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United States Military Aid Germany

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BUSINESS
January 22, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration has decided not to seek a tax increase to help finance the war in the Persian Gulf, even though the military action is already costing between $600 million and $1 billion per day, Administration and congressional sources said Monday. The decision means that the United States will instead be forced to boost government borrowing--and expand the already massive budget deficit--in order to pay for the high-tech war in the gulf.
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NEWS
March 4, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the Germans, last October's unification seemed as much the start of a new era as the end of the country's long division. This was to be a time of hope in which a rich, enlightened Germany would recoup its full sovereignty, finally lay to rest a guilt-laden past and lead Europe toward its own peaceful reconciliation. Then came the Gulf War.
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NEWS
March 4, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the Germans, last October's unification seemed as much the start of a new era as the end of the country's long division. This was to be a time of hope in which a rich, enlightened Germany would recoup its full sovereignty, finally lay to rest a guilt-laden past and lead Europe toward its own peaceful reconciliation. Then came the Gulf War.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration has decided not to seek a tax increase to help finance the war in the Persian Gulf, even though the military action is already costing between $600 million and $1 billion per day, Administration and congressional sources said Monday. The decision means that the United States will instead be forced to boost government borrowing--and expand the already massive budget deficit--in order to pay for the high-tech war in the gulf.
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