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United States Military Aid Philippines

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January 18, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration dispatched Deputy National Security Adviser Robert M. Gates to Manila on Wednesday after U.S. officials privately concluded that President Corazon Aquino's position is so fragile that she may not be able to survive in office through this year. Officially, White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater told reporters at a White House briefing that Gates' mission is "to convey to President Aquino President Bush's continuing strong commitment to democracy in the Philippines."
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NEWS
February 20, 1990 | BOB DROGIN and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the most contentious meeting of his tour of Asian capitals, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Monday faced an angry Philippine Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos, who accused the Bush Administration of reneging on pledges of military and economic aid. Cheney said at a press conference that the United States "would like to do more" to assist the Philippines but that the U.S. Congress is unlikely to restore a $96-million cut in pledged payment for use of six U.S.
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NEWS
February 25, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government has failed to deliver millions of dollars in critically needed medical aid that President Reagan promised the Philippine armed forces when he met with President Corazon Aquino last September. As of Tuesday, less than a third of the $10 million in medical aid that the Reagan Administration pledged as an emergency military appropriation had actually arrived in Manila, according to records at Philippine military headquarters. And the $2.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An adviser to President Bush met Thursday with Philippine President Corazon Aquino to express support for her fragile government and concern that she act decisively to forestall another attempted coup. Robert M. Gates, who is Bush's deputy national security adviser, met with Aquino for 90 minutes. He will meet today with her secretary of defense, Fidel V. Ramos, before returning to Washington.
NEWS
January 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos is seeking to postpone an appearance before a federal grand jury, investigating alleged kickbacks on U.S. aid to his homeland, until the weather warms up in Virginia, an aide said Sunday. Marcos and his wife, Imelda, have been subpoenaed to appear in court in Alexandria, Va., on Jan. 22. "He's willing to go, but the problem is it's too cold for him out there," said Guillermo Trinidad, a spokesman for the couple, who are in exile in Honolulu.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philippine Vice President and opposition leader Salvador H. Laurel declined Saturday night to condemn the armed insurrection in his country and said the rebels "have the right" to try to seize power. Laurel also said that the rebels will not surrender to President Corazon Aquino's forces, as she has demanded. He predicted that the fighting may turn to civil war if reported rebel reinforcements arrive from Cebu, Mindanao and other islands.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | Associated Press
The United States gave 10 more helicopters to the Philippines on Friday to help the nation fight an 18-year-old Communist insurgency. Maj. Gen. Charles Teeter, commander of the Joint U.S. Military Advisory Group, said the UH-1 "Hueys" were a "tangible symbol of strong U.S. support . . . (for President Corazon Aquino) and for the democracy of the Philippines."
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Philippine troops early today continued to battle pockets of rebel holdouts in this capital's financial center, but Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos declared that the attempted coup has been crushed. Manila's international airport, closed for three days because of a the coup attempt, reopened today, an airport spokesman said.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the long run, the Bush Administration's military intervention on behalf of President Corazon Aquino could, ironically, mark the beginning of the end of America's 91-year involvement in the Philippines. For now, the U.S. military move in Manila could help preserve the Aquino government and, with it, two strategic American military facilities, Clark Air Base and Subic Bay Naval Base.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that "we shall not surrender, we will fight," a key leader of the current Philippine coup asserted Saturday that the mutineers had virtually succeeded in "toppling" President Corazon Aquino's government Friday and that the tide turned against the rebellion only after the U.S. military intervened in the conflict. In a telephone interview with The Times from a rebel base in suburban Manila, Brig. Gen. Edgardo M.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration dispatched Deputy National Security Adviser Robert M. Gates to Manila on Wednesday after U.S. officials privately concluded that President Corazon Aquino's position is so fragile that she may not be able to survive in office through this year. Officially, White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater told reporters at a White House briefing that Gates' mission is "to convey to President Aquino President Bush's continuing strong commitment to democracy in the Philippines."
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Philippine troops early today continued to battle pockets of rebel holdouts in this capital's financial center, but Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos declared that the attempted coup has been crushed. Manila's international airport, closed for three days because of a the coup attempt, reopened today, an airport spokesman said.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philippine Vice President and opposition leader Salvador H. Laurel declined Saturday night to condemn the armed insurrection in his country and said the rebels "have the right" to try to seize power. Laurel also said that the rebels will not surrender to President Corazon Aquino's forces, as she has demanded. He predicted that the fighting may turn to civil war if reported rebel reinforcements arrive from Cebu, Mindanao and other islands.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that "we shall not surrender, we will fight," a key leader of the current Philippine coup asserted Saturday that the mutineers had virtually succeeded in "toppling" President Corazon Aquino's government Friday and that the tide turned against the rebellion only after the U.S. military intervened in the conflict. In a telephone interview with The Times from a rebel base in suburban Manila, Brig. Gen. Edgardo M.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. officials, called upon to help Philippine President Corazon Aquino fight off an attempted military coup, turned down requests for U.S. warplanes to bomb rebel-held air bases, fuel dumps and a freighter at sea, senior Bush Administration officials said Saturday. "They wanted more than we gave them, which shows the panic they were in," one official said, talking on condition of anonymity. In the end, he and others said, the United States limited its assistance to flights of U.S.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the long run, the Bush Administration's military intervention on behalf of President Corazon Aquino could, ironically, mark the beginning of the end of America's 91-year involvement in the Philippines. For now, the U.S. military move in Manila could help preserve the Aquino government and, with it, two strategic American military facilities, Clark Air Base and Subic Bay Naval Base.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's order directing U.S. warplanes to help suppress the insurgency in the Philippines was legal under a provision of international law permitting governments under attack to seek outside help, U.S. officials and non-government experts agreed Friday. The President's decision to authorize use of armed force in defense of Philippine President Corazon Aquino's government drew immediate applause from Democrats in Congress, including some who have expressed doubts about involvement of U.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mutinous soldiers attempting to overthrow Philippine President Corazon Aquino refused to surrender early today, launching a fresh attack on army headquarters in this capital city despite heavy air force bombardments. Aquino responded by issuing an ultimatum to the rebels, demanding that they "surrender or die," and making clear that there would be no negotiation.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's order directing U.S. warplanes to help suppress the insurgency in the Philippines was legal under a provision of international law permitting governments under attack to seek outside help, U.S. officials and non-government experts agreed Friday. The President's decision to authorize use of armed force in defense of Philippine President Corazon Aquino's government drew immediate applause from Democrats in Congress, including some who have expressed doubts about involvement of U.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mutinous soldiers attempting to overthrow Philippine President Corazon Aquino refused to surrender early today, launching a fresh attack on army headquarters in this capital city despite heavy air force bombardments. Aquino responded by issuing an ultimatum to the rebels, demanding that they "surrender or die," and making clear that there would be no negotiation.
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