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United States Military Aid Nicaragua

NEWS
August 28, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eugene Hasenfus, who says his life has been on a steady downward slide since being shot down by a Sandinista rocket in 1986 while taking part in the illegal Contra resupply operation, was shot down again here Monday by a federal district court jury considering his claims for back pay and legal fees. After five weeks of testimony and five days of deliberation, the six-member panel found Iran-Contra figure Richard V.
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NEWS
July 24, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the almost four years since he was shot down over Nicaragua, helping to touch off what was to become known as the Iran-Contra scandal, life hasn't been easy for Eugene Hasenfus. He says he was out of work for a year, his three children suffer continuing harassment at school and he is more than $100,000 in debt. In April the family's house in Marinette, Wis., burned down. "I wish I could change history, but I can't," Hasenfus, 49, said here Monday. "I just have to live with it."
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
President Oscar Arias Sanchez said Thursday that the Sandinista rulers in Nicaragua are "bad guys" who have "unmasked themselves" as anti-democratic and deserve to be punished for breaking the Central American peace agreement. In his harshest criticism of the Sandinistas, the author of the peace accord said he was prepared to urge non-military pressures on them to resume peace talks with U.S.-backed Contras and end political repression. He did not spell out any proposed sanctions.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, reminding Democrats of their vice presidential nominee's past support for Contra funding, said Saturday that the Sandinistas' renewed crackdown on political dissent has created an opportunity for "a real bipartisan consensus" in support of new aid for the armed Nicaraguan opposition. In a bid to win Democrats' backing for a new Contra funding bill, Reagan, in his weekly radio address, complained that the Democrat-controlled House "removed the principal prod . . .
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A jury in Miami was selected to decide a lawsuit that blames retired Air Force Major Gen. Richard V. Secord and a CIA-linked airline for the 1986 plane crash in Nicaragua that helped trigger the Iran-Contra probe. Cargo handler Eugene Hasenfus, who was captured and held for about three months after Nicaraguan troops shot down the plane, and the family of the plane's co-pilot, Wallace Sawyer Jr.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
A small freighter that delivered U.S. guns to Nicaraguan rebels at a time when Congress had banned government aid to the contras later took part in an abortive attempt by Lt. Col. Oliver L. North to free American hostages in Lebanon with $1 million in ransom, government and maritime sources said Thursday.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez complained Thursday that continued U.S. aid to Nicaragua's contras is an obstacle to his peace plan for Central America, but he said he does not believe that the Reagan Administration is actively trying to sabotage his proposal. Nicaragua "can't become a pluralistic country if there is war," Arias told a press conference after two days of talks with President Reagan and other U.S. officials.
NEWS
February 27, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Bantam Books is rushing the Tower Commission's report into print, and copies are to be available in bookstores next Monday. "We decided (to publish) because there seemed to be an urgency to its contents that matched the public's potential broad-based fascination with what it has to say," Stuart Applebaum, a vice president of the company, said Thursday.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | United Press International
Assistant Minority Leader Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) accused White House reporters Wednesday of doing a "sadistic little disservice to your country" by asking President Reagan questions about Iran for the sole purpose of "sticking it in his bazoo."
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former White House aide Oliver L. North charged Saturday that President Ronald Reagan knew the secret that lay at the heart of the Iran-Contra affair--the diversion of money from Iranian weapons sales to the Nicaraguan rebels--and lied about it to protect himself from disgrace. But North, in excerpts from his memoirs released on Saturday, offered no concrete evidence to support his charge and conceded that he never spoke to Reagan about the diversion.
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