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United States Military Aid Latin America

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NEWS
October 27, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After helping persuade the U.S. Congress to stop arming the Contras and "give peace a chance," President Oscar Arias Sanchez of Costa Rica penned an audacious proposal to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev early last year. "I pointed out to him that if he did not do what the Congress had done and stop sending weapons to Central America, he would be responsible for many years of sterile warfare," the Nobel Peace Prize winner said at the time. What he got was a disheartening rebuff.
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NEWS
December 30, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the Bush Administration's use of a military invasion to oust a leader accused of drug trafficking in Panama, U.S. officials are striving to prevent adverse Latin American reaction from hampering its drug-interdiction efforts in other countries in the region. Bush Administration diplomatic officials won agreement this week from the Peruvian government to reverse its declared halt to cooperative drug-fighting operations with U.S. agents in that country.
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NEWS
September 10, 1989
A secret portion of President Bush's anti-drug program authorizes an expanded role for the U.S. military in the drug war in Latin America, the Washington Post reported. A classified national security directive signed by the President includes new rules of engagement that would authorize U.S. Special Forces to accompany local forces on some narcotics patrols, the report said. However, Latin American specialists noted that regional governments are extremely reluctant to request any U.S.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After helping persuade the U.S. Congress to stop arming the Contras and "give peace a chance," President Oscar Arias Sanchez of Costa Rica penned an audacious proposal to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev early last year. "I pointed out to him that if he did not do what the Congress had done and stop sending weapons to Central America, he would be responsible for many years of sterile warfare," the Nobel Peace Prize winner said at the time. What he got was a disheartening rebuff.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the Bush Administration's use of a military invasion to oust a leader accused of drug trafficking in Panama, U.S. officials are striving to prevent adverse Latin American reaction from hampering its drug-interdiction efforts in other countries in the region. Bush Administration diplomatic officials won agreement this week from the Peruvian government to reverse its declared halt to cooperative drug-fighting operations with U.S. agents in that country.
NEWS
September 10, 1989
A secret portion of President Bush's anti-drug program authorizes an expanded role for the U.S. military in the drug war in Latin America, the Washington Post reported. A classified national security directive signed by the President includes new rules of engagement that would authorize U.S. Special Forces to accompany local forces on some narcotics patrols, the report said. However, Latin American specialists noted that regional governments are extremely reluctant to request any U.S.
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