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United States Military Assaults Cuba

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NEWS
March 15, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN and DOLLY MASCARENAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Thomas "Pete" Ray's B-26 bomber was shot down by Cuban antiaircraft batteries near Playa Giron on April 19, 1961, he wasn't there. So said the CIA. And for decades, the U.S. government publicly denied that a top-secret squadron of civilians recruited from the Alabama Air National Guard ever existed, let alone was on a CIA mission to bomb Cuba in one of the agency's best-kept and most humiliating secrets.
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NEWS
March 15, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN and DOLLY MASCARENAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Thomas "Pete" Ray's B-26 bomber was shot down by Cuban antiaircraft batteries near Playa Giron on April 19, 1961, he wasn't there. So said the CIA. And for decades, the U.S. government publicly denied that a top-secret squadron of civilians recruited from the Alabama Air National Guard ever existed, let alone was on a CIA mission to bomb Cuba in one of the agency's best-kept and most humiliating secrets.
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NEWS
July 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council adopted a cautiously worded resolution stating that Cuba's downing of two unarmed U.S. civilian planes Feb. 24 was unlawful and violated the principle that weapons should not be used against civil aircraft in flight. The resolution, sponsored by the United States, stopped short of condemning Cuban President Fidel Castro's government. Four people aboard the two Cessnas, operated by a Miami-based Cuban exile group, were killed when the Cuban air force fired on them.
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A year ago today, the long, rocky road of U.S.-Cuban relations seemed headed for resurfacing. Diplomats in Havana and Washington were quietly talking, academic exchanges between the two nations were commonplace, and even here in the exile community moderate voices were rising above the constant hard-line roar.
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A year ago today, the long, rocky road of U.S.-Cuban relations seemed headed for resurfacing. Diplomats in Havana and Washington were quietly talking, academic exchanges between the two nations were commonplace, and even here in the exile community moderate voices were rising above the constant hard-line roar.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council adopted a cautiously worded resolution stating that Cuba's downing of two unarmed U.S. civilian planes Feb. 24 was unlawful and violated the principle that weapons should not be used against civil aircraft in flight. The resolution, sponsored by the United States, stopped short of condemning Cuban President Fidel Castro's government. Four people aboard the two Cessnas, operated by a Miami-based Cuban exile group, were killed when the Cuban air force fired on them.
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