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United States Military Aid Persian Gulf

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NEWS
August 4, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Washington pondered its options for military action in the Persian Gulf on Friday, U.S. officials acknowledged that a decade of planning for a very different kind of war in the Mideast had left them with few effective responses to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.
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NEWS
September 30, 1991 | The Times Washington Bureau
ECONOMY BLUES: The Bush Administration is becoming increasingly concerned about the slow pace of the economic recovery. Continuing weakness almost five months after President Bush declared the recession over prompts an agonizing reappraisal among the President and his top economic advisers.
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NEWS
September 30, 1991 | The Times Washington Bureau
ECONOMY BLUES: The Bush Administration is becoming increasingly concerned about the slow pace of the economic recovery. Continuing weakness almost five months after President Bush declared the recession over prompts an agonizing reappraisal among the President and his top economic advisers.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Washington pondered its options for military action in the Persian Gulf on Friday, U.S. officials acknowledged that a decade of planning for a very different kind of war in the Mideast had left them with few effective responses to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | SARA FRITZ and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration, expanding the role of U.S. naval forces in the Persian Gulf, has decided to authorize them to aid some neutral ships under Iranian attack, congressional sources said Friday. The new rules of engagement, which were not publicly announced, go far beyond the role originally prescribed for U.S. forces in the gulf last May, when President Reagan ordered them to begin escorting 11 Kuwaiti oil tankers that had been re-registered under the American flag.
NEWS
September 5, 1988
The U.S. missile cruiser Vincennes, the warship that mistakenly shot down an Iranian jetliner in July at the cost of 290 lives, departed for its home port in the first American force reduction in the Persian Gulf since the Iran-Iraq cease-fire took effect.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | TOM REDBURN and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
In the endless struggle against the federal budget deficit, Congress is counting on pizza lovers to do their part. Last month, the House approved a plan to require frozen pizza makers to tell consumers when they use imitation cheese. That is supposed to encourage buyers to demand pizzas with real cheese--thereby reducing the need for the federal government to purchase surplus milk products from dairy farmers. The presumed savings to the government: $14.5 million a year.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, escalating the U.S. role in the war-ravaged Persian Gulf, Friday authorized American warships and aircraft to protect neutral tankers from attack by Iranian gunboats and missiles. Under the new rules of engagement, which Pentagon officials said would not require an increase in the 27-ship Navy flotilla in the gulf, a U.S. captain may respond to an SOS call from a neutral tanker that comes under attack in the vicinity of an American warship. Defense Secretary Frank C.
NEWS
November 11, 1988
The U.S. Navy warship Dubuque has left the Persian Gulf without being replaced, but no reduction in U.S. forces is under way, a Pentagon spokesman said. The Dubuque was to have been replaced by the Raleigh, but that vessel was delayed en route for emergency repairs. Attention focused on the Dubuque in June after it was reported that the captain of the warship abandoned a disabled junk filled with starving Vietnamese refugees in the South China Sea.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
Reagan Administration officials said Tuesday that they plan to reassess U.S. military operations in the Persian Gulf in the wake of Monday's battles with the Iranian navy, with the possibility that more warships might be added and that protection might be extended to some commercial vessels that do not fly the U.S. flag. U.S. officials, in considering an expansion of the U.S. mission, expressed growing concerns that the naval protection of U.S.
NEWS
November 11, 1988
The U.S. Navy warship Dubuque has left the Persian Gulf without being replaced, but no reduction in U.S. forces is under way, a Pentagon spokesman said. The Dubuque was to have been replaced by the Raleigh, but that vessel was delayed en route for emergency repairs. Attention focused on the Dubuque in June after it was reported that the captain of the warship abandoned a disabled junk filled with starving Vietnamese refugees in the South China Sea.
NEWS
September 5, 1988
The U.S. missile cruiser Vincennes, the warship that mistakenly shot down an Iranian jetliner in July at the cost of 290 lives, departed for its home port in the first American force reduction in the Persian Gulf since the Iran-Iraq cease-fire took effect.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, escalating the U.S. role in the war-ravaged Persian Gulf, Friday authorized American warships and aircraft to protect neutral tankers from attack by Iranian gunboats and missiles. Under the new rules of engagement, which Pentagon officials said would not require an increase in the 27-ship Navy flotilla in the gulf, a U.S. captain may respond to an SOS call from a neutral tanker that comes under attack in the vicinity of an American warship. Defense Secretary Frank C.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Marine Corps said Friday that two Marine helicopter pilots missing since the U.S.-Iranian naval battle in the Persian Gulf April 18 have been declared "killed as a result of hostile action, sustained in combat or relating thereto," and it gave the first indication that the copter had become a target, saying that it had been picked up by hostile radar. A Marine fact-finding board refused to concede that the AH-1T Cobra gunship flown by Capt. Stephen C. Leslie 30, of New Bern, N.C., and Capt.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Iran's Revolutionary Guards on Saturday retrieved wreckage of an American helicopter allegedly shot down by Iranian forces in a showdown with the U.S. Navy, Tehran Radio reported. The broadcast, monitored in Nicosia, said naval units of the Revolutionary Guards found the wreckage in the Persian Gulf and brought it ashore. It said inspection proved the parts belonged "to the U.S. Cobra helicopter which was shot by the Iranian forces and crashed in the gulf" Monday. The U.S.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan warned Iran on Saturday of "very costly" consequences unless it halts military and terrorist attacks in the Persian Gulf and ends its 7 1/2-year war with Iraq. "We do not seek to confront Iran," the President said in his weekly radio address. "However, its leaders must understand that continued military and terrorist attacks against non-belligerents and refusal to negotiate an end to the war will be very costly to Iran and its people."
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Like a battle-scarred whale, the Liberian-registered crude oil tanker Peconic plowed through the Persian Gulf's late-afternoon calm, once again on its way north to take on cargo. Some 25 miles northwest of this gulf trading center, the Peconic, its rusted, patched hull riding high in the water, had rejoined the flow of tankers that carry an estimated one-sixth of the world's oil, despite an increasingly lethal hit-and-run war against them. Following Monday's clashes between Iranian and U.S.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | SARA FRITZ and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration, expanding the role of U.S. naval forces in the Persian Gulf, has decided to authorize them to aid some neutral ships under Iranian attack, congressional sources said Friday. The new rules of engagement, which were not publicly announced, go far beyond the role originally prescribed for U.S. forces in the gulf last May, when President Reagan ordered them to begin escorting 11 Kuwaiti oil tankers that had been re-registered under the American flag.
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