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United States Military Assaults Afghanistan

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NEWS
February 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here was the U.S. military in Afghanistan: a bearded soldier riding horseback in a storm of desert sand, looking like something out of "Lawrence of Arabia." But instead of a dagger, he carried a global positioning system, a sophisticated radio transmitter and a laser for marking targets. Flying 35,000 feet above him was a Vietnam-era bomber that had seemed headed for the scrap heap--until the Pentagon loaded it with smart bombs and linked its pilot with the guy on horseback. Since Sept.
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NEWS
March 30, 2002 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first U.S. soldier killed in Operation Anaconda this month in Afghanistan may have been hit by fire from an American warplane, in an attack that caused a major setback in the battle, the Pentagon disclosed Friday. The Pentagon also released a report that acknowledges some errors--but largely defends the military's conduct--in a series of "friendly fire" and other "incidents that warranted review" in Afghanistan.
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NEWS
November 23, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one could be more delighted about the departure of the Taliban regime than the opium poppy growers here in eastern Afghanistan. In July 2000, the Taliban's leader, Mullah Mohammed Omar, issued an edict banning poppy cultivation across Afghanistan, then the world's largest producer of the flower pod used to make heroin. For years, the Taliban had used taxes on drugs to finance its military. That all changed, however, with Omar's eight-line message. According to a recent report by the U.N.
NEWS
February 22, 2002 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Tajik and Uzbek soldiers are fanning out across the mountains here in search of a one-legged former Taliban mullah infamous for meting out medieval punishments and dispatching prisoners with his own hands. Aided by a contingent of U.S. Special Forces troops, the soldiers, some on horseback, others in tanks, are searching village by village for Mullah Dadullah, the former Taliban deputy defense minister.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
In a surprise announcement, Afghanistan's ruling Taliban militia said Saturday that it is willing to engage the United States in wide-ranging talks that could include the status of suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden. The U.S. government maintains that Bin Laden masterminded the twin bombings of its embassies in Kenya and Tanzania last year and that it wants him deported to the United States to stand trial.
NEWS
October 31, 1999 | From Associated Press
Osama bin Laden, wanted by the United States for the bombing of two American embassies last year, has asked for permission to leave Afghanistan, the ruling Taliban religious army said Saturday. Bin Laden's departure could lift the threat of U.N. sanctions on Afghanistan, where he has been living for years. The Taliban has resisted pressure from the United States to hand him over to be tried on charges of planning the bombing of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania that killed 224 people.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | MEGAN K. STACK and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a day of intense negotiation and heavy bombing, Afghan tribal commanders said Wednesday that they have given hundreds of Al Qaeda fighters a new ultimatum: Climb down from their mountain hide-out, surrender themselves and their weapons and hand over Osama bin Laden, or face further assault. "We want Osama alive," commander Hazrat Ali said. "If they don't give us Osama, we are preparing ourselves for a big offensive."
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The failure so far to capture Osama bin Laden is forcing the Bush administration to confront the possibility that he may remain at large for some time, a development that could complicate the campaign in Afghanistan and cause political repercussions at home. After weeks of military victories, expectations have been growing in the United States that American forces could soon wrap up their effort in Afghanistan and move triumphantly to other fronts.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | DAVID LAMB and JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tribal militiamen wearing sneakers and sandals overran the Al Qaeda terrorists' last bastion in Afghanistan on Sunday after two weeks of fierce fighting but found no trace of Osama bin Laden, commanders said.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a night visiting young troops standing guard in the freezing winter air of Central Asia, Marine Commandant Gen. James Jones was asked what impact the Afghanistan campaign will have on the Corps. He didn't hesitate. The Marines' success here, he said, may finally silence critics who say that the Corps is a fine amphibious assault force but that its combat effectiveness declines drastically when it gets more than a few hundred miles from the beach.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here was the U.S. military in Afghanistan: a bearded soldier riding horseback in a storm of desert sand, looking like something out of "Lawrence of Arabia." But instead of a dagger, he carried a global positioning system, a sophisticated radio transmitter and a laser for marking targets. Flying 35,000 feet above him was a Vietnam-era bomber that had seemed headed for the scrap heap--until the Pentagon loaded it with smart bombs and linked its pilot with the guy on horseback. Since Sept.
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As John Walker Lindh returned to U.S. soil to face conspiracy charges, the Pentagon on Wednesday abruptly suspended all future transfers of Al Qaeda suspects from Afghanistan to the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba, saying that U.S. intelligence officials need more time to prepare for interrogations.
NEWS
January 23, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rising to counter mounting criticism after months of favorable world opinion for the war effort, U.S. officials forcefully denied Tuesday that Al Qaeda suspects are being treated inhumanely at a makeshift military prison in Cuba. In the last few days, critics ranging from members of British Parliament to U.S.
NEWS
January 18, 2002 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once in a while, Sath Mohammed smiles. On this day it happens as the 11-year-old describes his beloved sport, Afghan wrestling. The thought of it brings a look of delight to his face. He reaches an arm into the air as if to grab an opponent. Then he moves a leg--or what is left of it--and his face goes blank. For a moment, he had forgotten that he lies in bed No. 9 under a crudely lettered sign that reads "Bomb Blast Victim" and will never wrestle again.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN and ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. refueling plane crashed into a mountain in Pakistan, killing all seven Marines aboard Wednesday in a day of setbacks for the Pentagon that included the release--despite U.S. protests--of three top Taliban officials by their Afghan captors. As workers made their way toward the wreckage of the KC-130 tanker, witnesses described flames rising from the crash site near Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cells are boxes of chain-link fence with concrete floors and thick-planked wood roofs. The beds are mats on the floor. The jailers are gun-toting infantrymen, military police with attack-trained German shepherds and artillerymen in Humvees. And the inmates are "the worst of the worst," said the prison's commander--the toughest of the Al Qaeda and Taliban members currently held by the U.S. military in Afghanistan.
NEWS
December 14, 2001 | MEGAN K. STACK and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As furious fighting swept the hillsides here Thursday, killing dozens of anti-Taliban soldiers, it seemed likely that fruitless attempts to broker the surrender of besieged Al Qaeda fighters may have done more harm than good.
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
After missteps and recriminations following the Sept. 11 terror attacks, the United States and Saudi Arabia appear to have repaired their alliance and are cooperating well in the war on terrorism, officials in both governments say. But over the long run, senior Bush administration officials say, the two countries' relationship is probably headed for more changes--including a possible decrease in U.S. troop presence in Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | KIM MURPHY and LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It didn't matter what it was, his buddies said, Nate Chapman wanted to be there. Lending a hand. Doing the hard stuff. "There's a couple times where he'd be halfway dressed, running down the hallway, trying to catch up. You know, he never wanted to be left behind, he always wanted to be right there, willing to help and give a hand," Sgt. 1st Class William Pence said Saturday, fighting back tears as he recalled his Army comrade of 14 years, Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Ross Chapman, the first U.S.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the hunt for Osama bin Laden and Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar continued Tuesday, American defense officials confirmed that U.S. Marines were helping with "information gathering" at a former Taliban stronghold in southern Afghanistan. The Marines have been "actively doing a search . . . in the Helmand province west of Kandahar," while Special Forces have been working with anti-Taliban soldiers in the region, said Army Col. Rick Thomas at the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Fla.
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