Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Military Aid Turkey
IN THE NEWS

United States Military Aid Turkey

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pivotal American ally from the opening round of the Persian Gulf crisis, Turkey is settling in for a long siege, exerting tough economic, military and psychological pressure on neighboring Iraq. So far this week, Turkey has welcomed nearly two dozen U.S. F-16 interceptors to an air base in the south that is already crowded with American ordnance, and it has extended by a year the expiring leases on more than a dozen American bases and listening posts on Turkish soil.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Saturday that the flare-up of fighting in northern Iraq concerned him, but that the immediate problem there involving the Kurdish minority appears to be "getting resolved," and he indicated he saw no immediate role for U.S. troops in the situation. Bush spoke at a news conference as he pressed ahead with efforts to demonstrate an increased commitment to Turkey in the wake of Ankara's speedy opposition to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait last Aug. 2.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush plans to reward Turkey for its support in the Persian Gulf crisis by transferring $82 million worth of ammunition and military equipment from U.S. stocks, Administration and congressional sources said Wednesday. The gesture is at least the third such direct financial reward to allies in the region opposing Iraq's occupation of Kuwait. Bush forgave nearly $7 billion in military debts owed by Egypt.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, opening the first visit by a U.S. President to Greece and Turkey since 1959, pressed the Greek government of Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis on Thursday to settle the 17-year dispute over Cyprus, "and do so this year." Taking the unusual step of interjecting himself immediately and publicly into a dispute in which the United States has had relatively little involvement, Bush pledged U.S. assistance to Greece, Turkey and Cyprus.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country, a front-line American ally that has already paid a stiff price for its hard line against Baghdad, greets Secretary of State James A. Baker III today, fearful of war but officially unflinching in its support for the United States. What is less clear is whether Turkey would be drawn into ground fighting on a second, northern front. For the record, both Turkish President Turgut Ozal and Iraqi President Saddam Hussein rule out a second front.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Saturday that the flare-up of fighting in northern Iraq concerned him, but that the immediate problem there involving the Kurdish minority appears to be "getting resolved," and he indicated he saw no immediate role for U.S. troops in the situation. Bush spoke at a news conference as he pressed ahead with efforts to demonstrate an increased commitment to Turkey in the wake of Ankara's speedy opposition to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait last Aug. 2.
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Turgut Ozal said he has ruled out the idea of a Turkish "second front" against northern Iraq that might relieve U.S. and allied forces if they attack on the south to free Iraqi-occupied Kuwait. "This second-front question is pure fantasy," Ozal told reporters over the weekend in a statement that Turkey's state radio and television underlined by making it their lead news item.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States will give Turkey, which has provided military and political support in the Gulf War, an extra $82 million in military aid this year, the U.S. Embassy in Ankara announced. Turkey, the only NATO country bordering Iraq, has let U.S. planes launch bombing raids from its territory. The embassy said Washington had agreed to provide military aid worth $82 million in addition to $553.4 million in grants announced earlier this month.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, opening the first visit by a U.S. President to Greece and Turkey since 1959, pressed the Greek government of Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis on Thursday to settle the 17-year dispute over Cyprus, "and do so this year." Taking the unusual step of interjecting himself immediately and publicly into a dispute in which the United States has had relatively little involvement, Bush pledged U.S. assistance to Greece, Turkey and Cyprus.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Former Secretary of State Dean Rusk has revealed that President John F. Kennedy was prepared in October, 1962, to arrange the withdrawal of U.S. missiles from Turkey to get the Soviet Union to pull its missiles out of Cuba and thus resolve the explosive Cuban missile crisis. Rusk confirmed a New York Times report Friday that Kennedy composed a message to be passed to U.N. Secretary General U Thant asking that the United Nations sponsor a plan for mutual withdrawals.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakfast rooms and bars of Ankara hotels, so lately vacant in grim winter uncertainty, now buzz with the polyglot crackle of deals-in-the-making. Waiters back from compulsory vacations skitter busily among buyers and sellers rebuilding bridges severed by months of crisis that climaxed in war. Everybody acknowledges that Muslim, secular and democratic Turkey, a four-square U.S. ally, stands proudly among the winners in the Persian Gulf War. What is less clear as Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States will give Turkey, which has provided military and political support in the Gulf War, an extra $82 million in military aid this year, the U.S. Embassy in Ankara announced. Turkey, the only NATO country bordering Iraq, has let U.S. planes launch bombing raids from its territory. The embassy said Washington had agreed to provide military aid worth $82 million in addition to $553.4 million in grants announced earlier this month.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush plans to reward Turkey for its support in the Persian Gulf crisis by transferring $82 million worth of ammunition and military equipment from U.S. stocks, Administration and congressional sources said Wednesday. The gesture is at least the third such direct financial reward to allies in the region opposing Iraq's occupation of Kuwait. Bush forgave nearly $7 billion in military debts owed by Egypt.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country, a front-line American ally that has already paid a stiff price for its hard line against Baghdad, greets Secretary of State James A. Baker III today, fearful of war but officially unflinching in its support for the United States. What is less clear is whether Turkey would be drawn into ground fighting on a second, northern front. For the record, both Turkish President Turgut Ozal and Iraqi President Saddam Hussein rule out a second front.
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Turgut Ozal said he has ruled out the idea of a Turkish "second front" against northern Iraq that might relieve U.S. and allied forces if they attack on the south to free Iraqi-occupied Kuwait. "This second-front question is pure fantasy," Ozal told reporters over the weekend in a statement that Turkey's state radio and television underlined by making it their lead news item.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pivotal American ally from the opening round of the Persian Gulf crisis, Turkey is settling in for a long siege, exerting tough economic, military and psychological pressure on neighboring Iraq. So far this week, Turkey has welcomed nearly two dozen U.S. F-16 interceptors to an air base in the south that is already crowded with American ordnance, and it has extended by a year the expiring leases on more than a dozen American bases and listening posts on Turkish soil.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakfast rooms and bars of Ankara hotels, so lately vacant in grim winter uncertainty, now buzz with the polyglot crackle of deals-in-the-making. Waiters back from compulsory vacations skitter busily among buyers and sellers rebuilding bridges severed by months of crisis that climaxed in war. Everybody acknowledges that Muslim, secular and democratic Turkey, a four-square U.S. ally, stands proudly among the winners in the Persian Gulf War. What is less clear as Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
August 29, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Former Secretary of State Dean Rusk has revealed that President John F. Kennedy was prepared in October, 1962, to arrange the withdrawal of U.S. missiles from Turkey to get the Soviet Union to pull its missiles out of Cuba and thus resolve the explosive Cuban missile crisis. Rusk confirmed a New York Times report Friday that Kennedy composed a message to be passed to U.N. Secretary General U Thant asking that the United Nations sponsor a plan for mutual withdrawals.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|