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United States Military Assaults Haiti

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NEWS
September 27, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His name is Virge. He is 24 and married and will be a father any day now. He loves football and he loves the Marines, and he has a wide smile and eyes as blue-green as the Caribbean. He is also the Marine who fired first--and gave the order for his men to fire too--on a group of Haitian police officers Saturday night in the only violent encounter involving U.S. troops since the military landed a week ago. The clash left 10 Haitian policemen dead. The actions of Lt.
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NEWS
September 27, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His name is Virge. He is 24 and married and will be a father any day now. He loves football and he loves the Marines, and he has a wide smile and eyes as blue-green as the Caribbean. He is also the Marine who fired first--and gave the order for his men to fire too--on a group of Haitian police officers Saturday night in the only violent encounter involving U.S. troops since the military landed a week ago. The clash left 10 Haitian policemen dead. The actions of Lt.
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NEWS
September 18, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On what could be the eve of a U.S.-led invasion of their tormented homeland, the parishioners of Notre Dame d'Haiti Roman Catholic Church will don their Sunday best today and pray for a quick end to any bloodshed. The cause may be a just one, they allow, but the fact remains that once again lives may be lost in the Caribbean. "As in all wars, some innocents will pay for it," said Jean Destine, a social worker who took his 11-year-old son to a peace vigil that broke up after sunrise Saturday.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ten Haitians were killed in a series of firefights late Saturday night in this northern port after a large group of supporters of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide tried to push their way into police headquarters, according to preliminary reports from Marines and civilian witnesses. The first gun battle occurred around 7 p.m.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. military could hardly ask for an easier target. If the United States intervenes in Haiti, as President Clinton has been threatening for several months, U.S. troops are unlikely to encounter any fierce opposition. In fact, there may be no opposition at all, military strategists say. Haiti has virtually no air force or navy, defense experts say, and the Haitian army--though 7,400 strong on paper--is poorly equipped and assigned to a variety of side jobs, such as firefighting.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has decided to seek a U.N. Security Council resolution authorizing an invasion of Haiti by a U.S.-led multinational force to topple the military regime, officials said Wednesday. At the same time, the Administration plans to back up the threat by lining up units for an invasion force of as many as 15,000 troops--most of them American, but as many as 3,000 from other countries. U.S.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights groups charged the Clinton Administration on Saturday with using abuses such as death-squad assassinations and gang rapes to justify invading Haiti at the same time it turns a blind eye to such atrocities elsewhere. "We're glad the Administration has finally come to see in all its true horror the extent of violations in Haiti," said James O'Dea, director of the Washington office of Amnesty International.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Passage of an amnesty for Haiti's military, a key part of the agreement for the resignation and removal of the Caribbean nation's military leaders, will be troubled at the very least, Haitian observers said Sunday night. Any expectation of quick action by the Haitian Parliament is likely to be frustrated, they said, by the complexities of Haitian politics both before and after the ouster of democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
Haiti's military regime still has time to avoid an invasion by relinquishing power on its own, Vice President Al Gore said Sunday. Invasion is "not inevitable if the illegal dictators in Haiti decide to comply with the world community's wishes and demands embodied in the United Nations resolution . . . and leave of their own accord," he said. Gore appeared to be softening a statement last week by Deputy Defense Secretary John M. Deutch that about 10,000 U.S.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dusk was gathering in Port-au-Prince as retired Gen. Colin L. Powell picked up the secure telephone line kept open for the U.S. negotiating team from the Haitian military headquarters to the White House. On the other end of the line, Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, Powell's successor as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, sounded an urgent warning in his Polish accent: Wrap this thing up and get out of there.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Passage of an amnesty for Haiti's military, a key part of the agreement for the resignation and removal of the Caribbean nation's military leaders, will be troubled at the very least, Haitian observers said Sunday night. Any expectation of quick action by the Haitian Parliament is likely to be frustrated, they said, by the complexities of Haitian politics both before and after the ouster of democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dusk was gathering in Port-au-Prince as retired Gen. Colin L. Powell picked up the secure telephone line kept open for the U.S. negotiating team from the Haitian military headquarters to the White House. On the other end of the line, Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, Powell's successor as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, sounded an urgent warning in his Polish accent: Wrap this thing up and get out of there.
NEWS
September 19, 1994
Significant dates in Haiti's recent history and current crisis: 1915--Haitian mob lynches unpopular president. U.S. Marines invade Haiti to restore order and enforce the country's financial obligations to American creditors. 1919--The Marines suppress a nationalist revolt. Thousands are killed, including its leader, Charlemagne Peralte, who becomes a national martyr. 1934--Marines pull out, leaving behind improved roads and a revamped military.
NEWS
September 19, 1994
Here is the text of President Clinton's announcement Sunday night about Haiti: My fellow Americans, I want to announce that the military leaders of Haiti have agreed to step down from power. The dictators have recognized that it is in their best interest and in the best interest of the Haitian people to relinquish power peacefully, rather than to face imminent action by the forces of the multinational coalition we are leading.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton faced two unpalatable alternatives in his showdown with Haiti's military rulers Sunday: launch an unpopular war that he wanted desperately to avoid, or accept a potentially messy compromise with men he has denounced as tyrants and thugs. As he has before in his career, Clinton chose compromise. His pragmatic choice spared 20,000 U.S. troops the risk of fighting their way into Haiti, and spared the President the burden of explaining a war that almost no one wanted.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Haitians in the Los Angeles area reacted with hope and suspicion Sunday night to the news that the military leadership in their homeland would be leaving soon, making way for the return of the nation's first democratically elected leader. "Is it a time for celebration? I don't think so," said Gilbert Perpignand, president of the Crenshaw-based Haitian Community Refuge Center.
NEWS
September 19, 1994
Significant dates in Haiti's recent history and current crisis: 1915--Haitian mob lynches unpopular president. U.S. Marines invade Haiti to restore order and enforce the country's financial obligations to American creditors. 1919--The Marines suppress a nationalist revolt. Thousands are killed, including its leader, Charlemagne Peralte, who becomes a national martyr. 1934--Marines pull out, leaving behind improved roads and a revamped military.
NEWS
September 19, 1994
Here is the text of President Clinton's announcement Sunday night about Haiti: My fellow Americans, I want to announce that the military leaders of Haiti have agreed to step down from power. The dictators have recognized that it is in their best interest and in the best interest of the Haitian people to relinquish power peacefully, rather than to face imminent action by the forces of the multinational coalition we are leading.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came cheers, then an uncertain silence. In anxious barracks and day rooms at the base for the military units that would have borne the brunt of an invasion of Haiti, officers and enlisted personnel watched President Clinton's speech Sunday night to learn what their future would be. When Clinton singled out Ft. Bragg and the 82nd Airborne Division for praise, the headquarters of the 327th Battalion of the 35th Signal Corps here erupted with cheers and youthful woofing.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Jimmy Carter was ushered into early retirement by the American voters because they saw him as ineffective at home and weak abroad, but he has shown again this weekend that he retains two surpassing virtues: a preternatural patience and an unshakable faith in his fellow man.
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