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United States Military Aid Pakistan

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August 18, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan pledged Wednesday that U.S. military aid for Pakistan will continue undiminished despite the death in a plane crash of autocratic President Zia ul-Haq, but American foreign policy experts said a period of instability that could damage U.S. policy from Afghanistan to the Persian Gulf is almost a certainty.
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NEWS
October 25, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
A congressional panel agreed provisionally to a one-time waiver of a law against military sales to Pakistan to allow the country to take delivery of millions of dollars worth of U.S. equipment. A House-Senate conference committee accepted as part of a foreign aid bill pending before the panel a plan to resolve a longstanding dispute with Pakistan. It involves shipments of more than $1.4 billion worth of arms.
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NEWS
August 18, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Brig. Gen. Herbert M. Wassom, 49, the Army officer who died Wednesday in the plane crash that killed Pakistani President Zia ul-Haq and U.S. Ambassador Arnold L. Raphel, was a decorated Vietnam War veteran who for the last year had overseen U.S. military aid to Pakistan. Wassom, as chief U.S.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department knew as early as 1983 that Pakistan was engaged in an active nuclear weapons project, but the U.S. government continued to provide military aid to the Islamabad regime for seven more years before cutting it off in 1990, a newly declassified memo showed Tuesday. The continuing aid was in apparent violation of a U.S.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
A congressional panel agreed provisionally to a one-time waiver of a law against military sales to Pakistan to allow the country to take delivery of millions of dollars worth of U.S. equipment. A House-Senate conference committee accepted as part of a foreign aid bill pending before the panel a plan to resolve a longstanding dispute with Pakistan. It involves shipments of more than $1.4 billion worth of arms.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department knew as early as 1983 that Pakistan was engaged in an active nuclear weapons project, but the U.S. government continued to provide military aid to the Islamabad regime for seven more years before cutting it off in 1990, a newly declassified memo showed Tuesday. The continuing aid was in apparent violation of a U.S.
NEWS
October 21, 1987
President Reagan urged visiting Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi to step up efforts with Pakistan to curb the spread of nuclear weapons in the region and received a pledge from Gandhi that India will not build such weapons "unless constrained to do so." Reagan also said U.S. aid to Pakistan is "not directed at India." The United States last year approved a new $4-billion package of military and economic aid for Pakistan.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Senate early today approved $9 million in non-military aid to Nicaragua's Contras as it passed a massive spending bill that also implements part of a deficit-reduction agreement reached last month between the White House and congressional leaders. The vote to provide the additional funding for the Contras was one of several controversial foreign policy provisions attached to the wide-ranging spending bill. Members stood to record their votes, but the total was not announced.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About half a billion dollars a year in U.S. military and economic aid to Pakistan has been frozen and payments cannot be resumed until the Islamabad government curtails programs that seem to be intended to produce nuclear weapons, U.S. officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan on Friday adopted a State Department recommendation to continue U.S. assistance to Pakistan despite evidence that Pakistan tried to smuggle nuclear-weapons material out of the United States--an act that normally would trigger an automatic cutoff of aid. The action effectively releases $480 million in American economic and military assistance for the Pakistanis, who are believed to be developing nuclear weapons in a Third World arms race with India.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About half a billion dollars a year in U.S. military and economic aid to Pakistan has been frozen and payments cannot be resumed until the Islamabad government curtails programs that seem to be intended to produce nuclear weapons, U.S. officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
At a number of critical moments during the long political career of Pakistani President Zia ul-Haq, U.S. Ambassador Arnold L. Raphel was not far away. On July 4, 1977, as a young political officer at the U.S. Embassy here, Raphel walked Zia to his car after the traditional American Independence Day celebration. The two men talked intimately as they walked. They smiled, shook hands and said goodby. A few hours later, Gen.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
President Zia ul-Haq, Pakistan's military ruler, was killed Wednesday along with U.S. Ambassador Arnold L. Raphel, the senior U.S. military attache and 10 senior Pakistani generals when the president's plane exploded in midair moments after takeoff from a remote desert town. The government said it did not rule out the possibility of sabotage.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan pledged Wednesday that U.S. military aid for Pakistan will continue undiminished despite the death in a plane crash of autocratic President Zia ul-Haq, but American foreign policy experts said a period of instability that could damage U.S. policy from Afghanistan to the Persian Gulf is almost a certainty.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Brig. Gen. Herbert M. Wassom, 49, the Army officer who died Wednesday in the plane crash that killed Pakistani President Zia ul-Haq and U.S. Ambassador Arnold L. Raphel, was a decorated Vietnam War veteran who for the last year had overseen U.S. military aid to Pakistan. Wassom, as chief U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan on Friday adopted a State Department recommendation to continue U.S. assistance to Pakistan despite evidence that Pakistan tried to smuggle nuclear-weapons material out of the United States--an act that normally would trigger an automatic cutoff of aid. The action effectively releases $480 million in American economic and military assistance for the Pakistanis, who are believed to be developing nuclear weapons in a Third World arms race with India.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | From Reuters
India's foreign minister Thursday put off a visit to the United States after often bitter parliamentary criticism of U.S. military aid to Pakistan. A government spokesman said the visit by Narayan Dutt Tiwari, scheduled for May 10-16, is being postponed "to a more appropriate time due to unforeseen circumstances." He declined to give further details or explanations. The U.S. Embassy had no immediate comment. The announcement followed two days of debate in Parliament on Indo-U.S. relations.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
At a number of critical moments during the long political career of Pakistani President Zia ul-Haq, U.S. Ambassador Arnold L. Raphel was not far away. On July 4, 1977, as a young political officer at the U.S. Embassy here, Raphel walked Zia to his car after the traditional American Independence Day celebration. The two men talked intimately as they walked. They smiled, shook hands and said goodby. A few hours later, Gen.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Senate early today approved $9 million in non-military aid to Nicaragua's Contras as it passed a massive spending bill that also implements part of a deficit-reduction agreement reached last month between the White House and congressional leaders. The vote to provide the additional funding for the Contras was one of several controversial foreign policy provisions attached to the wide-ranging spending bill. Members stood to record their votes, but the total was not announced.
NEWS
October 21, 1987
President Reagan urged visiting Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi to step up efforts with Pakistan to curb the spread of nuclear weapons in the region and received a pledge from Gandhi that India will not build such weapons "unless constrained to do so." Reagan also said U.S. aid to Pakistan is "not directed at India." The United States last year approved a new $4-billion package of military and economic aid for Pakistan.
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