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United States Military Assaults Serbia

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NEWS
April 21, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the United States has reached a "hinge point" in its Bosnia policy, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Tuesday that the Clinton Administration is actively considering a wide range of options to stop Serbian aggression, including some that were rejected earlier, such as allied bombing of artillery positions. "We now face a worsening environment in eastern Bosnia that has horrified the world," he told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | ART PINE and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States proposed to its European allies Tuesday that the West use stepped-up air strikes--rather than French or British ground troops--to protect the Bosnian "safe area" of Gorazde. The plan, hammered out during a 90-minute meeting between President Clinton and his top foreign-policy advisers, is designed to counter a French proposal to send 1,000 British and French combat troops to do the job.
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NEWS
May 1, 1993 | ART PINE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About 200 U.S. warplanes and the aircraft carriers Nimitz and Theodore Roosevelt awaited orders Friday as President Clinton prepared for a decision today on whether to launch allied air strikes against rebel Serbian forces in an effort to end the bloodshed in Bosnia. Although the Defense Department stopped short of actually placing U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The churches are well attended on a soft spring day, and so is the golf course. Cyclists race along country roads. Hamburgers sizzle. And two deadly-looking FA-18 fighters claw into the sky. It is a workaday Sunday in what may be the only American small town where tortured Bosnia-Herzegovina is a real place, a palpable threat, a source of grief. On Friday, a missile fired by Bosnian Serbs downed a U.S. F-16, the first plane from this base to be lost in the Balkan fighting.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | ART PINE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton won strong congressional backing Tuesday for a lifting of the arms embargo on Bosnian Muslims, but he received tough new warnings from key lawmakers and top military leaders against launching air strikes against Serbian positions in Bosnia.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they await word from Washington that could send them to war, can-do Yankee confidence and a television-reinforced sense of disconnection share the cockpit with young Americans patrolling the skies over tormented Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton nears a decision today on what measures to take to force the Serbs to halt their campaign of "ethnic cleansing" in Bosnia-Herzegovina, one major question looms: How will the Serbs react to what Washington and its allies decide? The issue is critical. Experts point out that the Serbs have come to view themselves as martyrs and are determined to face down enemies.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz declared Monday that the United Nations' diplomacy has failed in the former Yugoslav federation and called on the Clinton Administration to launch large-scale air strikes against Serbian military targets in both Bosnia and Serbia. "We should be ready to use air and naval power, and we should be ready to use it (against) gun emplacements, at supply lines, at military depots, at military training facilities," Shultz said in an interview.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If agony in high places is any measure, the war in Bosnia is already President Clinton's Vietnam. The President says that it is the issue he cannot stop worrying about at the end of the day; he takes the problem home at night and hashes it over with his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. The tragedy in the Balkans is "not only heartbreaking," he said this week, "it's infuriating." And Secretary of State Warren Christopher, a notably unemotional man, throws up his hands at the subject.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The churches are well attended on a soft spring day, and so is the golf course. Cyclists race along country roads. Hamburgers sizzle. And two deadly-looking FA-18 fighters claw into the sky. It is a workaday Sunday in what may be the only American small town where tortured Bosnia-Herzegovina is a real place, a palpable threat, a source of grief. On Friday, a missile fired by Bosnian Serbs downed a U.S. F-16, the first plane from this base to be lost in the Balkan fighting.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sending decidedly mixed signals, Bosnian Serbs aimed their weapons at NATO aircraft Friday and brought down an American jet fighter over northern Bosnia-Herzegovina, then later began releasing U.N. peacekeepers held hostage for the last week. The pilot of the American F-16, downed by a surface-to-air missile while on patrol, was missing but may have been taken prisoner by the Bosnian Serb army, officials of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization said.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | ART PINE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About 200 U.S. warplanes and the aircraft carriers Nimitz and Theodore Roosevelt awaited orders Friday as President Clinton prepared for a decision today on whether to launch allied air strikes against rebel Serbian forces in an effort to end the bloodshed in Bosnia. Although the Defense Department stopped short of actually placing U.S.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they await word from Washington that could send them to war, can-do Yankee confidence and a television-reinforced sense of disconnection share the cockpit with young Americans patrolling the skies over tormented Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton nears a decision today on what measures to take to force the Serbs to halt their campaign of "ethnic cleansing" in Bosnia-Herzegovina, one major question looms: How will the Serbs react to what Washington and its allies decide? The issue is critical. Experts point out that the Serbs have come to view themselves as martyrs and are determined to face down enemies.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If agony in high places is any measure, the war in Bosnia is already President Clinton's Vietnam. The President says that it is the issue he cannot stop worrying about at the end of the day; he takes the problem home at night and hashes it over with his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. The tragedy in the Balkans is "not only heartbreaking," he said this week, "it's infuriating." And Secretary of State Warren Christopher, a notably unemotional man, throws up his hands at the subject.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | ART PINE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton won strong congressional backing Tuesday for a lifting of the arms embargo on Bosnian Muslims, but he received tough new warnings from key lawmakers and top military leaders against launching air strikes against Serbian positions in Bosnia.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | ART PINE and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States proposed to its European allies Tuesday that the West use stepped-up air strikes--rather than French or British ground troops--to protect the Bosnian "safe area" of Gorazde. The plan, hammered out during a 90-minute meeting between President Clinton and his top foreign-policy advisers, is designed to counter a French proposal to send 1,000 British and French combat troops to do the job.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sending decidedly mixed signals, Bosnian Serbs aimed their weapons at NATO aircraft Friday and brought down an American jet fighter over northern Bosnia-Herzegovina, then later began releasing U.N. peacekeepers held hostage for the last week. The pilot of the American F-16, downed by a surface-to-air missile while on patrol, was missing but may have been taken prisoner by the Bosnian Serb army, officials of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization said.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz declared Monday that the United Nations' diplomacy has failed in the former Yugoslav federation and called on the Clinton Administration to launch large-scale air strikes against Serbian military targets in both Bosnia and Serbia. "We should be ready to use air and naval power, and we should be ready to use it (against) gun emplacements, at supply lines, at military depots, at military training facilities," Shultz said in an interview.
NEWS
April 21, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the United States has reached a "hinge point" in its Bosnia policy, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Tuesday that the Clinton Administration is actively considering a wide range of options to stop Serbian aggression, including some that were rejected earlier, such as allied bombing of artillery positions. "We now face a worsening environment in eastern Bosnia that has horrified the world," he told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
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