Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Military Aid Panama
IN THE NEWS

United States Military Aid Panama

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
President Bush said Tuesday that the failed coup in Panama was not "an American operation" but that the Administration supported the aims of the insurgents, and the White House said the United States was informed in advance of the planned uprising. On Capitol Hill, an unusual alliance of Republicans and Democrats criticized Bush for failing to order the U.S. military to assist the rebels to overthrow Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, Panama's de facto ruler.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Refugees from the unsuccessful coup in Panama remained in seclusion in Miami Wednesday as the Bush Administration and Panamanian exiles each tried to put together a coherent account of last week's debacle. Administration officials, seeking to deflect charges that they helped cause the failure by not providing adequate support for the coup, have been working to portray the coup leaders as disorganized bunglers.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 9, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
A top Administration official said Sunday that President Bush's critics in Congress share responsibility for the United States' reluctance to use American military personnel to assist in a coup attempt against Panamanian leader Manuel A. Noriega last week. Brent Scowcroft, Bush's national security adviser, said that Congress, through "micromanagement of the Executive Branch," has historically discouraged Presidents from using military force to topple unpopular leaders of other countries.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The attempted coup against Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega collapsed as plotters argued over whether he should be turned over to the United States, fleeing Panamanian military officers have told U.S. officials. More than three hours into the coup, with rebels in control of the military headquarters and Noriega trapped inside, some rebels argued that he should be delivered for extradition while others insisted on allowing him to remain in Panama.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | SARA FRITZ and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Bush came under growing criticism in Congress on Wednesday for failing to order U.S. troops to assist a coup attempt against Panamanian leader Manuel A. Noriega, and top Administration officials responded with assurances that they have not ruled out the use of force. Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Refugees from the unsuccessful coup in Panama remained in seclusion in Miami Wednesday as the Bush Administration and Panamanian exiles each tried to put together a coherent account of last week's debacle. Administration officials, seeking to deflect charges that they helped cause the failure by not providing adequate support for the coup, have been working to portray the coup leaders as disorganized bunglers.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The attempted coup against Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega collapsed as plotters argued over whether he should be turned over to the United States, fleeing Panamanian military officers have told U.S. officials. More than three hours into the coup, with rebels in control of the military headquarters and Noriega trapped inside, some rebels argued that he should be delivered for extradition while others insisted on allowing him to remain in Panama.
NEWS
October 9, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
A top Administration official said Sunday that President Bush's critics in Congress share responsibility for the United States' reluctance to use American military personnel to assist in a coup attempt against Panamanian leader Manuel A. Noriega last week. Brent Scowcroft, Bush's national security adviser, said that Congress, through "micromanagement of the Executive Branch," has historically discouraged Presidents from using military force to topple unpopular leaders of other countries.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | SARA FRITZ and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Bush came under growing criticism in Congress on Wednesday for failing to order U.S. troops to assist a coup attempt against Panamanian leader Manuel A. Noriega, and top Administration officials responded with assurances that they have not ruled out the use of force. Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
President Bush said Tuesday that the failed coup in Panama was not "an American operation" but that the Administration supported the aims of the insurgents, and the White House said the United States was informed in advance of the planned uprising. On Capitol Hill, an unusual alliance of Republicans and Democrats criticized Bush for failing to order the U.S. military to assist the rebels to overthrow Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, Panama's de facto ruler.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|