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United States Military Aid Saudi Arabia

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NEWS
August 4, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Washington pondered its options for military action in the Persian Gulf on Friday, U.S. officials acknowledged that a decade of planning for a very different kind of war in the Mideast had left them with few effective responses to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 1992 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Jet Sale May Save Jobs: Hughes Aircraft Co. said the proposed sale of 72 F-15XP fighter jets to Saudi Arabia could save about 200 jobs at its Fullerton plant. The $5.6-billion deal with Saudi Arabia could preserve a total of 500 jobs for at least three years in the Orange County and El Segundo plants, where Hughes workers make radar systems for the F-15, a company spokesman said Monday. The sale of the jets is not guaranteed.
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NEWS
November 21, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is planning to start passing the tin cup overseas once again, seeking a new round of financial contributions from foreign governments to help pay for the mounting costs of the U.S. troop deployment in the Persian Gulf, Administration sources said this week.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudis May Give McDonnell a Boost: Saudi Arabia wants to buy 72 McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle jets, stars of the Gulf War, in a deal that could be worth $4 billion and save 7,000 jobs. If approved by the U.S. government, the tentative deal, announced at the Dubai Air Show in the United Arab Emirates, could extend production of the F-15 by two years--until 1995. The nation's largest defense contractor has faced severe financial pressure as U.S.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
With opposition to an arms sale of more than $20 billion to Saudi Arabia emerging in Congress, the Saudi government served notice Thursday that it will buy weapons elsewhere if the United States backs away from an earlier decision to make the sale. "Saudi Arabia is going to increase its long-term defense forces, and the question is not whether the arms will be bought, but where they will be bought," said Fred Dutton, a longtime Washington representative of the Saudi government. "If the U.S.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush hopes that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will offer to withdraw his country's 193 military advisers from Iraq when the two men meet to discuss the crisis in the Persian Gulf, U.S. officials said Sunday. With an impromptu summit only seven days away, White House and State Department officials launched a furious round of preparations on Sunday to get ready for the conference, the first such U.S.-Soviet meeting ever called on such short notice.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee met privately with Saudi Arabian Ambassador Bandar ibn Sultan the week before last, they thought they were in for a routine update on events in the Persian Gulf. What the Saudi prince told them, however, was about a stunning development here in the nation's capital: The Bush Administration had decided to sell Saudi Arabia more than $20 billion in advanced weapons--the biggest single arms transfer in history. California Rep.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In what would be the largest military sale in U.S. history, the Bush Administration plans to sell Saudi Arabia about $20 billion worth of advanced jets, tanks and other weapons to help bolster the major U.S. ally against future Persian Gulf aggression, U.S. officials said Friday night.
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Bush Administration is ready to approve a $3.2-billion contract enabling Saudi Arabia to buy American-made tanks, Rep. Mike Oxley (R-Ohio) said Thursday. The deal, involving 315 M1-A2 tanks, should be completed by the end of the year, Oxley said. General Dynamics Corp. will build the tanks if the arrangement is wrapped up. By law, Congress must have the chance to say no to the sale. Meanwhile, the New York Times, quoting U.S.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
The armed forces of Saudi Arabia went on maximum military alert after the Mecca riots last month and remain at a high state of readiness as the kingdom formulates a new and more aggressive diplomacy aimed at confronting and weakening Iran in the Muslim world, a well-placed Saudi source said Friday.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration struggled Wednesday to develop a new military plan that could pry loose a team of U.N. arms inspectors from Iraqi control without immediately resorting to use of force, according to senior U.S. officials.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States announced Tuesday that it was sending two battalions of Patriot missile systems to the Middle East on a day when Iraq again detained a U.N. nuclear inspection team in an action condemned by the Security Council. Iraq capitulated late Tuesday to U.N. demands that it provide unrestricted helicopter flights for the inspectors. But the Iraqis' decision to interfere with the 44-member U.N. team in Baghdad angered members of the Security Council.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is planning to start passing the tin cup overseas once again, seeking a new round of financial contributions from foreign governments to help pay for the mounting costs of the U.S. troop deployment in the Persian Gulf, Administration sources said this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the first-grade girls in an Irvine Brownie troop put together a package of notes, drawings and goodies last month to send to a U.S. soldier in the Persian Gulf, they figured that the faceless sergeant would be too busy to answer. But not only did Sgt. William O. Thomas take the time to respond, he wrote all the girls personalized notes in a five-page letter, complimenting each on her artistry and telling one that he unfortunately wouldn't be able to use her phone number.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee met privately with Saudi Arabian Ambassador Bandar ibn Sultan the week before last, they thought they were in for a routine update on events in the Persian Gulf. What the Saudi prince told them, however, was about a stunning development here in the nation's capital: The Bush Administration had decided to sell Saudi Arabia more than $20 billion in advanced weapons--the biggest single arms transfer in history. California Rep.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House, responding to congressional concerns about a new Middle East arms race in the making, agreed Friday to scale back a proposed emergency sale of planes, tanks and other sophisticated military hardware to Saudi Arabia.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudis May Give McDonnell a Boost: Saudi Arabia wants to buy 72 McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle jets, stars of the Gulf War, in a deal that could be worth $4 billion and save 7,000 jobs. If approved by the U.S. government, the tentative deal, announced at the Dubai Air Show in the United Arab Emirates, could extend production of the F-15 by two years--until 1995. The nation's largest defense contractor has faced severe financial pressure as U.S.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and King Fahd agreed Thursday on the outlines of a multibillion-dollar Saudi payment for U.S. military operations in the Persian Gulf and to cushion the impact of the crisis on poor front-line countries such as Egypt and Turkey. U.S.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
With opposition to an arms sale of more than $20 billion to Saudi Arabia emerging in Congress, the Saudi government served notice Thursday that it will buy weapons elsewhere if the United States backs away from an earlier decision to make the sale. "Saudi Arabia is going to increase its long-term defense forces, and the question is not whether the arms will be bought, but where they will be bought," said Fred Dutton, a longtime Washington representative of the Saudi government. "If the U.S.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In what would be the largest military sale in U.S. history, the Bush Administration plans to sell Saudi Arabia about $20 billion worth of advanced jets, tanks and other weapons to help bolster the major U.S. ally against future Persian Gulf aggression, U.S. officials said Friday night.
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