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United States Military Assaults Iraq

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NEWS
June 29, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Iraq has lodged a formal protest with the Security Council over the U.S. cruise missile attack on Baghdad, accusing the United States of "state terrorism and blackmail." "This was a deliberate terrorist act perpetrated by the government of the United States of America on grounds which were spurious and unjustified," said the letter, made public Monday, from Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohammed Said Sahaf to the Security Council.
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NEWS
April 14, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. and British planes attacked targets in southern Iraq in response to antiaircraft artillery fired on coalition planes, U.S. officials said. There were no casualties, the official Iraqi News Agency, or INA, reported. The airstrikes targeted an antiaircraft missile site in the hopes of reducing Iraq's ability to fire upon Western allies enforcing a "no-fly" zone set up to protect Shiite Muslims in the area, the U.S. Central Command said.
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NEWS
February 21, 1998 | From a Times staff writer
CBS jumped the gun Friday on a possible U.S. attack on Iraq: The network inadvertently transmitted a practice news report via satellite that could be picked up by television stations and viewers with special equipment. To try out new graphics for combat coverage in the event the U.S. goes forward with the threatened bombing of Iraq, CBS anchor Dan Rather was rehearsing with Pentagon correspondent David Martin over a closed line between CBS' New York headquarters and its Washington news bureau.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colin L. Powell leaves today for a whirlwind tour of the Middle East and Europe, but the tenor of his first overseas trip as secretary of State has been transformed as a result of the U.S.-British airstrike on Iraq last week. The secretary may well find that the honeymoon for the Bush administration on foreign policy is already over--at least when it comes to the Mideast, U.S. analysts and Mideast experts say.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before President Clinton ordered Sunday's retaliatory strike against Baghdad, American intelligence concluded that it was Iraqi President Saddam Hussein himself who had directed the attempted car bomb assassination of former President George Bush in April and not a lower level of the Iraqi government or a Mideast extremist faction, a senior U.S. official said Monday. But officials said that in weighing the American response, no serious consideration was given to trying to harm or kill Hussein.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | Reuters
Over half of Americans polled are in favor of assassinating Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, a survey by Gallup for USA Today and CNN reported Monday. It found that 53% of the 602 Americans interviewed by telephone favored killing Hussein; 37% were against it. The poll had a margin of error of five percentage points.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | ART PINE and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The confrontation between the United Nations and Iraq moved further toward a climax, possibly this weekend, as the Security Council on Friday awaited Baghdad's response to a proposed compromise over Iraq's refusal to let U.N. weapons inspectors enter its Agriculture Ministry building. After a day of more diplomatic churning by all sides, Iraq's U.N.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring an Islamic holy war on America and its allies, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein early today ordered his pilots and air defense forces on the ground to fire on allied aircraft that fly over Iraq in the future. He also vowed to give his people "a great victory" in what he called another phase in "the mother of all battles." Appearing in full military dress in an extraordinary, live, early morning appearance on state-run Iraqi Television just hours after the U.S.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After consultations with the French on Thursday, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan is to arrive here today to meet Iraqi leaders for what might be the last chance to negotiate Iraq out of the cross hairs of a U.S.-British strike force poised in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | PATRICK J. SLOYAN, NEWSDAY
Using plows mounted on tanks and combat earthmovers, the U.S. Army division that broke through Saddam Hussein's defensive front line buried thousands of Iraqi soldiers--some still alive and firing their weapons--in more than 70 miles of trenches, according to U.S. Army officials.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
The U.S.-British bombing of Iraqi air defense sites last week damaged less than half the radars targeted, and the overall result was at best a modest success, a senior defense official said Wednesday. The allies rate a B-minus or a C-plus as regards the bombing's accuracy, the official said. He discussed the Pentagon's preliminary damage assessment on condition of anonymity. On Tuesday, Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | From Reuters
Iraq has confirmed that it will attend U.N. talks this month on the decade-old Persian Gulf War sanctions, despite last week's airstrikes near Baghdad by the United States and Britain, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Tuesday. Annan, speaking to reporters, also said the United States assured him that the air attacks were "not an escalation, not a qualitative difference in their activities in Iraq."
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tony Blair strongly defended the latest U.S.-British bombing of Iraq against growing European criticism Tuesday, three days before his planned first meeting with President Bush. Blair denied that the policy to contain Iraqi President Saddam Hussein--along with military issues such as the proposed U.S. missile defense system--could drive a wedge between the United States and Europe and force Britain to take sides.
NEWS
February 17, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush, signaling that he intends to hold a tough line against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, ordered warplanes Friday to strike five air defense sites on the outskirts of Baghdad. Twenty-four U.S. and British planes hit command-and-control sites that Bush said posed a growing threat to U.S. fliers patrolling "no-fly" zones in the northern and southern sections of Iraq. "Saddam Hussein has got to understand . . .
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraq said that U.S. and British warplanes killed six of its citizens in airstrikes on southern Iraq and that its air defense units hit one of the aircraft. The U.S. military denied that any aircraft was hit, saying all planes returned safely after a raid conducted in response to Iraqi antiaircraft fire in the "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq. The U.S. Central Command headquarters in Tampa, Fla.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraqi gunners stepped up resistance to Western air patrols, firing surface-to-air missiles at warplanes monitoring a "no-fly" zone over northern Iraq, a U.S. Air Force officer said in Turkey, where the planes are based. It appeared to be the first use of such missiles since December, when Iraq started challenging U.S. and British planes patrolling the no-fly zones in the north and south.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. warships, acting two years to the day after the outbreak of the Persian Gulf War, unleashed a barrage of 40 Tomahawk cruise missiles at a nuclear fabricating plant on the outskirts of Baghdad on Sunday in a continuing effort to force Saddam Hussein to comply with U.N. resolutions.
NEWS
December 23, 1998 | Associated Press
The four-day attack on Iraq marked the first time that American female pilots dropped bombs in a combat situation. Navy Lt. Kendra Williams, 26, was the first of a group of female pilots to participate in the strikes. She flew her F/A-18 fighter-bomber as part of the attack force launched from the aircraft carrier Enterprise in the Persian Gulf. There are 16 female aviators on the aircraft carrier.
NEWS
July 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. warplanes bombed an Iraqi communications site in the northern "no-fly" zone after being fired on by Iraqi antiaircraft artillery, a U.S. military statement said. Air Force F-16s and F-15s dropped laser-guided bombs on an intelligence and operations center used by Iraqi forces to process radar information and target allied planes, the U.S. European Command said in a statement. The command is based in Stuttgart, Germany.
NEWS
July 8, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 78 days of airstrikes and 34,300 sorties, the United States and its allies appear to have curbed the flagrant aggression of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. But they have not managed to evict him from power. The situation bears an uncomfortable resemblance to their experience in Iraq. The U.S. and its allies were able in 1991 to reverse Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait.
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