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United States Military Bases California

NEWS
September 12, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Long Beach Naval Station is scheduled to close by the end of the decade because of Pentagon budget cuts, two popular military-run golf courses sought by local developers will remain open. Private developers say that the 280 acres of land that the Navy has used for its golf courses since 1966--an 18-hole "destroyer" course and a companion nine-hole "cruiser" course--would probably fetch millions on the market.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cost of cleaning up toxic pollution at 13 California military bases targeted for closure would top $3 billion, including at least $325 million for El Toro Marine Corps Air Station and Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, the state's environmental agency said Monday. James M.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is drafting an executive order to allow surplus military bases and other excess federal property to be used as shelters for homeless people, officials said Tuesday. Henry G. Cisneros, the new secretary of housing and urban development, said he is studying selected buildings on decommissioned bases near urban areas, including old barracks and officers' quarters, as part of the Administration's plan to convert defense facilities to civilian use.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Californians stand to lose hundreds of million of dollars in federal assistance for mass transit and for newly legalized immigrants and refugees under President Bush's $1.23-trillion budget released on Monday. Cutbacks in spending also threaten the closure of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and the Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo and promise further delays in modernizing the outmoded air traffic control center in Orange County.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | JANICE L. JONES / Los Angeles Times
1942 The U.S. Navy leases 1,600 acres of land from James Irvine as a base for dirigibles conducting wartime surveillance along the California coastline. Construction of barracks, mess halls, maintenance shops, a helium storage unit and two huge blimp hangars begins April 1. Five months later, the new field, known as the Santa Ana Naval Air Station--Lighter-Than-Air, opens with the two hangars still under construction. 1943 In October, crews complete the landmark hangars, costing $2.
NEWS
April 13, 1991
The Tustin base was among the 31 proposed on Friday for closure. Its military value is considered low due to encroachment by homes, offices and industrial facilities. Conversely, the prospect of developable land in the middle of built-up Orange County makes it attractive to sell the base. Profits would be cut by the need to clean up toxic sites on the base.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal commission created to review proposed military base closings Friday added another 36 installations, including the Long Beach Naval Shipyard, to the list of bases under consideration for phase-out or force reductions. The unexpected action by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission significantly expands the initial pool of 43 military facilities that the Pentagon has recommended closing.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Army engineers have constructed elaborate Iraqi-style fortifications here to train reserve troops in the techniques that might be needed if a Persian Gulf war should turn into a ground campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995
It is the Air Force's premier showcase for hotshot test pilots--a desert air base where members of the "Right Stuff" fraternity immortalized by writer Tom Wolfe push the envelope in America's fastest, most exotic aircraft--and try not to get killed in the process. Indeed, Edwards Air Force Base is named for a pilot, Glenn Edwards, who died there while testing a tail-less aircraft called the Flying Wing. Since the late 1940s, about 55 military and civilian test pilots have perished at the base.
NEWS
June 23, 1995 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 26 years working at McClellan Air Force Base, Ronald Wilkinson was simply not prepared for the bad news that a federal commission has recommended the base for closing. "I was flabbergasted," said the 46-year-old chief of fleet vehicle operations. "I figured we would get some realignment and some changes, but I didn't think they would close the base."
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