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United States Military Aid Somalia

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NEWS
February 7, 1989
The United States secretly cut off shipments of ammunition and other lethal equipment to Somalia last summer in response to widespread human rights violations during a campaign against guerrillas, U.S. officials said. The aid suspension came to light as Prime Minister Mohammed Ali Samantar concluded a U.S. visit aimed partly at bolstering Somalia's international image.
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NEWS
June 13, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. raids in Somalia represent a quantum leap for international peacekeeping, redefining the rules of engagement and intervention in ways that could set precedents for future operations in areas far beyond the troubled Horn of Africa. The offensive strikes against warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid and his militia contrast sharply with other peacekeeping operations in which U.N. "blue helmets," outnumbered and outgunned by local forces, merely monitor rather than keep the peace.
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NEWS
June 13, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. raids in Somalia represent a quantum leap for international peacekeeping, redefining the rules of engagement and intervention in ways that could set precedents for future operations in areas far beyond the troubled Horn of Africa. The offensive strikes against warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid and his militia contrast sharply with other peacekeeping operations in which U.N. "blue helmets," outnumbered and outgunned by local forces, merely monitor rather than keep the peace.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. forces launched a second overnight attack on Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid early today after an earlier air and ground assault that destroyed most of Aidid's arsenal and demonstrated the United Nations' ability to back its mandates with military force. Explosions rocked the capital, Mogadishu, beginning about 12:45 a.m. local time (2:45 p.m. PDT) and lasting about 20 minutes, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. forces launched a second overnight attack on Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid early today after an earlier air and ground assault that destroyed most of Aidid's arsenal and demonstrated the United Nations' ability to back its mandates with military force. Explosions rocked the capital, Mogadishu, beginning about 12:45 a.m. local time (2:45 p.m. PDT) and lasting about 20 minutes, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, moving to meet the most serious challenge yet to U.S. policy in Somalia, took new steps Wednesday to strengthen U.N. firepower there in preparation for likely military action to quell the recent wave of clan insurgency. In a surprise move, the Pentagon ordered to the Somali capital of Mogadishu four Air Force AC-130 Spectre gunships capable of providing air support for troops or wiping out Somali weapons and arms caches.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, moving to meet the most serious challenge yet to U.S. policy in Somalia, took new steps Wednesday to strengthen U.N. firepower there in preparation for likely military action to quell the recent wave of clan insurgency. In a surprise move, the Pentagon ordered to the Somali capital of Mogadishu four Air Force AC-130 Spectre gunships capable of providing air support for troops or wiping out Somali weapons and arms caches.
NEWS
February 7, 1989
The United States secretly cut off shipments of ammunition and other lethal equipment to Somalia last summer in response to widespread human rights violations during a campaign against guerrillas, U.S. officials said. The aid suspension came to light as Prime Minister Mohammed Ali Samantar concluded a U.S. visit aimed partly at bolstering Somalia's international image.
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