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United States Military Aid South Korea

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NEWS
February 19, 1987 | From Reuters
The United States and South Korea will begin huge joint military maneuvers today despite protests from North Korea, which charges that the scheduled 10-week exercise is a preparation for war. About 200,000 American and South Korean troops will take part in Team Spirit 87, the latest edition of annual exercises first staged on the peninsula in 1976. The exercise is billed as the largest in the non-communist world. Units from U.S.
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NEWS
January 26, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is considering sending Patriot anti-missile batteries to South Korea to strengthen U.S. forces there and help discourage any possible attacks by North Korea, officials here said Tuesday. The move, which still requires a final decision by the President, was requested two weeks ago by Gen. Gary Luck, commander of U.S. forces in Korea, in the face of a continuing buildup of North Korean troops along the border.
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NEWS
May 17, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writers
The Olympic clock is ticking: On small digital displays in hotels and government offices and on a huge scoreboard mounted above the plaza in front of City Hall, South Koreans are counting the days until the Olympic Games begin Sept. 17. But it is early August that many observers of North Korea, worried about terrorist attacks, are anxiously awaiting.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush held out the prospect today that the United States will expand its ties to North Korea as an incentive to the Pyongyang regime to open its nuclear facilities to inspection. As a first step, Bush announced the conditional cancellation of joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises known as "Team Spirit" that for decades have served as a symbol of the nations' shared resolve against the north.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush held out the prospect today that the United States will expand its ties to North Korea as an incentive to the Pyongyang regime to open its nuclear facilities to inspection. As a first step, Bush announced the conditional cancellation of joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises known as "Team Spirit" that for decades have served as a symbol of the nations' shared resolve against the north.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and South Korean officials announced Thursday that the United States will withdraw part of its armed force here and gradually relinquish its dominant role in the military alliance between the two countries, eventually turning over all major commands to South Korean officers. The plan disclosed by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and South Korean Defense Minister Lee Sang Hoon would fundamentally alter the 37-year-old security arrangement between the two countries.
NEWS
March 21, 1988
North Korea ordered a full combat alert of all its armed forces in response to current U.S.-South Korean military maneuvers, the official North Korean News Agency said. "This is a self-defense measure to cope with the new war provocation moves of the U.S. imperialists and the South Korean military clique," the news agency said.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
In its strongest reaction so far to the current outbreak of political unrest in South Korea, the Reagan Administration on Monday warned that nation's military commanders not to interfere with the political process now under way. Any sort of military intervention in the still-tense situation there would be a "serious disservice" to South Korean interests, State Department spokeswomen Phyllis Oakley said at a briefing.
SPORTS
September 13, 1987
The United States is willing to deploy warships and planes to South Korea to protect the 1988 Olympic Games from attacks by terrorists or North Korea, Assistant Secretary of Defense Richard Armitage said in Seoul. Armitage said discussions are continuing with South Korean military officials to decide what types of security measures will be needed to guarantee the safety of the Games.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is considering removing U.S. nuclear warheads from South Korea as part of a concerted effort to get North Korea to halt the continuing development of its own nuclear weapons program, Administration officials say. A withdrawal of American nuclear weapons from South Korea would alter a longstanding and sacrosanct element in American security policy in Asia. The United States is generally believed to have kept such warheads in South Korea since the Korean War, although U.S.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government said it has sent two squadrons of Hawk ground-to-air missiles to southeastern Turkey to supplement two Dutch Patriot missile squadrons already operating in Diyarbakir in the same area. Foreign Minister Hans van den Broek announced the deployment, saying the Netherlands is concentrating its military aid to coalition partners "in certain regions."
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and South Korean officials announced Thursday that the United States will withdraw part of its armed force here and gradually relinquish its dominant role in the military alliance between the two countries, eventually turning over all major commands to South Korean officers. The plan disclosed by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and South Korean Defense Minister Lee Sang Hoon would fundamentally alter the 37-year-old security arrangement between the two countries.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | JIM MANN and SARA FRITZ and JANICE ARKATOV, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration and South Korea are for the first time apparently resigning themselves to the withdrawal of some U.S. troops from South Korea over the next few years. Congressional pressure and South Korea's increasing economic power and military capability make it all but certain that the Administration eventually will be required to reduce the number of U.S. troops in Korea below the current level of 43,000.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The Senate dealt a serious blow Tuesday to the "Star Wars" missile defense system by rejecting any increase in spending for the program in the fiscal year starting Oct. 1. It was the first time that the Senate has cast a vote against "Star Wars," a missile interceptor program known officially as the Strategic Defense Initiative.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Casting aside security concerns to take a closer look at one of the world's tensest borders, Vice President Dan Quayle today became the highest-ranking U.S. official ever to visit this truce village in the Korean demilitarized zone. While American Presidents and vice presidents have visited South Korea and the DMZ on several occasions, they have avoided trips to Panmunjom because of the proximity of North Korean troops and the difficulty of ensuring security.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Talks aimed at opening a new channel of dialogue between North and South Korea got off to a dubious beginning Wednesday as delegates from the north pressed their demands that the south abandon plans for annual joint military exercises with the United States.
NEWS
March 3, 1989
South and North Korean officials met for nearly three hours but failed to make any progress toward setting up a meeting of their prime ministers because of differences over joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises. But they agreed to meet again April 12 at the truce village of Panmunjom, 35 miles north of Seoul. The north wants the annual exercises scrapped.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Talks aimed at opening a new channel of dialogue between North and South Korea got off to a dubious beginning Wednesday as delegates from the north pressed their demands that the south abandon plans for annual joint military exercises with the United States.
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