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NEWS
October 3, 1987 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The Senate, anticipating a U.S.-Soviet agreement to eliminate all intermediate-range nuclear missiles, on Friday approved a first step toward modernizing part of this country's arsenal of shorter-range nuclear weapons on the European continent. Accepting arguments that improving such weapons could help compensate for those to be destroyed under the treaty, the Senate agreed to let the Army begin studying the need for a nuclear warhead for its Tactical Missile System--known by the acronym ATACMS.
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NEWS
August 31, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's plea to U.S. allies to share in the financial burden of the Middle East crisis reflects a major change since the Vietnam War in America's view of its military role in the world. Throughout most of the 20th Century, the United States has seen itself as the "arsenal of democracy" and a principal financier in times of war. But over the past decade, Americans have become increasingly less willing to assume the burden for defending the Western world. Some analysts, such as Sen.
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NEWS
May 9, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney warned Tuesday that in spite of political changes that have caused the "demise" of the Warsaw Pact as a military threat, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization should not renounce the first use of nuclear weapons in a European ground war. Speaking to reporters on the way to a meeting of NATO's Nuclear Planning Group here, Cheney said, "I would not give . . . up" the threat to initiate a nuclear war in Europe.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Efforts here to forge a historic agreement transforming NATO are part of a major attempt to carve out a new role for the 41-year-old alliance in a Europe emerging from the Cold War but still haunted by its long history of conflict. The need to preserve a predominantly military alliance at all may have been called into question at a time when peace and reconciliation dominate events on the once-divided Continent.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Efforts here to forge a historic agreement transforming NATO are part of a major attempt to carve out a new role for the 41-year-old alliance in a Europe emerging from the Cold War but still haunted by its long history of conflict. The need to preserve a predominantly military alliance at all may have been called into question at a time when peace and reconciliation dominate events on the once-divided Continent.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of the United States' most important Western allies differed publicly over key aspects of Europe's political future here Friday but agreed that America's nuclear umbrella remains essential to the Continent's ultimate security. West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, whose relations are notoriously tepid, appeared to go out of their way to be jovial at a joint press conference concluding two days of official talks here.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO defense ministers, responding to dramatic changes in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, said Thursday that while most nuclear weapons can safely be withdrawn from Europe, the Atlantic Alliance must continue to deploy some of those weapons if it is to prevent the outbreak of war there. "For the foreseeable future, the deterrence of war will continue to require . . .
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
American forces in Europe may have to be reduced if the next U.S. defense budget slips below a proposed 2% increase, Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci warned Friday. Carlucci told a meeting of defense ministers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization that the budget hike is essential to maintain the stateside structure needed to support overseas deployment of U.S. troops. "You need this kind of real growth to meet strategic goals," he said.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Lord Carrington, secretary general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, says he expects the summit meeting here this week to reaffirm the alliance's strategy of defense based on both conventional and nuclear weapons. Carrington said he recognizes that some of the 16 member governments approach the problem from different points of view, but he discounted reports that NATO is seriously divided as a result of the U.S.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Manfred Woerner, secretary general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, called Tuesday for "active cooperation" with Warsaw Pact nations, the West's traditional enemy. Woerner, the former West German defense minister, called on the governments of NATO's 16 member-nations to direct their attention to new political tasks that lie ahead.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | From the Washington Post
On the eve of a summit meeting of Western leaders next week, the Bush Administration has proposed to its allies the eventual withdrawal of the U.S. arsenal of nuclear-tipped artillery shells from Western Europe, senior U.S. and diplomatic officials disclosed Saturday. The unilateral withdrawal of a stockpile of nearly 1,400 U.S. nuclear weapons from West Germany and four other countries would occur as virtually all the enemy targets for such weapons disappear from Eastern Europe.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move reflecting the profound political and military changes in Europe, the United States announced Thursday that it is dropping its longstanding demand that its North Atlantic Treaty Organization allies increase their defense spending by 3% a year after accounting for inflation.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO defense ministers, responding to dramatic changes in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, said Thursday that while most nuclear weapons can safely be withdrawn from Europe, the Atlantic Alliance must continue to deploy some of those weapons if it is to prevent the outbreak of war there. "For the foreseeable future, the deterrence of war will continue to require . . .
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney warned Tuesday that in spite of political changes that have caused the "demise" of the Warsaw Pact as a military threat, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization should not renounce the first use of nuclear weapons in a European ground war. Speaking to reporters on the way to a meeting of NATO's Nuclear Planning Group here, Cheney said, "I would not give . . . up" the threat to initiate a nuclear war in Europe.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush traveled deep into the heartland Friday to urge Americans to reject isolationism and maintain a military role abroad as the Cold War Soviet threat recedes. "A few of you may be wondering what a continent 4,000 miles away has to do with you," Bush told a commencement audience at Oklahoma State University's football stadium. "Many of the graduates of America's class of 1916" wondered the same thing, he said.
NEWS
April 20, 1990 | Associated Press
With East-West tensions in decline, the Bush Administration is postponing indefinitely the development of new short-range nuclear missiles that were to be based in West Germany, U.S. officials said Thursday. The 88 new launchers, 36 of which were to be controlled by the United States and the others by West Germany, Britain and the Netherlands, were to be targeted on East Germany. They would have been capable of launching about 1,600 missiles. The tentative U.S.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense ministers of the Western Alliance on Wednesday reaffirmed the need for a strong defense. They acted at the close of a two-day meeting that concerned itself mainly with the rapid changes taking place in Eastern Europe and reports of a projected reduction in U.S. troops in Western Europe.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American defense planners are preparing massive new troop cuts in Europe, reducing the U.S. presence here by as much as two-thirds over the next several years, a senior U.S. official said Tuesday. The current 310,000 U.S. troops in Europe will be cut to 100,000 to 150,000 in response to a sharply reduced Soviet military threat and in recognition of severe budgetary pressures at home, said the official, who asked that his name not be used.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of the United States' most important Western allies differed publicly over key aspects of Europe's political future here Friday but agreed that America's nuclear umbrella remains essential to the Continent's ultimate security. West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, whose relations are notoriously tepid, appeared to go out of their way to be jovial at a joint press conference concluding two days of official talks here.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense ministers of the Western Alliance on Wednesday reaffirmed the need for a strong defense. They acted at the close of a two-day meeting that concerned itself mainly with the rapid changes taking place in Eastern Europe and reports of a projected reduction in U.S. troops in Western Europe.
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