper report alleging that Thai military officers have taken money from a covert aid fund for Cambodian guerrillas has triggered sharp denials by authorities here--and exposed the operation to the public. Army Commander Chavalit Yongchaiyudh demanded Wednesday that the Washington Post, which published the accusation Sunday, identify the alleged culprits. "Whoever gave the news should give details," he insisted. "If they don't, it's not right."
NEWS
November 4, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
A U.S. newspaper report alleging that Thai military officers have taken money from a covert aid fund for Cambodian guerrillas has triggered sharp denials by authorities here--and exposed the operation to the public. Army Commander Chavalit Yongchaiyudh demanded Wednesday that the Washington Post, which published the accusation Sunday, identify the alleged culprits. "Whoever gave the news should give details," he insisted. "If they don't, it's not right."
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