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NEWS
February 1, 1993 | From Associated Press
Former President George Bush misrepresented his role in the arms-for-hostage deals with Iran while he was vice president, former Secretary of State George P. Shultz says in memoir excerpts published Sunday. In the excerpts, which appear in Time magazine, Shultz says he was "astonished" to read a 1987 interview in the Washington Post in which Bush said no one strongly opposed the arms deals during 1985 and 1986 White House meetings. Shultz remembers those meetings differently.
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NEWS
January 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
The chairman of the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee asked President Clinton on Friday to provide the panel with documents withheld by the George Bush Administration concerning illegal U.S. loans to Iraq. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.) had spearheaded congressional attacks on the Bush Administration's support of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein before the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
January 16, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the Iran-Contra scandal unfolded in 1986, then-Vice President George Bush feared that his loyalty to the scandal-tainted Ronald Reagan Administration could cost him his own chance at the presidency, according to a set of extraordinarily revealing taped diaries released Friday. "Time will tell. My stature will tell. You've got to come out of this with integrity and honor, telling the truth, supporting the President. . . ," Bush said in early December, 1986.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bipartisan House task force said Wednesday that it could find no credible evidence to support charges that Ronald Reagan's top campaign aides, along with then-vice presidential candidate George Bush, agreed in 1980 to supply arms to Iran in exchange for a delay in the release of American hostages until after the election. The findings clear Bush and the late William J.
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush will release excerpts from his diary, as well as testimony he gave to Iran-Contra prosecutors five years ago, in a move intended to demonstrate that he played no illegal role in the affair, the White House said Tuesday. White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said the disclosure, which could come by the end of the week, "will be good for the President because it clearly shows that he doesn't have any involvement here that's questionable in a legal sense."
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Then-Vice President George Bush's sworn statement to Iran-Contra prosecutors in 1988 is on videotape and its release should not be prohibited by grand jury rules, his lawyer, former Atty. Gen. Griffin B. Bell, said in an interview Thursday night. "This was the (vice) president of the United States giving a statement," Bell said. "He wasn't in a grand jury. What sort of country are we running if we're taking secret statements from a President?"
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush retained former Atty. Gen. Griffin B. Bell as his lawyer in the Iran-Contra investigation Wednesday and dismissed as "stupid" any suggestion that his pardoning of key defendants in the case made it appear that government officials are above the law. Bush has asked Bell to help him obtain a transcript of the sworn statement he made to Iran-Contra investigators in 1988 and to take full charge of his defense if independent counsel Lawrence E.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's failure to turn over typewritten notes requested years ago by independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh is not in itself the basis for bringing a criminal charge, legal experts said Sunday. Several legal experts said that Bush's failure to reveal the notes, which Walsh has characterized as "misconduct," is not itself a crime because the prosecutor had not formally subpoenaed them under a court order. Failure to comply with a subpoena can be the basis for a criminal contempt charge.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JACK NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh will return to Washington this week much earlier than planned to decide whether to target President Bush in his investigation of a cover-up of the Iran-Contra scandal. Walsh, concerned that Bush's pardon of former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and five other Iran-Contra figures on Christmas Eve could be an attempt to shut down his investigation, plans to confer with his staff and "conclude whether we should go forward or not."
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a marked difference with many Democrats in Congress, two Democratic leaders--House Speaker Thomas S. Foley of Washington and defense secretary nominee Les Aspin of Wisconsin--had assured President Bush they would support his decision to pardon former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, The Times has learned.
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