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United States Military Aid Iraq

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NEWS
December 26, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If U.S. troops go to war against Iraq, the deadliest weapon unleashed on them by Saddam Hussein's forces could be stamped "Made in America." Over the objections of its own engineers, Honeywell Inc. provided agents for Iraq with technology for developing fuel-air explosives, devices 10 times more powerful than conventional weapons and considered by some experts to be "a poor man's nuclear weapons."
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NEWS
March 10, 1999 | JIM MANN
Congress' $97-million man is having a bad day. Ahmad Chalabi, the longtime leader of the Iraqi opposition movement, is sitting on a leather couch in his spacious, quiet, well-furnished office in fashionable Kensington. As aides work the phones and computers nearby, Chalabi recites his usual lament: The Clinton administration won't show the Iraqi exile movement any respect. "There's a problem in the Pentagon," Chalabi mourns.
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NEWS
February 23, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and MURRAY WAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Frantz is a Times staff writer and Waas is a special correspondent.
In the fall of 1989, at a time when Iraq's invasion of Kuwait was only nine months away and Saddam Hussein was desperate for money to buy arms, President Bush signed a top-secret National Security Decision directive ordering closer ties with Baghdad and opening the way for $1 billion in new aid, according to classified documents and interviews. The $1-billion commitment, in the form of loan guarantees for the purchase of U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | Washington Post
The CIA-backed Iraqi National Congress and two Kurdish militias controlling parts of northern Iraq will be among seven Iraqi opposition groups designated by the Clinton administration as eligible to receive $97 million in U.S. military assistance under the Iraq Liberation Act, administration officials said Friday. Officials described the selection of those groups as a first step toward unifying the Iraqi opposition.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | Washington Post
The CIA-backed Iraqi National Congress and two Kurdish militias controlling parts of northern Iraq will be among seven Iraqi opposition groups designated by the Clinton administration as eligible to receive $97 million in U.S. military assistance under the Iraq Liberation Act, administration officials said Friday. Officials described the selection of those groups as a first step toward unifying the Iraqi opposition.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration may have lost an opportunity to overthrow Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein in March by ignoring direct Kurdish pleas for support and rebuffing a separate proposal from the Saudis that the two nations join together to bolster the Kurdish and Shiite insurrections, according to a congressional report released Thursday.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite its official policy of neutrality, the Reagan Administration provided Iraq with secret intelligence and military advice, playing a key role in preparations for an assault that forced Iran to accept a cease-fire, according to a book published Tuesday. The book, "In the Name of God: The Khomeini Decade" by journalist Robin Wright, also says that White House National Security Adviser Robert McFarlane and Lt. Col. Oliver L.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and MURRAY WAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A State Department memo released Thursday provides more details about Bush Administration efforts to relax restrictions on sales of sensitive technology to Iraq and to increase trade in the months before the invasion of Kuwait. Another department memo released Thursday described the results of that policy, explaining that Iraq was able to spend $10 billion to $20 billion to develop nuclear and chemical weapons and "no one was paying attention to the need" to block them.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
A Justice Department special counsel on Tuesday finished a report on whether an independent criminal investigation should be conducted into the Bush Administration's handling of a bank fraud case involving Iraq. The counsel, retired federal judge Frederick B. Lacey, planned to deliver the report to Atty. Gen. William P. Barr's office in the evening, Justice Department spokesman Paul McNulty said.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secret U.S. assistance during the final stages of the eight-year Iran-Iraq War played a critical role in the emergence of Iraq as the only major military power in the Persian Gulf and of its leader, Saddam Hussein, as the region's strongman. Despite its official policy of neutrality during the war, the Reagan Administration advised Baghdad for more than a year on how to reorganize its elite military units and on strategy to retake the oil-rich Faw Peninsula, according to senior U.S. officials.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A book to be published today contends that former President George Bush was personally involved in efforts to keep Congress from getting documents revealing the extent of U.S. assistance to Iraq before the Persian Gulf War. Three unidentified Bush Administration officials are quoted in the book, "Spider's Web," as saying that Bush and his national security adviser, Brent Scowcroft, were the driving force behind the effort to keep the records from congressional committees in 1991 and 1992.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
A Justice Department special counsel on Tuesday finished a report on whether an independent criminal investigation should be conducted into the Bush Administration's handling of a bank fraud case involving Iraq. The counsel, retired federal judge Frederick B. Lacey, planned to deliver the report to Atty. Gen. William P. Barr's office in the evening, Justice Department spokesman Paul McNulty said.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight months ago, the Los Angeles Times published the first in a continuing series of articles charging that the Bush Administration had secretly funneled several billion dollars worth of loan guarantees and military technology to Saddam Hussein from 1986 to 1990. Directly and indirectly, the stories said, this money and materiel gave Hussein the very weapons he later used against American and allied forces in the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Statements by President Bush that U.S. exports did not assist Iraq's development of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons before the Persian Gulf War are contradicted by newly declassified documents, a Democratic congressman charged Wednesday. One of the documents shows that by July, 1990, a month before Iraq invaded Kuwait, the State Department had identified 73 exports approved by the U.S. government that were probably being used in Iraq's ambitious weapons programs.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi Shiite Muslim leaders say they are building support to launch a new popular uprising against President Saddam Hussein, hoping a united opposition front will lure weapons and supplies from the United States, Iran, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Gathering for a crucial meeting in Tehran this week to heal rifts within the Iraqi opposition, Shiite leaders say they have received encouragement from U.S.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and MURRAY WAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the spring of 1989, a CIA officer approached the president of a small engineering firm in Alabama and quizzed him about a carbide-tool manufacturing facility the company was building at an Iraqi government installation southwest of Baghdad. In the fall of that year, a Customs Service agent and an Agriculture Department criminal investigator visited the firm, XYZ Options Inc. in Tuscaloosa, and posed a similar set of questions to its president, William H. Muscarella.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Efforts to appoint an independent counsel to investigate the Bush Administration's covert policies and prewar assistance to Iraq received a boost Wednesday when the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee said his panel will consider the matter. "Some disturbing information has surfaced suggesting that this officially sanctioned policy may have gone as far as to involve violations of federal criminal law," said Judiciary Chairman Jack Brooks (D-Tex.).
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, seeking to quell growing public dismay over the Bush Administration's failure to aid Kurdish and Shiite Muslim rebels in Iraq, said Sunday that the United States kept its distance from the rebellions to avoid "being sucked into a civil war."
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and MURRAY WAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Central Intelligence Agency has acknowledged in a classified report that the agency had strong evidence about Iraq's worldwide effort to buy nuclear weapons technology a month before President Bush signed an order mandating closer ties to Baghdad in the fall of 1989, according to sources. The disclosure was contained in a report provided by the CIA to the Senate Intelligence Committee, two sources familiar with the report said Wednesday.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee has called for a Pentagon investigation into whether Congress was misled by the official account of the downing of an Iranian commercial airliner by a Navy cruiser four years ago. Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) is asking the Pentagon to determine whether the shooting down of the passenger jet occurred during covert operations by the Navy designed to provoke Iranian attacks as part of a U.S. effort to assist Iraq in the final stages of the Iran-Iraq War.
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