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United States Military Assaults Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
August 18, 1992 | JOHN BRENNAN, TIMES POLL DIRECTOR
Americans support the use of U.S. air power to keep humanitarian aid flowing into Bosnia-Herzegovina but are divided over whether this country should commit ground troops in the Balkan conflict, a new Los Angeles Times Poll has found. The national survey of 1,460 adults, conducted over three days ending Friday, also shows that most of those polled now think President Bush has been too lenient in his dealings with Iraq.
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NEWS
June 10, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite calls from Congress and within the Air Force for air strikes to destroy missile batteries in Bosnia-Herzegovina such as the one that shot down a U.S. F-16 last week, the Clinton Administration has ruled out such action as long as Bosnian Serb forces hold United Nations troops hostage, officials said Friday. President Clinton's advisers considered proposals for military retaliation against the Serb rebels after Air Force Capt. Scott F.
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NEWS
April 13, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bosnian Serb rebels hardened their defiance of the outside world Tuesday, ordering troops to shoot down NATO warplanes, laying mines to trap U.N. peacekeepers and rebuffing high-level diplomats seeking to rescue abandoned peace talks. Bosnian government forces clashed with Serbs in the U.N. safe area of Gorazde, but the fighting was reported to be less intense than on the previous day, and the U.N. commander for Bosnia-Herzegovina blamed Muslim-led government units for starting it.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The escalating warfare between Bosnian Serb forces and U.N. peacekeepers in Bosnia-Herzegovina claimed another casualty Thursday: plans for greater cooperation between Russia and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei D. Kozyrev announced in Moscow that he has postponed Russia's entry into the "Partnership for Peace," President Clinton's program for increased cooperation between NATO and the former Communist nations of Eastern Europe.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite calls from Congress and within the Air Force for air strikes to destroy missile batteries in Bosnia-Herzegovina such as the one that shot down a U.S. F-16 last week, the Clinton Administration has ruled out such action as long as Bosnian Serb forces hold United Nations troops hostage, officials said Friday. President Clinton's advisers considered proposals for military retaliation against the Serb rebels after Air Force Capt. Scott F.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As President Clinton prepares to commit U.S. forces to end the bitter civil war in the Balkans or enforce a shaky peace, he will have to try to sell an acutely skeptical public on a policy that could cost American lives. Clinton and his aides have insisted that no final decision has been made about dispatching U.S. air or ground forces to Bosnia-Herzegovina, but they expressed clear recognition that such a step could be an unavoidable part of the diplomatic process they have set in motion.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Clinton Administration officials were hopeful Monday that the combination of air strikes near Gorazde and a Russian diplomatic mission to the Serbian capital would provide the stick and carrot needed to get Bosnian Serbs to resume negotiating an end to the bloody civil war.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Wednesday that he is ready to order American air strikes against Serbian forces in Bosnia-Herzegovina, if the United Nations requests action to protect its troops there, and U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali said he will authorize such requests beginning next week. "We are prepared to move, if we are asked to provide that assistance by the secretary general," Clinton told reporters at the White House.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Uniting in a new warning to Serbian forces in Bosnia, the United States and its NATO allies have agreed on a plan to use air strikes to aid the beleaguered defenders of Sarajevo, NATO officials declared Monday. Under the agreement, U.S.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian rebels, angered by a NATO air attack, provoked a second bombing raid Monday by defiantly intensifying an artillery assault on the city of Gorazde, barricading U.N. troops in Sarajevo and severing contacts with mediators trying to broker peace. Serbian tank and artillery fire on the densely populated eastern city that is a U.N.-designated "safe haven" continued even after two U.S. jets bombed rebel artillery positions for a second day.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bosnian Serb rebels hardened their defiance of the outside world Tuesday, ordering troops to shoot down NATO warplanes, laying mines to trap U.N. peacekeepers and rebuffing high-level diplomats seeking to rescue abandoned peace talks. Bosnian government forces clashed with Serbs in the U.N. safe area of Gorazde, but the fighting was reported to be less intense than on the previous day, and the U.N. commander for Bosnia-Herzegovina blamed Muslim-led government units for starting it.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Tuesday warned Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovina against trying to take advantage of the allied air strikes outside the city of Gorazde by intensifying their fight against the Bosnian Serbs, saying both sides must now go back to the peace table. "We have cautioned the Bosnian government forces not to try to take advantage of this and violate the understandings themselves," Clinton told reporters here.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Clinton Administration officials were hopeful Monday that the combination of air strikes near Gorazde and a Russian diplomatic mission to the Serbian capital would provide the stick and carrot needed to get Bosnian Serbs to resume negotiating an end to the bloody civil war.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian rebels, angered by a NATO air attack, provoked a second bombing raid Monday by defiantly intensifying an artillery assault on the city of Gorazde, barricading U.N. troops in Sarajevo and severing contacts with mediators trying to broker peace. Serbian tank and artillery fire on the densely populated eastern city that is a U.N.-designated "safe haven" continued even after two U.S. jets bombed rebel artillery positions for a second day.
NEWS
April 11, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two U.S. jet fighters bombed Bosnian Serb artillery positions outside the eastern enclave of Gorazde on Sunday, halting a fierce rebel offensive in its tracks and delivering the first punishing air strikes after months of U.N. threats. Launched by NATO, the bombing run was the alliance's first-ever air attack on ground positions. It came more than three hours after a final U.N.
NEWS
April 11, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday's air attack by two U.S. F-16C fighters on Bosnian Serb forces outside the besieged Bosnian city of Gorazde crossed a line from which Western political leaders had tiptoed away from for two years: It suddenly escalated the role of the United States and its European allies in the intractable Balkans warfare. The bombing run had only a limited military purpose, but its political message packed a wallop.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after NATO threatened aerial bombing raids against Serbian troops in Bosnia, their leader on Tuesday denounced the decision as one that further fans, rather than extinguishes, the fires of war blazing in the Balkans. Radovan Karadzic charged that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's dramatic change in policy late Monday had sabotaged the peace talks in Geneva and emboldened Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic to stay away for the second straight day.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The escalating warfare between Bosnian Serb forces and U.N. peacekeepers in Bosnia-Herzegovina claimed another casualty Thursday: plans for greater cooperation between Russia and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei D. Kozyrev announced in Moscow that he has postponed Russia's entry into the "Partnership for Peace," President Clinton's program for increased cooperation between NATO and the former Communist nations of Eastern Europe.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after NATO threatened aerial bombing raids against Serbian troops in Bosnia, their leader on Tuesday denounced the decision as one that further fans, rather than extinguishes, the fires of war blazing in the Balkans. Radovan Karadzic charged that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's dramatic change in policy late Monday had sabotaged the peace talks in Geneva and emboldened Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic to stay away for the second straight day.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Uniting in a new warning to Serbian forces in Bosnia, the United States and its NATO allies have agreed on a plan to use air strikes to aid the beleaguered defenders of Sarajevo, NATO officials declared Monday. Under the agreement, U.S.
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