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United States Military Assaults Somalia

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NEWS
July 1, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Missiles fired from American helicopters Wednesday blew up another arms depot and staging compound serving Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid as U.N. forces intensified their efforts to disarm him after the shooting of eight more U.N. soldiers this week. The Pentagon said the attack, which began at 3 p.m., was designed to destroy the compound. It was identified as a staging area for the fatal attacks on two Pakistani soldiers and the wounding of six other U.N.
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NEWS
February 1, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Marines clashed with Somali civilians Monday in what some officials said could be a harbinger of the worst possible ending to the U.S. intervention in the East African country: the prospect of a series of last-minute attacks as American troops withdraw. The incident in Mogadishu, the Somali capital, came as U.S. forces began the final phase of their promised March 31 pullout.
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NEWS
February 1, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Marines clashed with Somali civilians Monday in what some officials said could be a harbinger of the worst possible ending to the U.S. intervention in the East African country: the prospect of a series of last-minute attacks as American troops withdraw. The incident in Mogadishu, the Somali capital, came as U.S. forces began the final phase of their promised March 31 pullout.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton ordered new U.S. troops and weapons to Somalia on Monday in the wake of a bloody military operation Sunday that left 12 Americans dead, 78 wounded and at least six held hostage. The casualty figures, more than double what officials had estimated only a day earlier--and the fact that some U.S. service personnel have been taken hostage--marked a major escalation in the military confrontation in Somalia and seriously threaten Clinton's policy there.
NEWS
July 14, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Johannesburg bureau chief Scott Kraft was recently on assignment in Mogadishu, Somalia
The United Nations' experiment in peace "enforcement" in Somalia has been badly shaken by the fruitless three-week hunt for warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid, the escalation of urban warfare and the deaths of 35 U.N. troops and four foreign journalists. With each passing day, the stature of the fugitive Aidid in the eyes of many Somalis is growing--and the U.N.'s reputation is falling. Somalis like a winner, and to many it seems that Aidid is winning.
NEWS
July 14, 1993 | Reuters
The Organization of African Unity called Tuesday for a review of U.N. combat operations in Somalia and said the world body should resume dialogue with people there. In a statement issued a day after U.S. helicopter gunships blasted the command center of warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid and four journalists were killed by Somali mobs, the OAU said it was "disturbed at the continued loss of life."
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. Cobra helicopter killed three gunmen with cannon fire after a U.N. base came under grenade attack, U.N. forces in Mogadishu said. At least eight rocket-propelled grenades were fired during the night at Hunter Base, a U.N. military compound. Pakistani sentries returned small-arms fire, joined by a Cobra that killed a lone gunman with a rocket launcher on a nearby building. Minutes later, the helicopter came under fire, and it destroyed an armored vehicle, killing the two occupants.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | From Reuters
Gunmen fired grenades at the office of the U.N. special envoy to Somalia on Monday and attacked U.N. officials reopening the first law court to operate in Mogadishu since the outbreak of civil war in 1991. The U.N. envoy, retired U.S. Adm. Jonathan Howe, escaped unhurt when three grenades were fired at his office in the heavily guarded U.N. compound, U.N. sources said.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive U.N. ground and air assault on a Somali warlord's neighborhood last week was originally planned as a three-day operation but was cut short after the first day, apparently because of top-level fears of a public relations backlash in the United States and Europe, a U.N. official revealed Sunday.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | KEITH B. RICHBURG, THE WASHINGTON POST
Last Monday's American helicopter assault on the command center of Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid was timed to strike a morning strategy meeting of his top militia commanders, U.N. officials said Thursday. The officials said that several of Aidid's high-level guerrilla commanders were killed in the attack, carried out under the aegis of the U.N. command in Mogadishu in what officials there said was an effort to halt attacks on U.N. peacekeepers and restore security in the Somali capital.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | From Reuters
Gunmen fired grenades at the office of the U.N. special envoy to Somalia on Monday and attacked U.N. officials reopening the first law court to operate in Mogadishu since the outbreak of civil war in 1991. The U.N. envoy, retired U.S. Adm. Jonathan Howe, escaped unhurt when three grenades were fired at his office in the heavily guarded U.N. compound, U.N. sources said.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. Cobra helicopter killed three gunmen with cannon fire after a U.N. base came under grenade attack, U.N. forces in Mogadishu said. At least eight rocket-propelled grenades were fired during the night at Hunter Base, a U.N. military compound. Pakistani sentries returned small-arms fire, joined by a Cobra that killed a lone gunman with a rocket launcher on a nearby building. Minutes later, the helicopter came under fire, and it destroyed an armored vehicle, killing the two occupants.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | KEITH B. RICHBURG, THE WASHINGTON POST
Last Monday's American helicopter assault on the command center of Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid was timed to strike a morning strategy meeting of his top militia commanders, U.N. officials said Thursday. The officials said that several of Aidid's high-level guerrilla commanders were killed in the attack, carried out under the aegis of the U.N. command in Mogadishu in what officials there said was an effort to halt attacks on U.N. peacekeepers and restore security in the Somali capital.
NEWS
July 14, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Johannesburg bureau chief Scott Kraft was recently on assignment in Mogadishu, Somalia
The United Nations' experiment in peace "enforcement" in Somalia has been badly shaken by the fruitless three-week hunt for warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid, the escalation of urban warfare and the deaths of 35 U.N. troops and four foreign journalists. With each passing day, the stature of the fugitive Aidid in the eyes of many Somalis is growing--and the U.N.'s reputation is falling. Somalis like a winner, and to many it seems that Aidid is winning.
NEWS
July 14, 1993 | Reuters
The Organization of African Unity called Tuesday for a review of U.N. combat operations in Somalia and said the world body should resume dialogue with people there. In a statement issued a day after U.S. helicopter gunships blasted the command center of warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid and four journalists were killed by Somali mobs, the OAU said it was "disturbed at the continued loss of life."
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. military forces firing from U.S. gunships blasted the command center of fugitive Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid in a Monday morning raid in Mogadishu, just a mile from the bustling city center where thousands of Somalis were going about their daily routines. A furious Somali mob armed with rocks, knives and guns turned on foreign journalists trying to assess the damage. Two journalists were killed in the melee, one was seriously wounded, and two others were missing and feared dead.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. military forces firing from U.S. gunships blasted the command center of fugitive Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid in a Monday morning raid in Mogadishu, just a mile from the bustling city center where thousands of Somalis were going about their daily routines. A furious Somali mob armed with rocks, knives and guns turned on foreign journalists trying to assess the damage. Two journalists were killed in the melee, one was seriously wounded, and two others were missing and feared dead.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton ordered new U.S. troops and weapons to Somalia on Monday in the wake of a bloody military operation Sunday that left 12 Americans dead, 78 wounded and at least six held hostage. The casualty figures, more than double what officials had estimated only a day earlier--and the fact that some U.S. service personnel have been taken hostage--marked a major escalation in the military confrontation in Somalia and seriously threaten Clinton's policy there.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Missiles fired from American helicopters Wednesday blew up another arms depot and staging compound serving Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid as U.N. forces intensified their efforts to disarm him after the shooting of eight more U.N. soldiers this week. The Pentagon said the attack, which began at 3 p.m., was designed to destroy the compound. It was identified as a staging area for the fatal attacks on two Pakistani soldiers and the wounding of six other U.N.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
American helicopter gunships opened fire on a Somali crowd Monday, killing at least two Somalis, after a sniper shot and killed a Pakistani soldier. It was the latest in a string of clashes between U.N. troops and Somalis since the United Nations attacked power bases of warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid earlier this month. The U.N. military spokesman, Maj. David Stockwell, said Pakistani troops had been searching for weapons in a building when they came under sniper fire.
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