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United States Military Aid El Salvador

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Should the public airwaves encourage ideas or ignorance? If you opt for ignorance, you're probably applauding the decision by commercial TV stations in Los Angeles--and elsewhere across the nation--to veto a paid commercial taking a strong stand on United States military aid to El Salvador. If you favor ideas, you're probably repulsed by the decision. And rightfully so. Their refusal is a commercial for cowardice. Whether the commercial favors or opposes U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1991 | Associated Press
The head of the U.S. Catholic bishops' International Policy Committee has urged Congress to tighten restrictions on U.S. military aid to El Salvador. Archbishop John R. Roach of Minneapolis-St. Paul, said further reductions in such aid would help the peace process mediated there by the United Nations.
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NEWS
January 6, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. military autopsies show conclusively that two American soldiers were "murdered in cold blood . . . executed" by Salvadoran guerrillas after they had survived a crash-landing of their helicopter, U.S. Ambassador William G. Walker said Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | Associated Press
U.S. Roman Catholic bishops have urged Congress to continue to tie any U.S. military aid to El Salvador to "satisfactory progress" toward a negotiated settlement with insurgents. Archbishop John R. Roach of St. Paul-Minneapolis, head of an international policy committee, said in a letter to the Senate: "El Salvador does not need more and more arms, but support for a negotiated and just peace."
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tense and tired, with weapons in hand, 12 U.S. Army Green Berets raced from a luxury hotel tower Wednesday, 28 hours after leftist guerrillas trapped them inside. They said the rebels who had occupied the Sheraton Hotel escaped Tuesday evening while church and relief workers evacuated 17 civilians from other floors of the hotel's VIP tower. "They slipped out the back," one soldier said. "They slipped down the stairwell, went out back and jumped over the wall."
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. officials Wednesday reaffirmed their commitment to keep military advisers in El Salvador despite a rebel threat that two Americans killed in recent weeks "won't be the last." Salvadoran officials, meanwhile, conceded that 69 soldiers died in Tuesday's attack on the key 4th Infantry Brigade headquarters at El Paraiso in the northern province of Chalatenango and that 60 others were wounded. The army earlier had said 43 soldiers died and 35 were wounded. Also killed was Staff Sgt. Gregory A.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Alfredo Cristiani of El Salvador held intensive talks with key lawmakers Thursday in an effort to persuade Congress not to suspend military aid to his embattled government because of the recent slayings of six Jesuit priests and other human rights abuses.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In an unusual display of interfaith unanimity, Catholic Archbishop Roger M. Mahony and local Protestant and Jewish leaders protested U.S. military aid to violence-torn El Salvador in an outdoor service Wednesday at the Los Angeles Civic Center. "Let our government refrain from investment in war," Mahony said in an opening prayer before about 800 protesters and lunch-time observers. Mahony, scheduled to leave Saturday on an eight-day trip to Central America, said in an interview that the U.S.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration praised El Salvador on Monday for admitting military involvement in the recent slayings of six Jesuit priests, but members of Congress suggested that continued U.S. military support for the tiny Central American nation might be in jeopardy unless the killers are punished.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Visiting Salvadoran President Alfredo Cristiani, in a last-ditch bid for congressional support for U.S. military assistance, told key lawmakers that he would agree to a cut in military aid as long as it was linked to a cease-fire agreement with anti-government rebels. The House has passed a bill that would withhold half of the $85 million in military aid that the Bush Administration has proposed for 1991 even in the absence of a cease-fire.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what Western diplomats say is an attempt to "buy off" dissatisfied Salvadoran army officers, the United States is planning a multimillion-dollar educational and job training program for soldiers who will be dismissed when the country's civil war ends. The officials say the money for it will come from whatever is left from this year's U.S. military aid program of $85 million and will make up a large part of the $92 million that the Bush Administration is seeking for 1992.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
El Salvador's brutal civil war is far from over, despite an agreement between the right-wing government and a radical leftist guerrilla force that kept the process open for a negotiated settlement but failed to address major disputes.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | JIM MANN and THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Taiwanese-American dissident writer Henry Liu was gunned down in 1984 in the garage of his Bay Area home, American investigators painstakingly traced the murder from the killers up to Wang Hsi-Ling, then head of Taiwan's military intelligence. Finally, amid considerable American prodding and intense press coverage, authorities in Taiwan convicted Wang and two associates of the American murder and sentenced them to life imprisonment. The sentence was later reduced to 15 years. But this Jan.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
El Salvador's army sent out new U.S.-supplied aircraft on their first combat run, bombarding a rebel stronghold to the north of the nation's capital of San Salvador, the army and radio reports said. "We have information that the army has begun a major bombardment in the general area of Guazapa Mountain," a military spokesman said. Guazapa Mountain, 12 miles north of downtown San Salvador, has been one of the main rebel strongholds throughout the 11-year civil war. On Tuesday, the U.S.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three American A-37 jet fighter-bombers and six attack helicopters were delivered to the Salvadoran air force headquarters at Ilopango, to help offset heavy losses sustained in recent guerrilla attacks. The jets were inscribed with the names of three U.S. servicemen who died after rebels shot down their helicopter in eastern El Salvador. Warrant Officer Daniel Scott, the pilot, died in the Jan. 2 attack. Leftist rebels have admitted killing Lt. Col. David Pickett and Pvt. Ernest Dawson.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush told Congress on Tuesday that he has decided to free $42.5 million in military aid for the government of El Salvador, saying Salvadoran rebels are committing human rights abuses and grabbing weapons. But Bush said he would hold up dispensing the money for 60 days to coincide with elections in March for the Salvadoran National Assembly. This will give peace negotiations under the auspices of the United Nations "every chance to work," Bush said.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A congressional task force, releasing a report that may help seal the fate of continued U.S. military aid to El Salvador, said Monday that Salvadoran investigators have made no serious effort to determine whether senior military officers were involved in the murders of six Jesuit priests and two others in San Salvador last year. "The investigation is stalled," said Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass), chairman of the House Democratic task force appointed by House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | Associated Press
U.S. Roman Catholic bishops have urged Congress to continue to tie any U.S. military aid to El Salvador to "satisfactory progress" toward a negotiated settlement with insurgents. Archbishop John R. Roach of St. Paul-Minneapolis, head of an international policy committee, said in a letter to the Senate: "El Salvador does not need more and more arms, but support for a negotiated and just peace."
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Sunday denounced as "absolutely outrageous" the apparent murder of two U.S. servicemen by Salvadoran rebels and said that the Administration will seek to lift congressional restrictions on military aid to El Salvador.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. military autopsies show conclusively that two American soldiers were "murdered in cold blood . . . executed" by Salvadoran guerrillas after they had survived a crash-landing of their helicopter, U.S. Ambassador William G. Walker said Saturday.
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