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United States Military Bases Europe

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NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Defense Department will end or reduce operations at 70 more overseas bases by the fall of 1995 as part of its plan to scale down the U.S. military presence worldwide, the Pentagon announced. All of the bases are in Europe, except for a small installation in Korea. The announcement marked the eighth round of reductions in Europe, and Pentagon spokesman Bob Hall said the plan is to reduce U.S. forces in Europe by nearly half.
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NEWS
July 1, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a single paragraph buried deep in the conclusions of this week's meeting of European leaders on the French Riviera, but it could hold the seeds for reviving the United States' most enduring overseas relationship.
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NEWS
August 11, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO foreign ministers Friday offered unanimous rhetorical support for U.S. action against Iraq but ruled out committing the alliance's combined military forces, even if American troops come under fire. Manfred Woerner, secretary general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, said NATO will respond militarily if Turkish territory is attacked but will not send allied forces to Saudi Arabia in the event that American, British or French troops engage in combat there. Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Defense Department will end or reduce operations at 70 more overseas bases by the fall of 1995 as part of its plan to scale down the U.S. military presence worldwide, the Pentagon announced. All of the bases are in Europe, except for a small installation in Korea. The announcement marked the eighth round of reductions in Europe, and Pentagon spokesman Bob Hall said the plan is to reduce U.S. forces in Europe by nearly half.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon announced plans Friday to close or cut back operations at 63 more installations abroad, most of them in Europe, as it continues to thin old allied defenses against a once-feared Soviet invasion. The step brings to 559 the number of military sites worldwide affected by the Pentagon's efforts to reduce its bases overseas. While the network of U.S.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prairie stretches across this isolated expanse of eastern Montana like a minimalist's canvas. Brown and more brown, a million-acre monotone broken only by the clumps of sagebrush, the thin, thirsty grasses--and the deep tracks of military tanks. Such jarring sights may soon become more familiar in some of the West's most untamed lands.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
European officials are concerned that a new ban on importing U.S. hormone-fed meat, which goes into effect today, will escalate into a full-blown trade war between the United States and the European Community. The dispute, if not resolved quickly, could lead to an exchange of even greater trade sanctions between the United States and Europe, diplomatic specialists say, but, more dangerously, could strike at the structure of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The commander of U.S. forces in Europe said Wednesday that he opposes President Bush's decision to reduce U.S. troop strength there to 225,000 on grounds that more soldiers are needed to carry out the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's established defense strategy. Army Gen. John R. Galvin told the Senate Armed Services Committee that he was consulted about the Bush troop proposal only "a few days" before the President announced it during last week's State of the Union address.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In devising a 1991 defense budget that responds to the remarkable upheaval under way in the Soviet Bloc, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and his senior advisers have coined a new watchword: reversibility. In planning massive cuts, Cheney is choosing measures that would allow a quick reversal of declining U.S. firepower if Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reform program suddenly collapses and the Soviet Union reverts to the politics of military power, defense officials say.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon announced plans Friday to close or cut back operations at 63 more installations abroad, most of them in Europe, as it continues to thin old allied defenses against a once-feared Soviet invasion. The step brings to 559 the number of military sites worldwide affected by the Pentagon's efforts to reduce its bases overseas. While the network of U.S.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Cold War dawned in 1949, Army Gen. John R. Galvin was starting his military career as a private in the Massachusetts National Guard, wielding pick and shovel to help fight a series of forest fires then raging throughout New England. Today, the Cold War is over, and Galvin, who has risen to command all U.S. troops in Europe, says he could be back in the firefighting business--figuratively, at least.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The abrupt departure of tens of thousands of U.S. soldiers to Saudi Arabia has left U.S. military communities in Europe in a state of intense isolation, eerily quiet and increasingly cut off from the outside world by the threat of terrorism.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon, responding to tighter budgets and improved relations with the Soviet Union, said Tuesday that it will close down or reduce operations at 150 military sites overseas, including the complete withdrawal of U.S. forces from two air bases in West Germany and one in Spain. With tens of thousands of U.S. military personnel and their dependents involved, Defense Department officials said the shutdowns and reductions will start later this year and will take two to three years to conclude.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO foreign ministers Friday offered unanimous rhetorical support for U.S. action against Iraq but ruled out committing the alliance's combined military forces, even if American troops come under fire. Manfred Woerner, secretary general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, said NATO will respond militarily if Turkish territory is attacked but will not send allied forces to Saudi Arabia in the event that American, British or French troops engage in combat there. Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The commander of U.S. forces in Europe said Wednesday that he opposes President Bush's decision to reduce U.S. troop strength there to 225,000 on grounds that more soldiers are needed to carry out the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's established defense strategy. Army Gen. John R. Galvin told the Senate Armed Services Committee that he was consulted about the Bush troop proposal only "a few days" before the President announced it during last week's State of the Union address.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Cold War dawned in 1949, Army Gen. John R. Galvin was starting his military career as a private in the Massachusetts National Guard, wielding pick and shovel to help fight a series of forest fires then raging throughout New England. Today, the Cold War is over, and Galvin, who has risen to command all U.S. troops in Europe, says he could be back in the firefighting business--figuratively, at least.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a single paragraph buried deep in the conclusions of this week's meeting of European leaders on the French Riviera, but it could hold the seeds for reviving the United States' most enduring overseas relationship.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In devising a 1991 defense budget that responds to the remarkable upheaval under way in the Soviet Bloc, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and his senior advisers have coined a new watchword: reversibility. In planning massive cuts, Cheney is choosing measures that would allow a quick reversal of declining U.S. firepower if Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reform program suddenly collapses and the Soviet Union reverts to the politics of military power, defense officials say.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prairie stretches across this isolated expanse of eastern Montana like a minimalist's canvas. Brown and more brown, a million-acre monotone broken only by the clumps of sagebrush, the thin, thirsty grasses--and the deep tracks of military tanks. Such jarring sights may soon become more familiar in some of the West's most untamed lands.
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