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United States Military Aid Peru

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NEWS
April 26, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the war on drugs, no one in this capital wants to be on the wrong side. But a stubborn squabble between Congress and the Bush Administration this week halted deliveries of weapons both sides agree are crucial to the fight. At issue is a fleet of helicopters slated for the front line in a new U.S.-backed assault against drug traffickers in South America. In the mountainous terrain where coca-growers thrive, the whirlybirds often can be the only way to get around.
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NEWS
February 17, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
If the Lima hostage standoff cannot be resolved peacefully, U.S. and Peruvian paratroopers would plunge into the besieged ambassador's compound from helicopters and storm the mansion, a major Peruvian newspaper reported. The nighttime operation would take only seven minutes but could leave as many as 90 people dead as soldiers seized leftist Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement rebels and tried to rescue 72 hostages from the Japanese ambassador's residence.
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NEWS
September 18, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Praising Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori for improving his country's human rights record, President Bush urged Congress on Tuesday to release $94 million in U.S. aid to support a crop-substitution plan designed to persuade Peru's peasant farmers to abandon cocaine cultivation. "You have made progress on human rights," Bush told Fujimori after their White House meeting, the first between American and Peruvian presidents since 1942.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Praising Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori for improving his country's human rights record, President Bush urged Congress on Tuesday to release $94 million in U.S. aid to support a crop-substitution plan designed to persuade Peru's peasant farmers to abandon cocaine cultivation. "You have made progress on human rights," Bush told Fujimori after their White House meeting, the first between American and Peruvian presidents since 1942.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The United States plans to build a training base where U.S. soldiers will instruct the Peruvian army in jungle warfare to fight leftist rebels, a U.S. Embassy official said. The new base will be built in the coca-rich Upper Huallaga Valley as part of a $35-million U.S. military aid package. The aid is part of President Bush's strategy announced in September to fight the flow of drugs from Andean nations.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | From Reuters
The Bush Administration plans to send military trainers to Peru to help the Peruvian military deal with drug traffickers and guerrillas involved in producing and smuggling cocaine, the New York Times reported in today's edition.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alberto Fujimori, the unexpected front-runner for the Peruvian presidency, says he opposes greater U.S. military and police aid to fight cocaine trafficking unless it is accompanied by a vast program of economic development. Fujimori, the son of Japanese immigrants, said in an interview Wednesday night that the past emphasis on police action against cocaine has shown that "repression has no effectiveness. Just look at the results over the last 10 years."
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
American helicopters and pilots have played a key role in helping Peruvian agents combat cocaine producers in a sometimes-violent campaign, according to Peruvian and U.S. drug enforcement officials. Police Gen. Juan Sarate, the chief anti-drug officer in Peru, said improved Peruvian-U.S. cooperation has led to a surge in coca plant eradication and destruction of clandestine laboratories in recent months in the Upper Huallaga Valley, source of 70% of the world's coca leaf production.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A joint Peruvian-American anti-drug force has launched a major offensive against cocaine traffickers in Peru, staging helicopter-borne raids that destroyed three jungle laboratories in a single day, Peruvian and American officials confirmed Sunday.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration is prepared to dispatch U.S. military advisers and trainers to Peru and Bolivia to join their war against drugs, William J. Bennett, national drug control policy director, said Sunday. "You see now in Colombia the presence of American trainers working with Colombians giving advice, training them on equipment. This is the kind of thing we'd anticipate if Peru and Bolivia take the same steps," Bennett said on ABC's "This Week with David Brinkley."
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | From Reuters
The Bush Administration plans to send military trainers to Peru to help the Peruvian military deal with drug traffickers and guerrillas involved in producing and smuggling cocaine, the New York Times reported in today's edition.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After rejecting $36 million in U.S. military aid to fight drug traffic, Peru is shaping a complex new policy aimed at inducing farmers to stop growing coca leaves, the raw material for cocaine. Peru is the world's biggest producer of coca, and an estimated 1 million Peruvians depend on it for their livelihood.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The weekend election of another staunchly anti-drug president in Colombia was hailed by U.S. officials Monday as providing a crucial opening for a long-postponed, American-backed military crackdown on narcotics traffickers in the region.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Unhappy and unstable marriages between drug traffickers and terrorists are washing South American cocaine trails with blood. In Peru, fanatical Maoist guerrillas have built alliances with peasant growers of coca, the source of cocaine, and with the trafficker organizations. In neighboring Colombia, at different times and in different places, both leftist guerrillas and right-wing death squads have established opportunistic and lethal links with drug lords.
NEWS
May 21, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Coca prices have collapsed in Peru and Bolivia, giving the United States an unprecedented opportunity to strike the traffic in cocaine at its source by helping farmers say no. A crackdown on drug lords in Colombia and tougher enforcement in Peru and Bolivia have reduced demand for coca leaves, the source of cocaine, and prices have come down as a result. Now, thousands of farmers are looking for alternate crops and for help to make the switch.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alberto Fujimori, the unexpected front-runner for the Peruvian presidency, says he opposes greater U.S. military and police aid to fight cocaine trafficking unless it is accompanied by a vast program of economic development. Fujimori, the son of Japanese immigrants, said in an interview Wednesday night that the past emphasis on police action against cocaine has shown that "repression has no effectiveness. Just look at the results over the last 10 years."
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After rejecting $36 million in U.S. military aid to fight drug traffic, Peru is shaping a complex new policy aimed at inducing farmers to stop growing coca leaves, the raw material for cocaine. Peru is the world's biggest producer of coca, and an estimated 1 million Peruvians depend on it for their livelihood.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration, as part of its new offensive against drug producers, has decided to back away from efforts to eradicate coca fields in Peru and Bolivia and to escalate military campaigns to intercept the crops before they reach processing labs, Administration officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the war on drugs, no one in this capital wants to be on the wrong side. But a stubborn squabble between Congress and the Bush Administration this week halted deliveries of weapons both sides agree are crucial to the fight. At issue is a fleet of helicopters slated for the front line in a new U.S.-backed assault against drug traffickers in South America. In the mountainous terrain where coca-growers thrive, the whirlybirds often can be the only way to get around.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The United States plans to build a training base where U.S. soldiers will instruct the Peruvian army in jungle warfare to fight leftist rebels, a U.S. Embassy official said. The new base will be built in the coca-rich Upper Huallaga Valley as part of a $35-million U.S. military aid package. The aid is part of President Bush's strategy announced in September to fight the flow of drugs from Andean nations.
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