Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Military Aid Colombia
IN THE NEWS

United States Military Aid Colombia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh on Sunday praised Colombia's new willingness to extradite drug criminals to the United States and said that the Bush Administration has not ruled out sending U.S. troops to that country to assist in its war on narcotics traffickers, if such help is requested. "I think we have to look at any request that we get for either law enforcement or military assistance seriously," he said, adding that recent acts of terrorism in Colombia, including Friday's assassination of Sen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 6, 2001 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A brilliant blue butterfly the size of a wren drifted through the jungle clearing. The Colombian general dropped his voice to a whisper. "At this moment, we can't see them or hear them. But they are only 50 meters [55 yards] away from us now," he said. Suddenly, with a shout, the area turned into a war zone. The men in the clearing, seemingly busy at work in a cocaine lab, dropped to their knees and began firing. A percussion grenade exploded with a skin-shaking thump.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
President Bush on Saturday angrily condemned the assassination of the leading Colombian presidential candidate and said "the narco-traffickers who again have robbed Colombia of a courageous leader must be defeated." The President, saluting the decision by Colombian President Virgilio Barco Vargas to reinstate a suspended extradition treaty with the United States, pledged that "the U.S. is ready to coordinate the extradition of these criminals as expeditiously as possible."
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From this island of bars and brothels gripped by dark green jungle, you can see the nightmare rising in Colombia. Here, in a remote corner of the rain forest, the army has broken up what was once a cocaine paradise. There were no cops, no military, no government. The drug labs ran day and night. Coke was currency, with a gram buying a cold beer flown in from faraway Bogota. It was a world where everything was controlled by one organization--the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG and DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writers
Red tape in the United States may delay U.S. extradition proceedings against a millionaire drug money launderer arrested in Colombia, allowing him to go free without charges, American officials said here Tuesday. Meanwhile, Colombian police said late Tuesday that they had arrested five suspects in the Friday assassination of presidential candidate Sen. Luis Carlos Galan, whose death had been blamed on cocaine traffickers. Galan had been an outspoken opponent of the drug-trafficking cartels.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soldiers and police raided the estates of cocaine barons Monday, seizing aircraft, cars and cattle and bringing the number of people arrested in three days to more than 11,000, authorities reported. One of those arrested Monday was identified as a finance chief of the Medellin drug cartel. The cartel bosses have so far eluded the emergency-rule crackdown, but new raids were being reported hourly across the nation.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writers
Colombian Justice Minister Monica de Greiff, shielded by extraordinarily tight security because her country's cocaine barons have threatened to kill her, conferred with Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and other American officials Monday about U.S.-Colombian cooperation to bring narcotics traffickers to trial in the United States.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the war on drugs, no one in this capital wants to be on the wrong side. But a stubborn squabble between Congress and the Bush Administration this week halted deliveries of weapons both sides agree are crucial to the fight. At issue is a fleet of helicopters slated for the front line in a new U.S.-backed assault against drug traffickers in South America. In the mountainous terrain where coca-growers thrive, the whirlybirds often can be the only way to get around.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
Responding to an urgent appeal from Colombia's embattled justice minister, Bush Administration officials agreed Tuesday to consider increasing U.S. aid for that South American country's escalating war on the drug cartels, only days after a $65-million package of military assistance was offered.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Virgilio Barco of Colombia told President Bush by telephone Monday night that U.S. troops are not needed to help him fight drug trafficking in his violence-wracked country, the White House said. Barco indicated that he had read "press speculation about the use of U.S. troops in Colombia," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said in a written statement. He was referring to suggestions by Atty. Gen.
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | DAVID AQUILA LAWRENCE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just when the United States had decided to resume military aid to Colombia after a two-decade hiatus, the armed forces here have been implicated in brutal killings linked to illegal private armies. Some of the killings appear to have involved narcotics police, who previously had been thought untainted by the rest of the armed forces' dismal human rights record. While the slayings are being investigated, $10 million--the first installment of a new U.S. aid program--is being held up by Congress.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A report issued Monday by a private human rights group criticizes the Bush Administration for pumping military aid into Colombia to fight drug traffickers while ignoring human rights violations. The report, by Americas Watch in New York City, also accuses the Colombian government of failing in many cases to prosecute security force members linked to drug traffickers and right-wing death squads.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The weekend election of another staunchly anti-drug president in Colombia was hailed by U.S. officials Monday as providing a crucial opening for a long-postponed, American-backed military crackdown on narcotics traffickers in the region.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Unhappy and unstable marriages between drug traffickers and terrorists are washing South American cocaine trails with blood. In Peru, fanatical Maoist guerrillas have built alliances with peasant growers of coca, the source of cocaine, and with the trafficker organizations. In neighboring Colombia, at different times and in different places, both leftist guerrillas and right-wing death squads have established opportunistic and lethal links with drug lords.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the war on drugs, no one in this capital wants to be on the wrong side. But a stubborn squabble between Congress and the Bush Administration this week halted deliveries of weapons both sides agree are crucial to the fight. At issue is a fleet of helicopters slated for the front line in a new U.S.-backed assault against drug traffickers in South America. In the mountainous terrain where coca-growers thrive, the whirlybirds often can be the only way to get around.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. anti-drug officials fear that two devastating bombings in Colombia represent the onset of a major escalation by cocaine traffickers and could seriously complicate the Administration's efforts to help the Colombian government win its drug war.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
President Bush and his senior advisers consider the situation in Colombia "the best hope we've had" for stemming the tide of cocaine flowing to the United States from Central America. "What we have here is a crisis precipitated by the most brazen kind of terrorist activity and not to really seize the opportunity to do something about it would be crazy," one senior official said.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Friday unveiled a $65-million program of emergency aid to fortify Colombia's war against drug kingpins, offering helicopters, assault boats, machine guns and mortars for that nation's "courageous challenge to these insidious forces." Administration officials said the equipment, along with a small contingent of U.S.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | From Reuters
Britain is preparing an anti-drug package for Colombia that will coincide with U.S. efforts to assist the Latin American country's crackdown on drug traffickers, British Foreign Secretary John Major told President Bush on Monday. "It's mainly training and technical assistance. It will certainly also deal with protection of personnel," Major told reporters as he emerged from White House meetings with Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
U.S. anti-drug agencies suffer from "large gaps" in their knowledge of how the Colombian cocaine cartels operate, and even when important information is obtained, it is not used effectively, a Senate report obtained Monday concludes. The report of the Republican staff of the Senate Governmental Affairs permanent investigations subcommittee, which began its inquiry a year ago, charged that U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|