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United States Military Aid Honduras

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NEWS
March 23, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Both the Sandinista army and the Contras gained strategic benefits from bloody battles at the Honduran border last week. As a result, each side is negotiating from an improved position in this week's peace talks, and neither side appears to be under increased military pressure to make concessions that might ease the way toward agreement. Sandinista troops struck a significant blow by driving hundreds of guerrillas out of jungle strongholds and across the Honduran border.
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NEWS
February 23, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Ronald Reagan says in videotaped testimony released Thursday that he pressured Honduras in 1985 to help Nicaragua's Contra rebels in return for U.S. military and economic aid, providing the first high-level confirmation of what some White House documents called a "quid pro quo" arrangement. "In return for our help in the form of security assurances as well as aid . . .
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NEWS
March 18, 1988 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Democratic presidential contenders debated long-distance with Republican Bob Dole on Thursday over the dispatch of U.S. troops to Central America, with Richard A. Gephardt charging that the Administration had "abandoned the rule of law." Dole called for U.S. military help for the Nicaraguan rebels, who he said were being "slaughtered by the hundreds." (A Contra spokesman said Thursday that casualties in recent days totaled 10 dead or missing and 67 wounded.) The Rev.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, as part of a bid to ensure Honduran military assistance to the Nicaraguan rebels, told the president of Honduras in 1985 that the United States was accelerating economic aid payments to his country, according to a government document released Thursday.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
Spurred by the Nicaraguan offensive on the Honduran border, a bipartisan group of Senate moderates Friday launched an effort to break the congressional stalemate on Contra aid, introducing a $48-million assistance package that would include delivery of some already purchased military supplies for the rebels.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Reagan devoted most of his regular weekly radio address Saturday to the issue of Nicaragua, castigating Congress for halting aid to the Contras and declaring that the incursion by Sandinista troops into Honduras proved that the Managua regime is a regional threat.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The Sandinista attack along the Honduran border was a calculated risk aimed at crippling the Contras militarily and forcing them to negotiate an end to their 6-year-old insurgency.
NEWS
February 1, 1989
The United States has delivered the last of 12 supersonic jet fighters to Honduras--a move that Nicaragua views as threatening the military balance in Central America, military sources said. Honduras says the F-5 jets, costing a total of $75 million, will maintain its traditional air supremacy in the region and replace a fleet of aging, French-built Mirage fighters.
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration plans to provide a squadron of F-5E jet fighters to Honduras, a move that would give Nicaragua's neighbor the first advanced combat jets in Central America, officials said Thursday. Elliott Abrams, assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs, told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that he expects formal notification to be made to Congress soon. The F-5Es are far more advanced than any other combat aircraft now in use in Central America.
NEWS
January 17, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
At the rate of at least one a month, ships from all over the world land at this steamy port on the Caribbean coast to unload cargoes of arms. Much of the weaponry is bound for the Honduran military, which has been slowly building up to match the growth of the armies in neighboring Nicaragua and El Salvador. But some of it is destined for the contras-- the rebels operating in this country whose avowed intent is to topple the Marxist government in Nicaragua.
NEWS
February 1, 1989
The United States has delivered the last of 12 supersonic jet fighters to Honduras--a move that Nicaragua views as threatening the military balance in Central America, military sources said. Honduras says the F-5 jets, costing a total of $75 million, will maintain its traditional air supremacy in the region and replace a fleet of aging, French-built Mirage fighters.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Both the Sandinista army and the Contras gained strategic benefits from bloody battles at the Honduran border last week. As a result, each side is negotiating from an improved position in this week's peace talks, and neither side appears to be under increased military pressure to make concessions that might ease the way toward agreement. Sandinista troops struck a significant blow by driving hundreds of guerrillas out of jungle strongholds and across the Honduran border.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Reagan devoted most of his regular weekly radio address Saturday to the issue of Nicaragua, castigating Congress for halting aid to the Contras and declaring that the incursion by Sandinista troops into Honduras proved that the Managua regime is a regional threat.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The Sandinista attack along the Honduran border was a calculated risk aimed at crippling the Contras militarily and forcing them to negotiate an end to their 6-year-old insurgency.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
This country's air force jets bombed a remote jungle region of the Honduran-Nicaraguan frontier Saturday for the second time in three days to make good on threats to force an incursion of Nicaraguan troops from Honduran territory, informed sources reported. Details of the bombing raid were sketchy, and Honduran military authorities made no public comment. Sources said the bombing took place on both sides of the frontier around San Andres de Bocay, a town on the Nicaraguan side of the border.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
Spurred by the Nicaraguan offensive on the Honduran border, a bipartisan group of Senate moderates Friday launched an effort to break the congressional stalemate on Contra aid, introducing a $48-million assistance package that would include delivery of some already purchased military supplies for the rebels.
NEWS
May 31, 1987
Members of the Arizona National Guard left for Honduras, their first deployment to Central America since Republican Gov. Evan Mecham reversed his Democratic predecessor's policy against such trips. The 44 civil engineers will spend two weeks repairing and improving living quarters at Palmerola Air Base. Mecham, who took office in January, returned Friday from a trip to Central America and said the Arizona Guard's presence would demonstrate U.S. support and help deter an attack by Nicaragua.
NEWS
May 13, 1987
The Reagan Administration formally notified Congress that it intends to sell 10 F-5E jet fighters and two F-5F jet trainers to Honduras for $75 million, the Pentagon said. The proposal to sell the planes was disclosed last fall, but the number and dollar amount were not announced. Honduras is to pay for the transaction with U.S. military aid funds. Officials said the planes will replace, not supplement, Honduras' existing fleet of jet fighters.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS and DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration faced a key test of credibility this week when the White House announced that it was sending 3,150 U.S. troops to Honduras to counter a Nicaraguan incursion. And by all accounts, the Administration failed. Democrats in Congress accused the White House of "crying wolf." Even members of Congress who sympathize with President Reagan's views on Nicaragua said that his aides inspired little confidence in their portrayal of the situation.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | JILL STEWART and GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writers
About 500 people were arrested in cities across the nation Friday as thousands of demonstrators took to the streets for a second day, clashing with police and stopping traffic, to protest President Reagan's sending of 3,150 U.S. soldiers to Honduras. In skirmishes reminiscent of the Vietnam War era, demonstrators blocked entrances to federal buildings in Chicago, Boston and San Francisco, shouting peace slogans and scuffling with baton-wielding police officers.
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